Allan McNish: Wikis

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Allan McNish
Allan McNish 2006 EMS.jpg
Nationality United Kingdom Scotland British Scottish
Formula One World Championship career
Active years 2002
Teams Toyota
Races 17 (16 starts)
Championships 0
Wins 0
Podiums 0
Career points 0
Pole positions 0
Fastest laps 0
First race 2002 Australian Grand Prix
Last race 2002 Japanese Grand Prix
24 Hours of Le Mans career
Participating years 1997 - 2000, 2004 -
Teams Roock Racing, Porsche AG, Toyota Motorsports, Audi Sport Joest, Audi Sport UK, Champion Racing
Best finish 1st (1998, 2008)
Class wins 2 (1998, 2008)

Allan McNish (born 29 December 1969 in Dumfries, Scotland) is a racing driver. He is a two-time winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, most recently in 2008, and two-time American Le Mans Series champion.

Contents

Biography

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Early life

When at school Allan McNish played football. His football enthusiasm extended to watching where he was a fan by television of Nottingham Forest and on occasion when time allowed he would support his local club, Queen of the South playing at Palmerston Park. It wasn't until McNish began in karting that he found something at which he excelled.[1]

Career beginnings

Allan McNish began his career in karting like fellow Dumfries and Galloway driver David Coulthard. McNish credited the start given to both of them and Dario Franchitti as being largely down to David Leslie senior and junior.[2]

McNish and Coulthard both were recognised with a McLaren/Autosport BRDC Young Driver of the Year award having moved up to car racing. In 1988 he won the Formula Vauxhall Lotus championship and in 1989 finished runner up to David Brabham in a close fought British Formula Three Championship. During the late 1980s McNish shared a house with team mate Mika Häkkinen.[3]

Tipped as a future F1 driver, he tested with both McLaren and Benetton, whilst also competing in F3000, then the recognised second tier of European motorsport, in 1990-1992. Whilst racing his first season in F3000, McNish suffered a crash at a race in Donington Park where a bystander was fatally injured and left him unconscious for 3 days[4]. He went on to finish 4th overall in the championship that season. Concentrating on F1 opportunities meant he appeared in F3000 only once during 1994, at Pau.

When an F1 drive failed to materialise, he returned to F3000 in 1995 with Paul Stewart Racing (run by the son of Sir Jackie Stewart who went on to form Stewart Grand Prix). While he was arguably the fastest driver of the year, a series of mishaps saw him well beaten by Super Nova drivers Vincenzo Sospiri and Ricardo Rosset in the title race. McNish's career appeared to stall in early 1996 after a deal to race in Formula Nippon fell through and Mark Blundell was preferred for a drive with the PacWest CART team. He also tested for Benetton during the year.

Sports Cars

Having devoted his career to the pursuit of an F1 chance, it is ironic that McNish has become one of the world's most highly rated sportscar drivers. His sportscar career began in 1996 with Porsche, at a time when their 911 GT1 model revolutionized sportscar racing. With the factory team he took this car to victory in the 1998 24 Hours of Le Mans, partnered by Laurent Aïello and Stephane Ortelli. He subsequently appeared for Toyota and Audi in the race, and after losing a likely victory in the dying stages of the 2007 event, scored a second triumph in 2008 with Tom Kristensen and Rinaldo Capello driving an Audi R10.[5] He has also raced with great success for Audi in the American Le Mans Series, winning the title with Dindo Capello in 2006 and 2007, and taking three overall victories at the 12 Hours of Sebring (2004, 2006 and 2009).

Formula One

McNish's Toyota engine fails at the 2002 French Grand Prix.

McNish finally found an opening into Formula One in 2001, when the newly formed Toyota F1 team required a development driver. Given his link with Toyota through sportscars he was an obvious choice for this role, and impressed in testing to the extent that McNish was on the starting grid for the team's F1 race debut on 3 March 2002. Unfortunately, he did not score any points during the season's 17 races, and he and team-mate Mika Salo were replaced with a new line-up of Olivier Panis and Cristiano da Matta for 2003. Salo had scored points for the team on their debut in Melbourne and McNish had very nearly done the same with a superb drive in the Malaysian Grand Prix, only for a pit lane mistake by the team to cost him the result. Both drivers were told of their replacement before Da Matta was announced, and ITV's Martin Brundle commented that "replacing Salo and McNish with Panis and A.N. Other" was not, in his view, a step forward. As it was, the most notable moment of McNish's sole season in Formula One was his dramatic accident at the 130R corner while practising for the Japanese Grand Prix at Suzuka, in which he escaped serious injury. This led to the corner being reprofiled the following year.

After Formula One

McNish driving an Audi R10 TDI at the 2008 1000km of Silverstone

In 2003 he was a test driver for Renault F1, also doing a little TV work for ITV, but the next year he returned to his successful sports car racing career, winning the 12 Hours of Sebring, combining this in 2005 with a venture into the highly competitive DTM (German Touring Car Championship), where he competed against the likes of former F1 men Mika Häkkinen and Jean Alesi. He also won Sportscar Driver of the Year awards from the Autosport and Le Mans magazines and the (Jackie) Stewart Medal Award for services to Scottish Motor Sport. He was made the President of the Scottish Motor Racing Club at their annual Prize Giving and Dinner in 2007, succeeding Sir Jackie Stewart.

In 2006, he continued racing with the Audi factory team and was part of the driving line up which won the 12 Hours of Sebring in the new Audi R10 TDI diesel, setting pole position and breaking the lap record. In 2008, McNish won the 24 Hours of Le Mans for Audi alongside Tom Kristensen and Rinaldo Capello. It was his first win at la Sarthe since 1998.

Other formulae

As well as those above, McNish has also raced in the following racing series:

Personal life

He lives in Monaco with his wife Kelly. Prior to his marriage, McNish's stag party in Dumfries was attended by Dario Franchitti and Marino Franchitti that included taking in a Queen of the South football match.[1]

Racing record

Complete Formula One results

(key)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 WDC Points
2002 Panasonic Toyota Racing Toyota TF102 Toyota V10 AUS
Ret
MAL
7
BRA
Ret
SMR
Ret
ESP
8
AUT
9
MON
Ret
CAN
Ret
EUR
14
GBR
Ret
FRA
11
GER
Ret
HUN
14
BEL
9
ITA
Ret
USA
15
JPN
DNS
19th 0
2003 Mild Seven Renault F1 Team Renault R23 Renault V10 AUS
TD
MAL
TD
BRA
TD
SMR
TD
ESP
TD
AUT
TD
MON
TD
CAN
TD
EUR
TD
FRA
- -
Renault R23B GBR
TD
GER
TD
HUN
TD
ITA
TD
USA
TD
JPN
TD

Complete American Le Mans Series Results

Year Entrant Chassis Engine Tyres 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 WDC Points
2000 Audi Sport North America Audi R8
Audi R8R
Audi 3.6L Turbo V8 M SEB
ovr:2
cls:2
CHA
ovr:20
cls:8
SIL
ovr:3
cls:3
NUR
ovr:Ret
cls:Ret
SON
ovr:1
cls:1
MOS
ovr:1
cls:1
TEX
ovr:2
cls:2
ROS
ovr:1
cls:1
PET
ovr:1
cls:1
MON
ovr:1
cls:1
LSV
ovr:2
cls:2
ADE
ovr:1
cls:1
1st 270
2004 Audi Sport UK Team Veloqx Audi R8 Audi 3.6L Turbo V8 M SEB
ovr:1
cls:1
MID LIM SON POR MOS AME PET MON 7th 26
2005 ADT Champion Racing Audi R8 Audi 3.6L Turbo V8 M SEB
ovr:2
cls:2
ATL MID LIM SON POR AME MOS PET MON 10th 22
2006 Audi Sport North America Audi R10 TDI
Audi R8
Audi 5.5L Turbo V12 (Diesel)
Audi 3.6L Turbo V8
M SEB
ovr:1
cls:1
TEX
ovr:1
cls:1
MID
ovr:3
cls:1
LIM
ovr:1
cls:1
UTA
ovr:4
cls:3
POR
ovr:1
cls:1
AME
ovr:2
cls:2
MOS
ovr:1
cls:1
PET
ovr:1
cls:1
MON
ovr:1
cls:1
1st 204
2007 Audi Sport North America Audi R10 TDI Audi 5.5L Turbo V12 (Diesel) M SEB
ovr:4
cls:2
STP
ovr:1
cls:1
LNB
ovr:7
cls:1
TEX
ovr:3
cls:1
UTA
ovr:2
cls:1
LIM
ovr:5
cls:1
MID
ovr:5
cls:2
AME
ovr:2
cls:1
MOS
ovr:2
cls:1
DET
ovr:3
:cls:2
PET
ovr:1
cls:1
MON
ovr:1
cls:1
1st 246
2008 Audi Sport North America Audi R10 TDI Audi 5.5L Turbo V12 (Diesel) M SEB
ovr:3
cls:1
STP LNB UTA LIM MID AME MOS DET PET
ovr:1
cls:1
MON 8th 60
2009 Audi Sport Team Joest Audi R15 TDI Audi 5.5L Turbo V10 (Diesel) M SEB
ovr:1
cls:1
STP LNB UTA LIM MID AME MOS PET
ovr:3
cls:3
MON 10th 30

References

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Michele Alboreto
Stefan Johansson
Tom Kristensen
Winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans
1998 with:
Laurent Aïello
Stéphane Ortelli
Succeeded by
Pierluigi Martini
Yannick Dalmas
Joachim Winkelhock
Preceded by
Elliott Forbes-Robinson
American Le Mans Series champion
2000
Succeeded by
Emanuele Pirro
Preceded by
Frank Biela
Emanuele Pirro
American Le Mans Series champion
2006-2007
with Rinaldo Capello
Succeeded by
Lucas Luhr
Marco Werner
Preceded by
Frank Biela
Emanuele Pirro
Marco Werner
Winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans
2008 with:
Rinaldo Capello
Tom Kristensen
Succeeded by
David Brabham
Marc Gené
Alexander Wurz
Awards
Preceded by
Eddie Irvine
Autosport
British Club Driver of the Year

1988
Succeeded by
David Coulthard
Preceded by
JJ Lehto
Autosport
National Racing Driver of the Year

1989
Succeeded by
Robb Gravett
Preceded by
Lewis Hamilton
Autosport
British Competition Driver of the Year

2008
Succeeded by
Jenson Button
Preceded by
Lewis Hamilton
Segrave Trophy
2008
Succeeded by
Incumbent

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