Andrews, Texas: Wikis

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Andrews, Texas
—  City  —
Water tower in Andrews, Texas
Location of Andrews, Texas
Coordinates: 32°19′17″N 102°33′6″W / 32.32139°N 102.55167°W / 32.32139; -102.55167Coordinates: 32°19′17″N 102°33′6″W / 32.32139°N 102.55167°W / 32.32139; -102.55167
Country United States
State Texas
County Andrews
Government
 - Mayor Robert Zap
Area
 - Total 4.8 sq mi (12.4 km2)
 - Land 4.8 sq mi (12.4 km2)
 - Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 3,176 ft (968 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 9,652
 Density 2,017.5/sq mi (779.0/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 79714
Area code(s) 432
FIPS code 48-03216[1]
GNIS feature ID 1329539[2]
Downtown Andrews
A rural scene on United States Highway 385 north of Andrews

Andrews is a city in and the county seat of Andrews County in the U.S. state of Texas within the West Texas region.[3] The population was 9,652 at the 2000 census. Along with Midland and Odessa, these cities form the Midland-Odessa Combined Statistical Area with a population of 241,316 in four counties. Andrews was the fastest growing micropolitan in 2008. [4]

Andrews was incorporated on February 2, 1937. Both the city and county were named for Richard Andrews, the first Texan soldier to die in the Texas Revolution.

United States Highway 385 (north-south) and Texas State Highway 115 (east-west) intersect through Andrews.

Contents

Geography

Andrews is located at 32°19′17″N 102°33′6″W / 32.32139°N 102.55167°W / 32.32139; -102.55167 (32.321401, -102.551733).[5]

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 9,652 people, 3,478 households, and 2,598 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,017.5 people per square mile (779.6/km²). There were 4,047 housing units at an average density of 845.9/sq mi (326.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 75.65% White, 2.04% African American, 0.90% Native American, 0.71% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 17.72% from other races, and 2.94% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 41.95% of the population.

There were 3,478 households out of which 40.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.3% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.3% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the city the population was spread out with 31.5% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 20.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,774, and the median income for a family was $36,172. Males had a median income of $31,527 versus $22,266 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,101. About 15.3% of families and 17.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.5% of those under age 18 and 12.8% of those age 65 or over.

Andrews is the only populated city in Andrews County.

Economic development

Andrews is a city built on oil and soil. After the first oil well was drilled (1929) by Deep Rock Oil Company on Missourian Charles E. Ogden's property Andrews County became one of the major oil producing counties in the State of Texas, having produced in excess of 1 billion barrels (160,000,000 m3) of oil. However, the cyclical nature of the oil business (as well as dimishing production on existing wells), has caused the community to look into new means of economic development, such as waste disposal, which in some areas has caused controversy.

Andrews and the surrounding area get very little natural rainfall as they sit on a very thick layer of nearly impenetrable clay soil. As a result, it was considered geologically suitable for disposal of low-level radioactive and mixed waste. Waste Control Specialists (WCS), a subsidiary of Valhi and headquartered in Dallas, Texas, maintains a 14,000 acre (57 km²) site in Andrews County on the border with New Mexico. The company is applying for the right to dispose of both low level radioactive and low level mixed waste; currently, it can only process and store these types of waste (though it can dispose of regular waste). WCS is currently receiving uranium byproduct from a decommissioned Department of Energy plant in Fernald, Ohio.

The city is set to be the location of the $400 million HT3R project.

In 1972, Andrews became the site of the first Kirby Corporation vacuum cleaner factory outside of the original location in Ohio. It is often referred to as "Kirby West" to signify the westward expansion of the country.

In effort to attract events to the community, the city funded and built ACE Arena (a multi-purpose arena) which opened in March 2007. In addition the city opened Andrews Business Park South to attract businesses.

Education

Students are served by the Andrews Independent School District.

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Junior College

The Andrews Business and Technology Center was completed in January 2006, in conjunction with Odessa College and the University of Texas of the Permian Basin. The school focuses on technology and is a hub for distance learning.

Andrews County Veterans Memorial

Andrews County Veterans Memorial

Post Office

Andrews Post Office, 100 NW Avenue H, Andrews, Texas 79714-9998

Notable residents

References

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/013426.html
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2005-05-03. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ http://maxlucado.com/press/

External links


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