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The department of Amazonas has a millennial history. There is some evidence exhibited on rocky walls dated from the most remote times, including the rock paintings of Chiñuña-Yamón and Limones-Calpón in the province of Utcubamba. Some of these haughty pictorial samples were made by people that had a hunting economy. These people perhaps left their traces 6 or 7 thousand years ago. At the times in which the formation of Peruvian civilization was consolidated, there appeared a type of ceramics mainly identified in Bagua.

From Chachapoyas culture, there are many architectural remains, such as Cuélap, Congón (now called Vilaya), Olán, Purunllacta (now called Monte Peruvia), Pajatén, etc. All these structures appear to be related. Their age is not known, nor the order of their construction.

Characterization of the Chachapoyas culture

The architectural model of the Chachapoyas is defined by the circular tendency of their constructions and the masonry of regular stones. Their constructions are also characterized for being raised on platforms that were constructed in slopes. Their walls are, in certain cases, decorated with symbolic figures. Some monuments such as Cuélap and other numerous enclosures, like Olán are huge.

It might indicate that the Chachapoyas constructions date back to the IX or X century, and that their architectural tradition was still current until the arrival of the Spanish to their territory in the second third of the XVI century. The exceptions were those constructions that were erected by the Incas using their own style, such as the ruins of Cochabamba in the district of Leimebamba.

The presence of two funeral patterns is also typical of the Chachapoyas culture. One of them is represented by sarcophagi, placed vertically and located in caves that were excavated in the highest place of the precipices. The other funeral pattern was groups of mausolea; that is to say "mansions for deceased people". They were constructed like tiny houses and were located in caves worked in cliffs.

The Chachapoyas' ceramics did not reach the handmade level of the Mochica's or Nazca's. Their small pitchers are frequently decorated by cordoned motives. As for the textile art, cloths were generally colored in red. A monumental textile, proceeding from the precincts of Pajatén, showed that had been painted with figures of birds. The Chachapoyas also used to paint their walls, as a haughty present sample in San Antonio, province of Luya, reveals. These walls stages a ritual dance of couples that were held by the hands.

Chachapoyas' Origin

According to the analysis of the Chachapoyas' objects made by the Antisuyo expeditions of Amazon Archaeology Institute, the Chachapoyas do not exhibit Amazon cultural tradition. Their cultural goods have Andean roots. Although in certain cases they present a particular physiognomy, the investigations show that it is only a question of forms that suffered modifications due to geographical factors and a probable relative isolation.

The anthropomorphous sarcofagi seem to be imitations of funeral bundles provided with a wooden mask proper of the so-called Horizonte medio, when it reigned culturally on the coast and the highlands as what is known as Tiahuanaco-Huari or Wari culture. The "mausolea" are modified versions of the chullpa or pucullo, an architectural element of funeral character that is widely spread in Peru and also found in the cultural frame Tiahuanaco-Huari.

People who lived in the mountain range of the Andes occupied zones of the Amazonian Andes, so as to extend the habitable area. People were dedicated, for three thousand years, to intensive farming and with an increasing population, needed to find more land to farm.

This has been called the "serranización of the rainforest". On one hand, the scenery of the Amazonian Andes changed, after the clearing of the tropical forests, into a barren one that resembles the mountain range of the Andes; and, on the other hand, the Andean people carried their cultural Andean baggage to places that were originally filled with Amazon verdant grove. This phenomenon, which is still current, repeated itself in the southern Amazonian Andes in times of the Inca Empire, with the mountain projection to the zone of Vilcabamba that raised haughty Inca architecture exponents like Machu Picchu.

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The department of Amazonas has a millennial history. There is some evidence exhibited on rocky walls dated from the most remote times, including the rock paintings of Chiñuña-Yamón and Limones-Calpón in the province of Utcubamba. Some of these haughty pictorial samples were made by people that had a hunting economy. These people perhaps left their traces 6 or 7 thousand years ago. At the times in which the formation of Peruvian civilization was consolidated, there appeared a type of ceramics mainly identified in Bagua.

From Chachapoyas culture, there are many architectural remains, such as Cuélap, Congón (now called Vilaya), Olán, Purunllacta (now called Monte Peruvia), Pajatén, etc. All these structures appear to be related. Their age is not known, nor the order of their construction.

Characterization of the Chachapoyas culture

The architectural model of the Chachapoyas is defined by the circular tendency of their constructions and the masonry of regular stones. Their constructions are also characterized for being raised on platforms that were constructed in slopes. Their walls are, in certain cases, decorated with symbolic figures. Some monuments such as Cuélap and other numerous enclosures, like Olán are huge.

It might indicate that the Chachapoyas constructions date back to the 9th or 10th century, and that their architectural tradition was still current until the arrival of the Spanish to their territory in the second third of the 16th century. The exceptions were those constructions that were erected by the Incas using their own style, such as the ruins of Cochabamba in the district of Leimebamba.

The presence of two funeral patterns is also typical of the Chachapoyas culture. One of them is represented by sarcophagi, placed vertically and located in caves that were excavated in the highest place of the precipices. The other funeral pattern was groups of mausolea; that is to say "mansions for deceased people". They were constructed like tiny houses and were located in caves worked in cliffs.

The Chachapoyas' ceramics did not reach the handmade level of the Mochica's or Nazca's. Their small pitchers are frequently decorated by cordoned motives. As for the textile art, cloths were generally colored in red. A monumental textile, proceeding from the precincts of Pajatén, showed that had been painted with figures of birds. The Chachapoyas also used to paint their walls, as a haughty present sample in San Antonio, province of Luya, reveals. These walls stages a ritual dance of couples that were held by the hands.

Chachapoyas' Origin

According to the analysis of the Chachapoyas' objects made by the Antisuyo expeditions of Amazon Archaeology Institute, the Chachapoyas do not exhibit Amazon cultural tradition. Their cultural goods have Andean roots. Although in certain cases they present a particular physiognomy, the investigations show that it is only a question of forms that suffered modifications due to geographical factors and a probable relative isolation.

The anthropomorphous sarcofagi seem to be imitations of funeral bundles provided with a wooden mask proper of the so-called Horizonte medio, when it reigned culturally on the coast and the highlands as what is known as Tiahuanaco-Huari or Wari culture. The "mausolea" are modified versions of the chullpa or pucullo, an architectural element of funeral character that is widely spread in Peru and also found in the cultural frame Tiahuanaco-Huari.

People who lived in the mountain range of the Andes occupied zones of the Amazonian Andes, so as to extend the habitable area. People were dedicated, for three thousand years, to intensive farming and with an increasing population, needed to find more land to farm.

This has been called the "serranización of the rainforest". On one hand, the scenery of the Amazonian Andes changed, after the clearing of the tropical forests, into a barren one that resembles the mountain range of the Andes; and, on the other hand, the Andean people carried their cultural Andean baggage to places that were originally filled with Amazon verdant grove. This phenomenon, which is still current, repeated itself in the southern Amazonian Andes in times of the Inca Empire, with the mountain projection to the zone of Vilcabamba that raised haughty Inca architecture exponents like Machu Picchu.

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