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Logo for the 2008 All-Star Futures Game

The All-Star Futures Game is an annual baseball exhibition game between a team of top minor league prospects from the United States and a team of prospects from other parts of the World. It is played during the week of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

Contents

Origins

The Futures Game was conceived by Jimmie Lee Solomon, an Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations for Major League Baseball, looking for an event to showcase the minor leagues and round out the All-Star week festivities. Early versions of the game created marginal interest in the baseball community, but the event has drawn more interest each successive year.

Format

Rosters for the Futures Game are selected by Baseball America magazine, in conjunction with MLB and the all 30 major league teams. Every organization is represented, with no more than two players from any organization, and 25 players per team, divided into U.S. and World teams based on place of birth. (Players born in Puerto Rico are part of the "World" team despite being U.S. citizens by birth, because that territory has its own national baseball federation and national team). Games last nine innings (seven innings prior to 2008), with two extra innings available to settle a tie after playing all regulation innings. Pitchers are limited to pitching only one inning.

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Changes in 2008

Two major changes took place in the 2008 game:

  • For the first time, the United States team was drawn from the pool of players selected by USA Baseball for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing.[1]
  • The game lasted nine innings in regulation, rather than seven.

History

Year Winner Score Ballpark MVP MVP Team
1999 World 7–0 Fenway Park Alfonso Soriano New York Yankees
2000 U.S. 3–2 Turner Field Sean Burroughs San Diego Padres
2001 U.S. 5–1 Safeco Field Toby Hall Tampa Bay Devil Rays
2002 World 5–1 Miller Park José Reyes New York Mets
2003 U.S. 3–2 U.S. Cellular Field Grady Sizemore Cleveland Indians
2004 U.S. 4–3 Minute Maid Park Aaron Hill Toronto Blue Jays
2005 World 4–0 Comerica Park Justin Huber Kansas City Royals
2006 U.S. 8–5 PNC Park Billy Butler Kansas City Royals
2007 World 7–2 AT&T Park Chin-Lung Hu Los Angeles Dodgers
2008 World 3–0 Yankee Stadium Che-Hsuan Lin Boston Red Sox
2009 World 7–5[2] Busch Stadium Rene Tosoni Minnesota Twins
2010 Angel Stadium of Anaheim
2011 Chase Field
All-time:
United States: 5 wins
World: 6 wins

All-Time roster (1999–2009)

Abbreviations:

 P: Pitcher
 C: Catcher
1B: First baseman
2B: Second baseman
3B: Third baseman
SS: Shortstop
 IF: Infielder
OF: Outfielder
Contents
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

B

C

D

E

  • Yunel Escobar, IF (World), 2006
  • Danny Espinosa, SS (U.S.), 2009
  • Brett Evert, P (U.S.), 2002
  • Clint Everts, P (U.S.), 2004

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

Y

Z

References

  1. ^ Jonathan Mayo (2008-06-19). "Futures managers have New York ties". MLB.com. http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20080619&content_id=2962561&vkey=allstar2008&fext=.jsp. Retrieved 2008-06-25.  
  2. ^ Game shortened to seven innings after a four-hour rain delay in the first inning.

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