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Alisma plantago-aquatica
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
Order: Alismatales
Family: Alismataceae
Genus: Alisma
Species: A. plantago-aquatica
Binomial name
Alisma plantago-aquatica
L.

The Common Water-plantain (Alisma plantago-aquatica), also known as Mad-dog weed, is a perennial flowering plant native to most of the Northern Hemisphere, in Europe, northern Asia, and North America. It is found on mud or in fresh waters.

The word alisma is said to be a word of Celtic origin meaning "water", a reference to the habitat in which it grows. Early botanists named it after the Plantago because of the similarity of their leaves.

Contents

Description

AlismaPlantagoBlossom.jpg

It is a hairless plant that grows in shallow water, consists of a fibrous root, several basal long stemmed leaves 15-30 cm long, and a triangular stem up to 1 m tall.

It has branched inflorescence bearing numerous small flowers, 1cm across, with three round or slightly jagged, white or pale purple, petals. The flowers open in the afternoon. There are 3 blunt green sepals, and 6 stamens per flower. The carpels often exist as a flat single whorle. It flowers from June until August.

The word alisma is said to be a word of Celtic origin meaning "water", a reference to the habitat in which it grows. Early botanists named it after the Plantago because of the similarity of their leaves. [1]

Similar Species

Narrow leaved water plantain Alisma lanceolatum, differs only in that the leaf tips are acuminate and shape is narrow lanceolate.

Medicinal uses

The dried leaves of the water plantain can be used as both a diuretic and a diaphoretic. They have been used to help treat renal calculus, cystitis, dysentery and epilepsy.

The roots have formerly been used to cure hydrophobia, and have a reputation in America of curing rattlesnake bites.

See also

External links

References

  1. ^ Rose, Francis (2006). The Wild Flower Key. Frederick Warne & Co. pp. 483-484. ISBN 978-0723251750.  
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Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikispecies

Alisma plantago-aquatica

Taxonavigation

Classification System: APG II (down to family level)

Main Page
Cladus: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Cladus: Angiospermae
Cladus: Monocots
Ordo: Alismatales
Familia: Alismataceae
Genus: Alisma
Species: Alisma plantago-aquatica

Name

Alisma plantago-aquatica, L.

References

Vernacular names

Dansk: Vejbred-Skeblad
Deutsch: Gewöhnlicher Froschlöffel
Eesti: Harilik konnarohi
English: American waterplantain
Hrvatski: Žabočun
Nederlands: Grote waterweegbree
Polski: Żabieniec babka wodna
Suomi: Ratamosarpio
Svenska: Svalting

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