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Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle

Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle
Born October 28, 1806
Paris
Died April 4, 1893
Geneva
Nationality France
Switzerland
Fields botany
Institutions University of Geneva
Influences A. P. de Candolle
Influenced Anne Casimir Pyrame de Candolle, Nikolai Vavilov
Notable awards Linnean Medal

Alphonse Louis Pierre Pyrame de Candolle (Paris October 28, 1806 – Geneva April 4, 1893), was a French-Swiss botanist, the son of the Swiss botanist A. P. de Candolle.

He first devoted himself to the study of law, but gradually drifted to botany and finally succeeded to his father's chair at the University of Geneva. He published a number of botanical works, including continuations of the Prodromus in collaboration with his son, Anne Casimir Pyrame de Candolle. Among his other contributions is the creation of the first Code of Botanical Nomenclature (adopted by the International Botanical Congress in 1867), being the prototype of the current ICBN. He was elected a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1859 and was awarded the Linnean Medal of the Linnean Society of London in 1889. He is also known for a study of the religious affiliations of foreign members of the French and British Academies of Science during the Scientific Revolution that demonstrated that in both academies Protestants are more heavily represented than Catholics by comparison with catchment populations. This observation continues to be used (for example in David Landes' 1999 _Wealth and Poverty of Nations, cf. revised paperback edition, 177) as a demonstration that Protestants were more inclined to be scientifically active during the Scientific Revolution than Roman Catholics. This botanist is denoted by the author abbreviation A.DC. when citing a botanical name.[1]

References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

  • Fancher, R E (October 1983). "Alphonse de Candolle, Francis Galton, and the early history of the nature-nurture controversy". Journal of the history of the behavioral sciences 19 (4): 341–52. PMID 11608560.  
  • de Morsier, G (. 1972). "[Unpublished correspondence between Alphonse de Candolle (1806-1893) and Francis Galton (1822-1911)]". Gesnerus 29 (3): 129–60. PMID 4570878.  
  1. ^ Brummitt, R. K.; C. E. Powell (1992). Authors of Plant Names. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 1-84246-085-4.  

Works

  • Candolle, Alphonse de. Lois de la nomenclature botanique adoptées par le Congrès international de botanique tenu à Paris en août 1867... Genève et Bale: H. Georg; Paris: J.-B. Baillière et fils, 1867. 64 p.

External links

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Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle
File:Alphonse de
Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle
Born October 28, 1806
Paris
Died April 4, 1893
Geneva
Nationality France
Switzerland
Fields botany
Institutions University of Geneva
Influences A. P. de Candolle
Influenced Anne Casimir Pyrame de Candolle, Nikolai Vavilov
Notable awards Linnean Medal
Alphonse Louis Pierre Pyrame de Candolle (Paris October 28, 1806 – Geneva April 4, 1893), was a French-Swiss botanist, the son of the Swiss botanist A. P. de Candolle.

He first devoted himself to the study of law, but gradually drifted to botany and finally succeeded to his father's chair at the University of Geneva. He published a number of botanical works, including continuations of the Prodromus in collaboration with his son, Anne Casimir Pyrame de Candolle. Among his other contributions is the creation of the first Code of Botanical Nomenclature (adopted by the International Botanical Congress in 1867), being the prototype of the current ICBN. He was elected a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1859 and was awarded the Linnean Medal of the Linnean Society of London in 1889. He is also known for a study of the religious affiliations of foreign members of the French and British Academies of Science during the Scientific Revolution that demonstrated that in both academies Protestants were more heavily represented than Catholics by comparison with catchment populations. This observation continues to be used (for example in David Landes' 1999 _Wealth and Poverty of Nations, cf. revised paperback edition, 177) as a demonstration that Protestants were more inclined to be scientifically active during the Scientific Revolution than Roman Catholics. This botanist is denoted by the author abbreviation A.DC. when citing a botanical name.[1]

References

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (Eleventh ed.). Cambridge University Press. 

  • Fancher, R E (October 1983). [Expression error: Unexpected < operator "Alphonse de Candolle, Francis Galton, and the early history of the nature-nurture controversy"]. Journal of the history of the behavioral sciences 19 (4): 341–52. PMID 11608560. 
  • de Morsier, G (. 1972). [Expression error: Unexpected < operator "[Unpublished correspondence between Alphonse de Candolle (1806-1893) and Francis Galton (1822-1911)]"]. Gesnerus 29 (3): 129–60. PMID 4570878. 
  1. ^ Brummitt, R. K.; C. E. Powell (1992). Authors of Plant Names. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 1-84246-085-4. 

Works

  • Candolle, Alphonse de. Lois de la nomenclature botanique adoptées par le Congrès international de botanique tenu à Paris en août 1867... Genève et Bale: H. Georg; Paris: J.-B. Baillière et fils, 1867. 64 p.

External links


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