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Diocese of Manchester
Province York
Bishop Bishop of Manchester
Cathedral Manchester Cathedral
Archdeaconries Bolton, Manchester, Rochdale and Salford 
Suffragan Bishop(s) Bolton, Middleton
Parishes 292
Churches 356
Website www.manchester.anglican.org

The Diocese of Manchester is a Church of England diocese in the Province of York, England. Based in the city of Manchester, the diocese covers much of the county of Greater Manchester and small areas of the counties of Lancashire and Cheshire.

Contents

History

The Diocese of Manchester was founded in 1847, having previously been part of the Diocese of Chester, and originally covered the historic hundreds of Salford, Blackburn, Leyland and Amounderness. However, with the foundation of the Diocese of Blackburn in 1926, which took the three northern hundreds, Manchester was left with just the hundred of Salford. The final boundary change to the diocese was by annexing Wythenshawe from the Diocese of Chester.[1]

At the same time the diocese was founded, the collegiate church in Manchester was elevated to cathedral status to become the Cathedral Church of St Mary, St Denys and St George where the bishop's throne (Cathedra) is located.[2]

Archdeaconries and deaneries

The diocese is divided into four archdeaconries, each divided into a number of deaneries.[3]

Archdeaconry of Manchester

Archdeaconry of Bolton

Archdeanonry of Rochdale

  • Deanery of Oldham East
  • Deanery of Oldham West

Archdeanonry of Salford

Bishop of Manchester

The Bishop of Manchester is the Ordinary of the diocese and is assisted by the suffragan bishops of Hulme, Middleton and Bolton.[1]

List of Bishops of Manchester [1]
  1. James Prince Lee (1848–1869)
  2. James Fraser (1870–1885)
  3. James Moorhouse (1886–1903)
  4. Edmund Knox (1903–1921)
  5. William Temple (1921–1929)
  6. Frederic Warman (1929–1947)
  1. William Greer (1947–1970)
  2. Patrick Rodger (1970–1978)
  3. Stanley Booth-Clibborn (1979–1993)
  4. Christopher Mayfield (1993–2002)
  5. Nigel McCulloch (2002–date)

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Manchester and its many bishops. BBC. Retrieved 17 February 2009.
  2. ^ Manchester Cathedral. Official website. Retrieved 17 February 2009.
  3. ^ "Churches". Diocese of Manchester. http://www.manchester.anglican.org/churches. Retrieved 2009-06-03. 

Further reading

  • Dobb, Arthur J. (1978) Like a Mighty Tortoise: the history of the Diocese of Manchester; illustrated by Arthur J. Dobb and Derek Simpson. [Manchester] : [The author] ; Littleborough : [Distributed by] Upjohn and Bottomley (Printers)
  • Dobb, Arthur J. et al. (comps.) (2007) The Mighty Tortoise Marches On; or the Seven Stages of Man...chester. (The present study... began by being asked to prepare a presentation on the diocese for the annual national conference of the Central Council for the Care of Churches to be held in Manchester in 2009", preface)

External links

Coordinates: 53°29′N 2°14′W / 53.48°N 2.24°W / 53.48; -2.24

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Diocese of Manchester
Province York
Bishop Nigel McCulloch, Bishop of Manchester
Cathedral Manchester Cathedral
Archdeaconries Bolton, Manchester, Rochdale, Salford 
Suffragans Chris Edmondson, Bishop of Bolton
Mark Davies, Bishop of Middleton
Parishes 292
Churches 356
Website www.manchester.anglican.org

The Diocese of Manchester is a Church of England diocese in the Province of York, England. Based in the city of Manchester, the diocese covers much of the county of Greater Manchester and small areas of the counties of Lancashire and Cheshire.

Contents

History

The Diocese of Manchester was founded in 1847, having previously been part of the Diocese of Chester, and originally covered the historic hundreds of Salford, Blackburn, Leyland and Amounderness. However, with the foundation of the Diocese of Blackburn in 1926, which took the three northern hundreds, Manchester was left with just the hundred of Salford. The final boundary change to the diocese was by annexing Wythenshawe from the Diocese of Chester.[1]

At the same time the diocese was founded, the collegiate church in Manchester was elevated to cathedral status to become the Cathedral Church of St Mary, St Denys and St George where the bishop's throne (Cathedra) is located.[2]

Archdeaconries and deaneries

The diocese is divided into four archdeaconries, each divided into a number of deaneries.[3]

Archdeaconry of Manchester

Archdeaconry of Bolton

Archdeanonry of Rochdale

  • Deanery of Oldham East
  • Deanery of Oldham West

Archdeanonry of Salford

Bishop of Manchester

The Bishop of Manchester is the Ordinary of the diocese and is assisted by the suffragan bishops of Hulme, Middleton and Bolton.[1]

List of Bishops of Manchester [1]

  1. James Prince Lee (1848–1869)
  2. James Fraser (1870–1885)
  3. James Moorhouse (1886–1903)
  4. Edmund Knox (1903–1921)
  5. William Temple (1921–1929)
  6. Frederic Warman (1929–1947)

  1. William Greer (1947–1970)
  2. Patrick Rodger (1970–1978)
  3. Stanley Booth-Clibborn (1979–1993)
  4. Christopher Mayfield (1993–2002)
  5. Nigel McCulloch (2002–date)

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Manchester and its many bishops. BBC. Retrieved 17 February 2009.
  2. ^ Manchester Cathedral. Official website. Retrieved 17 February 2009.
  3. ^ "Churches". Diocese of Manchester. http://www.manchester.anglican.org/churches. Retrieved 2009-06-03. 

Further reading

  • Dobb, Arthur J. (1978) Like a Mighty Tortoise: the history of the Diocese of Manchester; illustrated by Arthur J. Dobb and Derek Simpson. [Manchester] : [The author] ; Littleborough : [Distributed by] Upjohn and Bottomley (Printers)
  • Dobb, Arthur J. et al. (comps.) (2007) The Mighty Tortoise Marches On; or the Seven Stages of Man...chester. (The present study... began by being asked to prepare a presentation on the diocese for the annual national conference of the Central Council for the Care of Churches to be held in Manchester in 2009", preface)

External links

Coordinates: 53°29′N 2°14′W / 53.48°N 2.24°W / 53.48; -2.24


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