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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Anderson Hunt (born in Southwest Detroit, Michigan) is a retired American basketball player.

Contents

NCAA career

Hunt is best known as a member of the successful and equally controversial 1989-91 Runnin' Rebels from the University of Nevada-Las Vegas (UNLV) that made back-to-back Final Four appearances including a national championship in 1989-90 where he contributed 29 points in a 103-73 rout of the Blue Devils of Duke University and named Most Outstanding Player of the tournament by the Associated Press[1]. In May 1991, the Las Vegas Review Journal published photos of Hunt with teammates David Butler and Moses Scurry in a hot tub with known sports fixer Richard Perry, igniting a monumental firestorm between coach Jerry Tarkanian, UNLV president Robert Maxon, and the NCAA[2]. This battle would eventually lead to Tarkanian's resignation at the end of the 1991-92 season. Hunt left school as a junior after the 1991 season to enter the NBA Draft, much to the dismay of his coach, who had hoped to convert him to point guard and make him the centerpiece of the team in the 1991-92 season.

Professional career

Despite his solid college resume, Hunt was not selected in the 1991 NBA Draft. The La Crosse Catbirds selected him in the second round of that year's Continental Basketball Association draft with the 25th overall pick. In later years, Hunt ended up playing professionally in Turkey, Poland, and France.[3]

Legal troubles

In October 1993, Hunt was arrested for marijuana possession[4] in connection with a traffic stop and later pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges. In 2002 he again ran into legal trouble, facing charges of attempted embezzlement after he failed to return a rental car for an extended period of time.[5] He was ordered to pay $1,300 in restitution and placed on probation.

Currently

Now retired from basketball, he currently works as a cook at the Burger Palace, located inside the Imperial Palace hotel and casino.

References

Preceded by
Glen Rice
NCAA Basketball Tournament
Most Outstanding Player
(men's)

1990
Succeeded by
Christian Laettner
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