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Alvan Tufts Fuller


In office
January 8, 1925 – January 3, 1929
Lieutenant Frank G. Allen
Preceded by Channing H. Cox
Succeeded by Frank G. Allen

In office
1921 – 1925
Governor Channing H. Cox
Preceded by Channing H. Cox
Succeeded by Frank G. Allen

Born February 27, 1878(1878-02-27)
Died April 30, 1958 (aged 80)
Political party Republican
Children Peter Fuller
Profession Motor Car Dealer

Alvan Tufts Fuller (February 27, 1878 – April 30, 1958) was a United States Representative from Massachusetts. He was born in Boston on February 27, 1878. He attended the public schools, and engaged in the bicycle business. Fuller was founder and owner of the Packard Motor Car Co. of Boston. He was elected a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, and was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1916.

Biography

He was elected as a Republican to the Sixty-fifth Congress, reelected to the Sixty-sixth Congress and served from March 4, 1917, to January 5, 1921. Fuller served as Lieutenant Governor 1921-1924, and was elected Governor in 1924. He was reelected to a second term.

Governor Fuller faced a significant budget deficit leading to initiatives to reduce and economize the operations of state government. The fear of the spread of communism or the "Red Scare" combined with labor issues continued to be in the forefront of the national consciousness, manifesting itself in the Sacco and Vanzetti Murder Trial. Governor Fuller appointed a three-member panel: Harvard President Abbott Lawrence Lowell, MIT President Dr. Samuel W. Stratton, and retired Probate Judge Robert Grant to investigate the case and see if the trials were fair.[1] Governor Fuller accepted the committee's assessment that no new trial was called for and refused to delay their executions or grant clemency.

After leaving office, he became chairman of the board of Cadillac-Oldsmobile Co., of Boston. He did not accept compensation for services while in public office. Fuller died in Boston on April 30, 1958.[2]

He was interred in East Cemetery in Rye Beach, New Hampshire.

References

  1. ^ New York Times: "Appoints Advisers for Sacco Inquiry," June 2, 1927, accessed January 6, 2010
  2. ^ "Died". Time magazine. 1958. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,863430,00.html. Retrieved 2009-02-20. "Alvan Tufts Fuller, 80, onetime (1925-29) Republican governor of Massachusetts, who backed up the state judiciary, decided not to delay the electrocution of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti beyond Aug. 23, 1927; in Boston. A wealthy auto dealer (Packard) and onetime (1917-21) U.S. Congressman, Fuller was beset by pressure from near and far to intervene in behalf of the condemned men. After he appointed a committee headed by Harvard President A. Lawrence Lowell, which reviewed all testimony and supported the jury's decision that Sacco and Vanzetti were guilty of murder, the New York Times editorialized that "the condemned have had every opportunity which the law affords." Nonetheless, agitators charged that Millionaire Fuller and Brahmin Lowell were predisposed against the immigrant, anarchist Italians. On completion of his second term, Fuller—who never cashed a paycheck as Congressman or governor—returned to his business, became noted in Boston as a patron of arts and music."  

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Channing H. Cox
Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
1921–1925
Succeeded by
Frank G. Allen
Preceded by
Channing H. Cox
Governor of Massachusetts
1925–1929
Succeeded by
Frank G. Allen
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