The Full Wiki

More info on Ananias of Damascus

Ananias of Damascus: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ananias of Damascus
Born Damascus
Died Eleutheropolis
Feast January 25

Ananias was a disciple of Jesus, and is traditionally listed as one of the Seventy Disciples whose mission is recorded in Luke 10. He also was the man reported in the Bible to have been sent by God to heal Paul's blindness and introduce him to the Church.[1][2]

The tomb with relics of St. Ananias at Surb Zoravor Church of Yerevan in Armenia.

Acts 9:10-18 tells of this event:

'The Lord called to him in a vision, "Ananias!" He answered, "Here I am, Lord." The Lord said to him, "Get up and go to the street called Straight and ask at the house of Judas for a man from Tarsus named Saul. He is there praying, and (in a vision) he has seen a man named Ananias come in and lay (his) hands on him, that he may regain his sight." But Ananias replied, "Lord, I have heard from many sources about this man, what evil things he has done to your holy ones in Jerusalem. And here he has authority from the chief priests to imprison all who call upon your name." But the Lord said to him, "Go, for this man is a chosen instrument of mine to carry my name before Gentiles, kings, and Israelites, and I will show him what he will have to suffer for my name." So Ananias went and entered the house; laying his hands on him, he said, "Saul, my brother, the Lord has sent me, Jesus who appeared to you on the way by which you came, that you may regain your sight and be filled with the Holy Spirit." Immediately things like scales fell from his eyes and he regained his sight.'

According to tradition, Ananias evangelized in Damascus and eventually in Eleutheropolis as well, where he was martyred some time in the 1st Century. Hyam Maccoby suggested he was the father of Joshua ben Hananiah.

Notes

  1. ^ Metzger & Coogan (1993) Oxford Companion to the Bible, p26.
  2. ^ Catholic Online, Saints and Angels

References

  • Metzger, Bruce M. (ed); , Michael D. Coogan (ed) (1993). The Oxford Companion to the Bible. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-504645-5.  
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message