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American Basketball Association
Sport Basketball
Founded 1967
No. of teams 11
Country(ies) United States
Ceased 1976
Last champion(s) New York Nets

The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a professional basketball league founded in 1967. The ABA ceased to exist with the ABA-NBA merger in 1976.

Contents

League history

The original ABA was founded in 1967, competing with the well-established National Basketball Association, until the ABA-NBA merger in 1976. According to The NBA Encyclopedia, its long-term goal was to force a merger with the more established league. ABA officials told potential owners that they could get an ABA team for half of what it cost to get an NBA expansion team at the time. When the merger occurred, ABA officials said, their investment would more than double.

Ultimately, four ABA teams were absorbed into the older league: the New York Nets, Denver Nuggets, Indiana Pacers and San Antonio Spurs. Two other clubs, the Kentucky Colonels and the Spirits of St. Louis were disbanded upon the merger. A third, the Virginia Squires, had folded less than a month earlier, missing out on the opportunities that a merger might have provided.

The ABA distinguished itself from its older counterpart with a more wide-open, flashy style of offensive play, as well as differences in rules (a 30-second shot clock – as opposed to the NBA's 24-second clock. The ABA did switch to the 24 second shot clock for the 1975-76 season – and use of a three-point field goal arc. Also, the ABA used a colorful red, white and blue ball, instead of the NBA's traditional orange ball. The ABA also had several "regional" franchises, such as the Virginia Squires and Carolina Cougars, that played "home" games in several cities.

The freewheeling style of the ABA eventually caught on with fans, but the lack of a national television contract and protracted financial losses would spell doom for the ABA as an independent circuit. In 1976, its last year of existence, the ABA pioneered the now-popular slam dunk contest at its all-star game in Denver.

One of the more significant long-term contributions of the ABA to professional basketball was to tap into markets in the southeast that had been collegiate basketball hotbeds (including North Carolina, Virginia and Kentucky). The NBA was focused on the urban areas of the Northeast, Midwest and West Coast. At the time, it showed no interest in placing a team south of Washington, D.C.

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Commissioners

NBA great George Mikan was the first commissioner of the ABA, where he introduced both the 3-point line and the league's trademark red, white and blue basketball.[1] Mikan resigned in 1969. Dave DeBusschere, one of the stars of the New York Knicks championship teams, moved from his job as Vice President and GM of the ABA's New York Nets in 1975 to become the last commissioner of the ABA and facilitate the ABA-NBA merger in 1976.[2]

List of ABA teams

'See also' List of American Basketball Association teams

List of ABA championships

Year Winner Finals Loser Games Playoffs MVP
1967–1968 Pittsburgh Pipers New Orleans Buccaneers 4–3 Connie Hawkins C, Pittsburgh
1968–1969 Oakland Oaks Indiana Pacers 4–1 Warren Jabali G, Oakland
1969–1970 Indiana Pacers Los Angeles Stars 4–2 Roger Brown F/G, Indiana
1970–1971 Utah Stars Kentucky Colonels 4–3 Zelmo Beaty C, Utah
1971–1972 Indiana Pacers New York Nets 4–2 Freddie Lewis G, Indiana
1972–1973 Indiana Pacers Kentucky Colonels 4–3 George McGinnis F/C, Indiana
1973–1974 New York Nets Utah Stars 4–1 Julius Erving F, New York
1974–1975 Kentucky Colonels Indiana Pacers 4–1 Artis Gilmore C, Kentucky
1975–1976 New York Nets Denver Nuggets 4–2 Julius Erving F, New York

Prominent players of the ABA

For more information, see ABA All-Time Team.[3]

Succession

In 1999, a new league calling itself the ABA 2000 was established. The new league uses a similar red, white and blue basketball as the old ABA, but unlike the original ABA, it does not feature players of the same caliber as the NBA, nor does it play games in major arenas nor on television as the original ABA did.

See also

References

External links


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