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Amityville II: The Possession
Directed by Damiano Damiani
Produced by Dino De Laurentiis
Stephen R. Greenwald
Ira N. Smith
Written by Hans Holzer
Tommy Lee Wallace
Dardano Sacchetti
Starring James Olson
Burt Young
Rutanya Alda
Jack Magner
Diane Franklin
Andrew Prine
Moses Gunn
Music by Lalo Schifrin
Cinematography Franco Di Giacomo
Editing by Sam O'Steen
Distributed by Orion Pictures
Embassy Home Entertainment
Release date(s) September 24, 1982 (1982-09-24)
Running time 100 minutes
Country United States
Mexico
Language English
Budget Unknown
Gross revenue $11,328,000 (USA)
Preceded by The Amityville Horror (1979 film)
Followed by Amityville 3-D

Amityville II: The Possession is a 1982 horror film directed by Damiano Damiani. The screenplay by Tommy Lee Wallace is based on the novel Murder in Amityville by the parapsychologist Hans Holzer. It is a prequel to The Amityville Horror, set at 112 Ocean Avenue and featuring the fictional Montelli family loosely based on the DeFeo family. The cast includes Academy Award nominee Burt Young who was finding fame in Rocky at the time; there are a few references to the Rocky films within Amityville II. This film includes one of Young's rare darker roles as he plays an abusive and violent father in contrast to his more easy-going roles. It is the second movie in the Amityville Horror saga.

Amityville II set the pattern for low-budget sequels with little reference to real life events in Amityville, and is the only other film in the series to feature music composed by Lalo Schifrin.[1]

Contents

Plot summary

The Montelli family move into what they think will be the house of their dreams, but there is an evil presence lurking within. Demons terrorize the family, causing them to fall apart. The mother tries to get the local priest, Father Adamsky, to bless the house but he is driven away by her abusive and sacrilegious husband before he can properly help. The oldest son, Sonny, falls victim to demonic possession. During his possession he gets his sister to play a game where he is a famous photographer and she is his model. She agrees and eventually ends up having sex with him. The evil spirits cause Sonny to tear the family apart and he is forced to murder his parents and siblings. Father Adamsky realizes Sonny is possessed and asks the church for permission to perform an exorcism but this is refused when they didn't believe him. He therefore takes it upon himself to free Sonny's soul, although freeing him, he ends up possessed by the demon instead.

Production

George Lutz wanted the sequel to the 1979 film to be based on the book The Amityville Horror Part II by John G. Jones, but the producer Dino De Laurentiis secured a deal with American International Pictures for a sequel based on Murder in Amityville by Hans Holzer. Lutz sued De Laurentiis and ultimately lost, but succeeded in having posters placed in theaters stating "This film has no affiliation with George and Kathy Lutz."[2]

Unlike the first "Amityville" film, Amityville II was filmed in a studio in Mexico. Filmakers filmed at the same house in Toms River New Jersey that the previous film used. The explosion scene at the end of the film was real during filming. A highly explosive chemical which produces flames that burn out instantly was used. During filming of the explosion scene at the end of the movie the effect reportably backfired and burned the side of the house.

Inconsistencies

While a prequel, Amityville II contradicts the opening of the 1979 film which shows the family massacre, and like the actual event they are all sleeping. The bodies are also removed from the house in the morning, but in the first film, it's in the middle of the night.

Some of the family drama in the film did happen to the Defeos, but are exaggerated. The story introduces speculative and controversial themes, including an incestuous relationship between Sonny Montelli and his teenaged sister, who are based loosely on Ronald DeFeo, Jr. and his sister, Dawn.

Though supposedly set one year before the first Amityville Horror film, Amityville II is full of elements that are clearly from the 1980s, such as a miniature "Walkman" radio/headphone set and the presence of 1982 cars, televisions, etc.

Reception

Amityville II: The Possession received mixed to negative reviews. Critics claimed this film went overboard with the effects and the storyline was not as interesting as expected to be.[3] Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times, who gave the first film a negative review, claimed the film "is actually slightly better than The Amityville Horror" and mentioned some good technical credits and performances.[4] Although actress Rutanya Alda was nominated as Worst Supporting Actress at the 1982 Golden Raspberry Awards, again.

Despite most negative reviews, this film was a commercial success, ranking #1 at the box office.[citation needed]

References

External links

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