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The parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. Based on a Roman parade-helmet design (of a general class known as spangenhelm), it has decorations like those found in contemporary Swedish helmets found at Old Uppsala (Collection of the British Museum)
Anglo-Saxons is the term usually used to describe the invading Germanic tribes in the south and east of Great Britain from the early 5th century AD, and their creation of the English nation, to the Norman conquest of 1066.[1] The Benedictine monk, Bede, identified them as the descendants of three Germanic tribes:[2]
.
  • The Angles, who may have come from Angeln (in modern Germany), and Bede wrote that their whole nation came to Britain,[3] leaving their former land empty.^ One of these Germanic tribes was Angles, [http://www.anglik.net/englishlanguagehistory.htm Anglik English language resource] who may have come from Angeln, and Bede wrote that their whole nation came to Britain, www.ccel.org/ccel/bede/history.v.i.xiv.html leaving their former land empty.
    • English Language - Home - oo.vg 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC english-language.oo.vg [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For Bede, the Angles came from Angulus, modern Schleswig which still has a district called Angeln.
    • The 5th Century Anglo-Saxon Invasion of England 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.mnsu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ One of these Germanic tribes was the Angles , 20 who may have come from Angeln , and Bede wrote that their whole nation came to Britain, 21 leaving their former land empty.
    • English language @ Top40-Charts.info 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.top40-charts.info [Source type: Original source]

    .The name 'England' (Anglo-Saxon 'Engla land' or 'Ængla land' originates from this tribe.^ Anglo-Saxon England 1 (1972), 63-83.
    • Old English Mary of Egypt 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC lib.uky.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ The few matches for the haplotype below fall exclusively in Germany, suggesting an Anglo-Saxon origin.

    ^ Owen-Crocker's "Dress in Anglo-Saxon England" (Manchester University .
    • Anglo-Saxon-msg 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.florilegium.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    [4])
  • The Saxons, from Lower Saxony (in modern Germany; German: Niedersachsen)
  • The Jutes, from the Jutland peninsula (in modern Denmark)
.Their language (Old English) derives from "Ingvaeonic" West Germanic dialects and transformed into Middle English from the 11th century.^ Dialects English language -- United States -- Dialects .

^ The Germanic Family of Languages English is a member of the Germanic family of languages.
  • History of the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.englishclub.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It developed into Middle English by the 12th century.
  • Old English English dictionary and English Old English dictionary - FREELANG 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.freelang.net [Source type: General]

.Old English was divided into four main dialects: West Saxon, Mercian, Northumbrian and Kentish.^ The four principal dialect forms of Old English were: Northumbrian , Mercian , Kentish and West Saxon .
  • Old English language - Wikinfo 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC wikinfo.org [Source type: Original source]

^ English is a West Germanic language that developed from Old English , the language of the Anglo-Saxons .
  • yawiki.org entry for English language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxons: Old English continued .
  • The English Language from Beowulf to Joyce 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC homepage.newschool.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Place names seem to show that smaller numbers of some other Germanic tribes also came to Great Britain: Frisians at Fresham, Freston, and Friston; Flemings at Flempton and Flimby; Swabians at Swaffham; perhaps Franks at Frankton and Frankley.^ The tribes they drove to the fringes of Britain left them some Celtic place names.
  • The Five Minute Linguist 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.cofc.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Some of the Catholic names came from Germanic gods: .

^ There were also some other groups of Germans coming as Frisians.

Contents

Etymology

.The term "Anglo-Saxon" is from writings going back to the time of King Alfred the Great, who seems to have frequently used the title rex Anglorum Saxonum or rex Angul-Saxonum (king of the English Saxons).^ English are of Anglo-Saxon origin.
  • The evolution of English vocabulary - There Just Seems to Be No End to It | World-Leading Language Solutions by WhiteSmoke 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.whitesmoke.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The first kings of England were Anglo-Saxons.
  • Wikijunior:Kings and Queens of England/The Anglo-Saxons - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.wikibooks.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The most famous king of the West Saxons was Alfred the Great.
  • Origins of English Language 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.ingilish.com [Source type: Original source]

[5]
.The Old English terms ænglisc and Angelcynn ("Angle-kin", gens Anglorum) when they are first attested had already lost their original sense of referring to the Angles to the exclusion of the Saxons, and in their earliest recorded sense refers to the nation of Germanic peoples who settled England and southern Scotland in and after the 5th century.^ Old English) original, now lost.
  • Beowulf and the Creatures of Denmark 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC www.ldolphin.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This apparently refers to an old English (Welsh?
  • Ye Olde English Sayings 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.goodwords.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Background As its name suggests, the Old English Sheepdog originated in England.
  • Old English Sheepdog, Bobtail, Bob, OES 24 January 2010 1:12 UTC animal-world.com [Source type: General]

[6]
.The indigenous British people, who wrote in both Latin and Welsh, referred to these invaders as Saxones or Saeson - the latter is still used today in the Welsh word for 'English' people,[7] and in the Scottish word for 'English' people, saesonach.^ These are attached to foreign words, and are never used for words recognized as English.
  • English Language : INFLECTIONS OF NOUNS 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.lousywriter.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This apparently refers to an old English (Welsh?
  • Ye Olde English Sayings 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.goodwords.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Saxon word used to describe foreigners .
  • Anglo Saxons 400AD - 1066AD - VillageNet History 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.villagenet.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

.The term Angli Saxones seems to have first been used in continental writing nearly a century before Alfred's time by Paul the Deacon, historian of the Lombards, probably to distinguish the English Saxons from the continental Saxons.^ By 1800 "Anglo-Saxon" was the term used for the Old English language.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ (Before that, Old English had been written using the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc.

^ Nennius was probably writing in the ninth century.
  • The 5th Century Anglo-Saxon Invasion of England 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.mnsu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[citation needed]
There is a theory that the name of the Angles came from the Germanic and Indo-European root ang- = "narrow", i.e. "the people who live by the Narrow Water (i.e. the Schlei inlet)".[citation needed]

Anglo-Saxon history

The history of Anglo-Saxon England broadly covers early medieval England from the end of Roman rule and the establishment of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the 5th century until the Conquest by the Normans in 1066.

Origins (AD 400–600)

.Migration of Germanic peoples to Britain from what is now northern Germany and southern Scandinavia is attested from the 5th century (e.g.^ Migration of the Germanic speaking people .
  • Anglo-Saxon England 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.uta.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The history of our language, English can be traced back to the arrival of three powerful Germanic tribes to the collapsing Roman colony of Britannia during the mid 5th Century AD. Jutes, Angles and Saxons and crossed the North Sea from what is present-day Denmark and northern Germany.
  • EnglandAndEnglishHistory.com - A timeline of the history of the English language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.englandandenglishhistory.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the mid 500s, waves of Germanic people -- Jutes and Angles -- from what today is Denmark, and Saxons from northern Germany, invaded England again.
  • Europe in the Early Middle Ages 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.fsmitha.com [Source type: Original source]

Undley bracteate).[8] .Based on Bede's Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum, the intruding population is traditionally divided into Angles, Saxons, and Jutes, but their composition was likely less clear-cut and may also have included Frisians and Franks.^ May 735 ), Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum .
  • 4. Middle Ages 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.englishare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Bede’s account of the composition of Caedmon’s ‘Hymn’ from the Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum at Hereot.dk .

^ Bede stated that the invaders came from the continental Angles, Saxons and Jutes.
  • The 5th Century Anglo-Saxon Invasion of England 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.mnsu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The Parker Library holds the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle which contains text that may be the first recorded indications of the movement of these Germanic Tribes to Britain.^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that she was killed by the Mercians [534] .
  • ENGLAND, ANGLO-SAXON KINGS 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC fmg.ac [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The first kings of England were Anglo-Saxons.
  • Wikijunior:Kings and Queens of England/The Anglo-Saxons - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.wikibooks.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 686 and 687.
  • ENGLAND, ANGLO-SAXON KINGS 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC fmg.ac [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]


Heptarchy (600–800)

Main article: The Heptarchy
The main Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms circa A.D. 600
.Christianization of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms began in 597 and was at least nominally completed in 686. Throughout the 7th and 8th centuries, power fluctuated between the larger kingdoms.^ When Anglo-Saxons became Christian in 597 they learned Latin.
  • Origins of English Language 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.ingilish.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxon Christianity: 6th - 8th century AD .

^ Where the Anglo saxons christians?
  • WikiAnswers - What did the anglo-saxons speek 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC wiki.answers.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Bede records Aethelbert of Kent as being dominant at the close of the 6th century, but power seems to have shifted northwards to the kingdoms of Mercia and Northumbria.^ Saxon Kingdoms (6th century) .
  • Battle of Britain - Catholic Vanities Subjugate the Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.jesusneverexisted.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The kingdom of Mercia emerged as the dominant power in England.
  • Europe in the Early Middle Ages 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.fsmitha.com [Source type: Original source]

^ At the end of his reign he dominated not only southern England, but also Mercia, East-Anglia and Northumbria ( Keynes 1995 , 18-19).
  • The Heroic Age: Personal Equipment and Fighting Techniques Among the Anglo-Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.mun.ca [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Aethelbert and some of the later kings of the other kingdoms were recognised by their fellow kings as Bretwalda (ruler of Britain).^ From time to time throughout this period, one Anglo-Sexo-Jewish king, recognised as Johnny Rotten by other rulers, had effective control of all or most of the English; so it is impossible to identify the precise moment when the Kingdom of England was euthanized.
  • Anglo-Saxon England - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC uncyclopedia.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Though frequently fighting among themselves, the Anglo-Saxons accept in principle the idea that one of their kings is the overlord of all the English with the title bretwalda , meaning 'ruler of Britain'.

^ The symbolic coronation was an important step, and six other kings of Britain, including the kings of Scotland and of Strathclyde, came and gave their allegiance to Edgar shortly afterwards at Chester.
  • Wikijunior:Kings and Queens of England/The Anglo-Saxons - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.wikibooks.org [Source type: Original source]

.The so-called 'Mercian Supremacy' dominated the 8th century, though again it was not constant.^ A Mercian mixed dialect, however, was primarily used for the greatest poetry, such as the anonymous 8th-century epic poem Beowulf and the contemporary elegaic poems.
  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE, 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.history.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Mercian dialect was important during the 8th century, mainly thanks to king Alfred, who ordered the translation into OE of some texts.

^ During the 8th century several kings in Northumbria were murdered in their struggles for power, while Mercia dominated the kingdoms south of the Humber River.
  • Franks and Anglo-Saxons 613-899 by Sanderson Beck 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Franks and Anglo-Saxons 613-899 by Sanderson Beck 1 October 2009 3:53 UTC san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.Aethelbald and Offa, the two most powerful kings, achieved high status.^ The most famous works from this period include the poem Beowulf , which has achieved national epic status in Britain.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ Hilda was the great niece of Edwin, one of the most powerful kings of Northumbria.
  • Channel 4 – Time Team 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.channel4.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ King Charlemagne of the Franks begins to nurture Northumbrian friendship in order to circumscribe the power of King Offa of Mercia.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

.This period has been described as the Heptarchy, though this term has now fallen out of academic use.^ In the United States, the term British English is much more frequently used for this variety of English; however, Peter Trudgill in Language in the British Isles introduced the term English English (EngEng), and this term is now generally recognised in academic writing in competition with Anglo-English and English in England.
  • English language and culture 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.lonweb.org [Source type: General]

^ Check out some of the slang terms they use.
  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE, 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.history.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Such neologisms were not exclusively created from classical roots though, English roots were used for such terms as horsepower, airplane, and typewriter.
  • History of English Language, Sami Makki. Student Publications, Research, Projects, Investigation and Academic Work presented by Atlantic International University students, faculty and other contributors. Bachelor, master, doctoral degree programs by dista 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC aiu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.The word arose on the basis that the seven kingdoms of Northumbria, Mercia, Kent, East Anglia, Essex, Sussex and Wessex were the main polities of south Britain.^ East Anglia ruled directly from Mercia.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ Of these Kent, Essex, Sussex, Wessex, East Anglia, Northumbria (Deira and Bernicia) and Mercia assumed prominence.
  • An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.fathom.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Anglo-Saxons created separate kingdoms, each with its own monarchy: Kent, Sussex, Wessex, Essex, East Anglia, Mercia and Northumbria.
  • Dark Age Britain : British Pride 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.britishpride.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.More recent scholarship has shown that theories of the 'heptarchy' are not grounded in evidence, and it is far more likely that power fluctuated between many more 'kingdoms'. Other politically important 'kingdoms' across this period include: Hwicce, Magonsaete, Kingdom of Lindsey and Middle Anglia.^ Too many of them like beer and other alcohol.
  • Welcome to Adobe GoLive 4 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.papyrus.com.au [Source type: Original source]

^ The rest of Ælfred's reign, after the peace that formally divided England between Danes and West Saxons, was spent consolidating his power as much culturally as politically.
  • Old English 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.uta.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ A small, isolated country, England is nevertheless the origin of a legal and political system that many other countries, including the United States, have since imitated.

Viking Age (800-1066)

.In the 9th century, the Viking challenge grew to serious proportions.^ In the 7th and 8th centuries Northumbria enjoyed political and cultural ascendancy in England, but in the 9th century both Northumbria and Mercia were utterly devastated by the invasions of the Vikings.
  • Learn Old English, Old English Windows, Old English Office, Old English Software, Old English Dictionary, Old English Translation, Old English Keyboards, Old English Tutorials, Old English Phrase Books, Old English Spell Checking 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.worldlanguage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Scandinavian words in English primarily entered English when Norwegian kings ruled York, during the Viking invasions of the 9th century.
  • The Development of the Early English Language: The History of Old English and Its Change into Middle English 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC ukirishhistory.suite101.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Northumbrian and Mercia were the prominent dialects before Viking invasions destroyed those kingdoms in 9th century.
  • The Development of the Early English Language: The History of Old English and Its Change into Middle English 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC ukirishhistory.suite101.com [Source type: Original source]

.Alfred the Great's victory at Edington, Wiltshire, in 878 brought intermittent peace, but with their possession of Jorvik the Danes gained a solid foothold in England.^ The rest of Ælfred's reign, after the peace that formally divided England between Danes and West Saxons, was spent consolidating his power as much culturally as politically.
  • Old English 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.uta.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ After his victory Alfred allowed the Danes to keep their conquests in Mercia and East Anglia provided that Guthrum their King was converted to Christianity.
  • History of the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.byfaith.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

^ This line divided England between the Danes in the north and the English in the south, an arrangement which led to the peaceful co-habitation of the two groups for several generations.
  • English language@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.An important development in the 9th century was the rise of the Kingdom of Wessex; by the end of his reign Alfred was recognised as overlord by several southern kingdoms.^ Alfred reigns over peaceful and prosperous kingdom.
  • Words in English :: History 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.ruf.rice.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Modern Persian had developed by the 9th century.
  • Farsi, the most widely spoken Persian Language, a Farsi Dictionary, Farsi English Dictionary, The spoken language in Iran, History of Farsi Language, Learn Farsi, Farsi Translation 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.farsinet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In 9th and 10th centuries the most important kingdom was Wessex.

Æthelstan was the first king to achieve direct rule over what is considered "England".
.Near the end of the 10th century, there was renewed Scandinavian interest in England, with the conquests of Sweyn of Denmark and his son Canute.^ England unified: 10th century AD .

^ The Danelaw was reconquered by the English in the early 10th century, but the Danes renewed their raids and in 1016 Cnut, king of Denmark and Norway, became the ruler of England as well.

^ There was Anglo-Saxon art before the coming of Christianity, and although the Norman Conquest brought England rapidly into the mainstream of Romanesque art and architecture , Anglo-Saxon traditions were not completely submerged and influenced the art of the Normans into the 12th century.
  • Anglo-Saxon Art and Architecture - ninemsn Encarta 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC au.encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.By 1066 there were three lords with claims to the English throne, resulting in two invasions and the battles of Stamford Bridge and Hastings, the results of which established Anglo-Norman rule in England.^ Then came the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 .
  • yawiki.org entry for English language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1066 a battle ensued near Hastings.
  • History of the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.byfaith.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxon was spoken until the Norman Invasion in 1066.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A695478 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

Culture

Architecture

.Early Anglo-Saxon buildings in Britain were generally simple, constructed mainly using timber with thatch for roofing.^ Early Anglo-Saxon buildings in Britain were generally simple, constructed mainly using timber with thatch for roofing, as shown in the 1972 film Monty Python and the Quest for the Holy Grail .
  • Anglo-Saxon England - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC uncyclopedia.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Early Anglo-Saxon buildings in Britain were generally simple, constructed mainly using timber with thatch for roofing.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ When did the Anglo-Saxons invade Britain?

.Generally preferring not to settle in the old Roman cities, the Anglo-Saxons built small towns near their centres of agriculture.^ The Roman city of Canterbury was, by the sixth century, in ruins, with small Anglo-Saxon houses built in between.
  • Kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxons - Kent 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.historyfiles.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxons: Old English continued .
  • The English Language from Beowulf to Joyce 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC homepage.newschool.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Re-settlement in the Old Roman Town .
  • Schools & Beyond: Roman & Anglo-Saxon Canterbury Reconstructed 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.canterburytrust.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In each town, a main hall was in the centre.^ In each town, a main hall was in the centre, surrounded by the huts of the townspeople.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In each town, a main hall was in the centre, surrounded by the huts of the townspeople, a cesspit for doing one's business, a church for Christians, and a few guilds for one to join in order to level up one's skills.
  • Anglo-Saxon England - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC uncyclopedia.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.There are few remains of Anglo-Saxon architecture, with no secular work remaining above .^ Was there any resistance to the Anglo Saxon advance?
  • Anglo Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There are few remains of Anglo-Saxon architecture, with no secular work remaining above ground.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxon architecture .
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

.At least fifty churches are of Anglo-Saxon origin, with many more claimed to be, although in some cases the Anglo-Saxon part is small and much-altered.^ English are of Anglo-Saxon origin.
  • The evolution of English vocabulary - There Just Seems to Be No End to It | World-Leading Language Solutions by WhiteSmoke 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.whitesmoke.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Little survives of the original decoration of Anglo-Saxon churches.
  • Anglo-Saxon Art and Architecture - MSN Encarta 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC uk.encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxon Art and Architecture - ninemsn Encarta 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC au.encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ At least fifty churches are of Anglo-Saxon origin, with many more claiming to be, although in some cases the Anglo-Saxon part is small and much-altered.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.All surviving churches, except one timber church, are built of stone or brick and in some cases show evidence of re-used Roman work.^ All surviving churches, except one timber church, are built of stone or brick, and in some cases show evidence of re-used Roman work.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The majority of words that constitute Modern English do not come from Old English roots (only about one sixth of known Old English words have descendants surviving today), but almost all of the 100 most commonly used words in modern English do have Old English roots.
  • History of the English Language | Random History 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.randomhistory.com [Source type: Original source]

^ DICTIONARY OF OLD ENGLISH CORPUS A complete record of surviving Old English texts, except for some variant manuscripts of individual texts .
  • ENG 519 - Introduction to Old English 24 January 2010 1:12 UTC beowulf.engl.uky.edu [Source type: Academic]

.The architectural character of Anglo-Saxon ecclesiastical buildings ranges from Celtic influenced architecture in the early period; basilica influenced Romanesque architecture; to in the later Anglo-Saxon period, an architecture characterised by pilaster-strips, blank arcading, baluster shafts and triangular headed openings.^ The early period of Anglo-Saxon .
  • Linguistics 201: History of the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC pandora.cii.wwu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Introduction to the Anglo-Saxon period pp.
  • The Anglo 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC 4classnotes.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxon architecture Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon Attitudes .
  • Anglo-Saxon Art and Architecture - ninemsn Encarta 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC au.encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Art

.Anglo-Saxon art before roughly the time of Alfred (ruled 871–899) is mostly in varieties of the Hiberno-Saxon or Insular style, a fusion of Anglo-Saxon and Celtic techniques and motifs.^ Anglo-Saxon architecture Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon Attitudes .
  • Anglo-Saxon Art and Architecture - ninemsn Encarta 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC au.encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Anglo-Saxons were on the defensive during this time.
  • Middle Anglo-Saxons (DBA III/24ab) 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC fanaticus.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Danes in England and Alfred 871-899 .
  • Franks and Anglo-Saxons 613-899 by Sanderson Beck 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Franks and Anglo-Saxons 613-899 by Sanderson Beck 1 October 2009 3:53 UTC san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.The Sutton Hoo treasure is an exceptional survival of very early Anglo-Saxon metalwork and jewellery, from a royal grave of the early 7th century.^ The early period of Anglo-Saxon .
  • Linguistics 201: History of the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC pandora.cii.wwu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The wealth of such kings, by the 7th century, can be seen in the treasure found at Sutton Hoo.

^ Tags: Anglo-Saxon archaeology treasure .

.The period between Alfred and the Norman Conquest, with the revival of the English economy and culture after the end of the Viking raids, saw a distinct Anglo-Saxon style in art, though one in touch with trends on the Continent.^ Anglo-Saxon history and culture; .

^ English are of Anglo-Saxon origin.
  • The evolution of English vocabulary - There Just Seems to Be No End to It | World-Leading Language Solutions by WhiteSmoke 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.whitesmoke.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Though coins were minted, the Anglo-Saxon economy was not cash based.

Anglo-Saxon art is mainly known today through illuminated manuscripts, including the Benedictional of St. Æthelwold (British Library) and Leofric Missal (Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Bodl, 579), masterpieces of the late "Winchester style", which drew on Hiberno-Saxon art, Carolingian art and Byzantine art for style and iconography, and combined both northern ornamental traditions with Mediterranean figural traditions. .The Harley Psalter was a copy of the Carolingian Utrecht Psalter — which was a particular influence in creating an Anglo-Saxon style of very lively pen drawings.^ What country did the anglo saxons live in?
  • WikiAnswers - What did the anglo-saxons speek 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC wiki.answers.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It was rare to find an Anglo-Saxon author who focused on the positives of a European-style social market economy.

^ Fisk is especially unhappy about the toppling of the Taliban and Saddam Hussein not because he had any particular love for them but because their demise came as a result of Anglo-Saxon action.
  • Loading... 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.aawsat.com [Source type: Original source]

.Manuscripts were far from the only Anglo-Saxon art form, but they have survived in much greater numbers than other types of object.^ They believe only in Anglo-Saxons.

^ Known now as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle , it survives in seven manuscripts.

^ Anglo-Saxon architecture Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon Attitudes .
  • Anglo-Saxon Art and Architecture - ninemsn Encarta 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC au.encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Contemporaries in Europe regarded Anglo-Saxon goldsmithing and embroidery (Opus Anglicanum) as especially fine.^ Fisk is especially unhappy about the toppling of the Taliban and Saddam Hussein not because he had any particular love for them but because their demise came as a result of Anglo-Saxon action.
  • Loading... 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.aawsat.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Anglo-Saxon Lyre is a five to seven (mostly six) string instrument used throughout northern Europe during the early middle ages.

^ With regard to the runic script it should be noted that it co-existed with the Latin alphabet in England for many centuries after the Anglo-Saxons adopted the Christian religion.

.Perhaps the best known piece of Anglo-Saxon art is the Bayeux Tapestry which was commissioned by a Norman patron from English artists working in the traditional Anglo-Saxon style.^ English are of Anglo-Saxon origin.
  • The evolution of English vocabulary - There Just Seems to Be No End to It | World-Leading Language Solutions by WhiteSmoke 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.whitesmoke.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxons: Old English continued .
  • The English Language from Beowulf to Joyce 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC homepage.newschool.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxon architecture Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon Attitudes .
  • Anglo-Saxon Art and Architecture - ninemsn Encarta 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC au.encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The most common example of Anglo-Saxon art is coins, with thousands of examples extant.^ Anglo-Saxon architecture Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon art Anglo-Saxon Attitudes .
  • Anglo-Saxon Art and Architecture - ninemsn Encarta 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC au.encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This is an example of a typical Anglo-Saxon farmstead.
  • Age of the Anglo-Saxons - Undoomed Warrior 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC undoomed.wetpaint.com [Source type: General]

^ Anglo-Saxon coins, ed.
  • Anglo-Saxon Bibliography 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.ravensgard.org [Source type: Academic]

.Anglo-Saxon artists also worked in fresco, ivory, stone carving, metalwork (see Fuller brooch for example) and enamel, but few of these pieces have survived.^ Anglo-Saxon artists also worked in fresco , ivory , stone carving, metalwork (see Fuller brooch for example) and enamel , but few of these pieces have survived.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ It is safe to assume that Anglo-Saxon artists also made woodcarvings, but none of these has survived.
  • Anglo-Saxon Art and Architecture - MSN Encarta 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC uk.encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxon Art and Architecture - ninemsn Encarta 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC au.encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Anglo-Saxon finds in church work .
  • Anglo-Saxon Archaeology Blog: January 2008 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC www.archaeology.eu.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Language

Old English, sometimes called Anglo-Saxon, was the language spoken under Alfred the Great and continued to be the common language of England (non-Danelaw) until after the Norman Conquest of 1066 when, under the influence of the Anglo-Norman language spoken by the Norman ruling class, it changed into Middle English roughly between 1150–1500.
.Old English is far closer to early Germanic than Middle English.^ Old and Middle English literature .
  • SULAIR: Medieval Studies: Old English 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www-sul.stanford.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Old English is far closer to early Germanic than Middle English.
  • Andy Rooney on the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC setiathome.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ II 0 5' EARLY MIDDLE ENGLISH. 1200 .

.It is less Latinised and retains many morphological features (nominal and verbal inflection) that were lost during the 12th to 14th centuries.^ It is less Latinized and retains many morphological features (nominal and verbal inflection) that were lost during the 12th to 14th centuries.
  • Andy Rooney on the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC setiathome.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxon is far closer to early Germanic than Middle English, i.e., it is less latinized, and retains many morphological features (nominal and verbal inflection) that were lost during the 12th to 14th centuries.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ During the 12th century, while this change was going on, we see a great confusion of grammatical forms, the full inflections of Old English standing side by side in the same sentence with the levelled ones of Middle English.

.The languages today which are closest to Old English are the Frisian languages, which are spoken by a few hundred thousand people in the northern part of Germany and the Netherlands.^ And I like the Old English language above all!
  • Old English? - UsingEnglish.com ESL Forum 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.usingenglish.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Old English language - Wikinfo .
  • Old English language - Wikinfo 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC wikinfo.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Today English is the worlds language.
  • History of the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.byfaith.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

.Before literacy in the vernacular Old English or Latin became widespread, the Runic alphabet, called the futhorc (also known as futhark) was used for inscriptions.^ Latin and Old English sources.
  • ORB: The Anglo-Saxons 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.the-orb.net [Source type: Original source]

^ English is written using the Latin alphabet.

^ English uses the Latin alphabet in its writing system.
  • Learn English - All About the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.innovativelanguage.com [Source type: Original source]

.When literacy became more prevalent, a form of Latin script was used with a few letters derived from the futhork: 'Eth,' 'Wynn,' and 'Thorn.'^ When literacy became more prevelant a form of Latin script was used with a few letters derived from the futhork; 'eth', 'wynn', and 'thorn'.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ When literacy became more prevalent a form of Latin script was used with a few letters derived from the futhork; 'eth', 'wynn', and 'thorn'.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ "The letter yogh, for example, was adopted from Irish; the letter eth was an alteration of Latin "d", and the runic letters thorn and wynn are borrowings from futhorc.
  • Anglo Saxon / Old English / Alphabet / Script / Manuscripts / Texts / Grammar / History 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.ahrtp.com [Source type: Original source]

The letters regularly used in printed and edited texts of Old English are the following:
  • a æ b c d ð e f g h i l m n o p r s t þ u w x y
with only rare occurrences of j, k, q, v, and z.

Law

.Very few law codes exist from the Anglo-Saxon period to provide an insight into legal culture beyond the influence of Roman law and how this legal culture developed over the course of time.^ An analysis of the influences of Anglo-Saxon culture on Shakespeare's play "Macbeth".
  • Term papers on ANGLO SAXON VALUES CULTURE, ANGLO SAXON VALUES CULTURE research papers and essays on ANGLO SAXON VALUES CULTURE - AcaDemon - 20090830 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC www.academon.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Numerous law codes exist from the Anglo-Saxon period, giving us an insight into legal culture beyond the influence of Roman law .
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Main article: Anglo-Saxon laws Numerous law codes exist from the Anglo-Saxon period, giving us an insight into legal culture beyond the influence of Roman law .
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The Saxons chopped off hands and noses for punishment (if the offender stole something or committed another crime). .If someone killed a Saxon, he had to pay money called wergild, the amount varying according to the social rank of the victim.^ It was the amount of money owed to the victim's family if he was killed.
  • All About Romance Novels - Scottish Monarchs of the Middle Ages 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.likesbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ According to tradition, Harold was killed by an arrow in the eye, but the victim depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry is anonymous.
  • Wikijunior:Kings and Queens of England/More Anglo-Saxons - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.wikibooks.org [Source type: Original source]

^ They also drew on one key bit of historical knowledge that wergild, or blood money, levied against someone who killed either a Celt or an Anglo-Saxon.
  • Exploring England's Anglo-Saxon Heritage : NPR 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.npr.org [Source type: General]

First page of the epic Beowulf

Literature

.Old English literary works include genres such as epic poetry, hagiography, sermons, Bible translations, legal works, chronicles, riddles, and others.^ As such, it is not typical of Old English prose.
  • Oldenglish.eu 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.oldenglish.eu [Source type: Original source]
  • The History of The English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.zeitlerweb.com [Source type: Original source]

^ See also: Old English poetry .
  • Old English language - Wikinfo 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC wikinfo.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Old English texts and texts in translation; .

.In all there are about 400 surviving manuscripts from the period, a significant corpus of both popular interest and specialist research.^ In all there are about 400 surviving manuscripts from the period, a significant corpus of both popular interest and specialist research.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ In all there are about 400 surviving manuscript s from the period, a significant corpus of both popular interest and specialist research.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I think what is most interesting about DNA studies is the fact,that each individual has a unique genetic code that occurs only once.We are all originals,never to be seen again.

.The most famous works from this period include the poem Beowulf, which has achieved national epic status in Britain.^ The most famous works from this period include the poem Beowulf , which has achieved national epic status in Britain.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ Perhaps the most famous is called Beowulf.
  • Where Did the English Language Come From? 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.voanews.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Where Did the English Language Come From? 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.voanews.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A Mercian mixed dialect, however, was primarily used for the greatest poetry, such as the anonymous 8th-century epic poem Beowulf and the contemporary elegaic poems.
  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE, 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.history.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a collection of important early English history.^ Anglo-Saxon history and culture; .

^ Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 686 and 687.
  • ENGLAND, ANGLO-SAXON KINGS 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC fmg.ac [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The early period of Anglo-Saxon .
  • Linguistics 201: History of the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC pandora.cii.wwu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Cædmon's Hymn from the 7th century is the earliest attested literary text in English.^ The poem Hymn from the 7th century is the oldest surviving written text in English.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ Cædmon's Hymn from the 7th century is the oldest surviving written text in English.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Courses taught : History of modern English literature - History of postmodern modern English literature - Translations - Literary analyses - Text interpretation - ESP - Communication techniques - Essays - Grammar exercises.
  • Department of English Language and Literature 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.lett.ubbcluj.ro [Source type: Academic]

Religion

.The indigenous pre-Christian belief system of the Anglo-Saxons was a form of Germanic paganism and therefore closely related to the Old Norse religion, as well as other Germanic pre-Christian cultures.^ Anglo-Saxon history and culture; .

^ Old Norse also derived from Proto-Germanic.
  • Anglo Saxon / Old English / Alphabet / Script / Manuscripts / Texts / Grammar / History 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.ahrtp.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Therefore, this period is also called the period of the Germanic Invasion or the period of the Anglo Saxons.
  • Dewi Widyastuti, S.Pd., M.Hum. 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.english.usd.ac.id [Source type: Original source]

.Christianity gradually replaced the indigenous religion of the English around the 7th and 8th centuries.^ Christianity (both Celtic and Roman ) replaced the indigenous religion of the Saxons in England around the 8th and 9th centuries AD. The Synod of Whitby settled the choice for Roman Christianity.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The oldest part of the cemetary is believed to date from around AD 1000, making it one of the oldest known Christian cemetaries in Gotland, and was in use for approximately a century.
  • The Heroic Age:Archaeology Digest 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.mun.ca [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In the Old English poetic tradition, the Christian religion itself took on a heroic cast and transformed the heroic ethos in turn.
  • Christian Heroism and the West Saxon Achievement: The Old English Poetic Evidence 24 January 2010 1:12 UTC www.sfsu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Celtic Christianity was introduced into Northumbria and Mercia by monks from Ireland, but the Synod of Whitby settled the choice for Roman Christianity.^ Christianity was also introduced by the Romans.
  • Dewi Widyastuti, S.Pd., M.Hum. 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.english.usd.ac.id [Source type: Original source]

^ Christianity (both Celtic and Roman forms) replaced the old gods in England around the 8th and 9th centuries AD. The Synod of Whitby settled the choice for the Roman form.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ Christianity (both Celtic and Roman ) replaced the indigenous religion of the Saxons in England around the 8th and 9th centuries AD. The Synod of Whitby settled the choice for Roman Christianity.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.As the new clerics became the chroniclers, the old religion was partially lost before it was recorded, and today historians' knowledge of it is largely based on surviving customs and lore, texts, etymological links and archaeological finds.^ As the new clerics became the chroniclers, the old religion was systematically lost before it was recorded and today our knowledge of it is largely based on surviving texts, etymological links and archaeological finds.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ As the new clerics became the chroniclers, the old religion was lost before it was recorded and today our knowledge of it is sketchy.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ The new Norman Kings made Norman the official language of all government settings but the Anglo Saxons retained their ''Old English'' which eventually merged and became ''Middle English''.
  • Are White North Americans/Britons Anglo Saxons or Normans (ancient, Romans, influence) - History - U.S. and World, studying past, wars, presidents, language, economy - City-Data Forum 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.city-data.com [Source type: General]

One of the few recorded references is that a Kentish King would only meet the missionary St. Augustine in the open air, where he would be under the protection of the sky god, Woden. .Written Christian prohibitions on acts of paganism are one of historians' main sources of information on pre-Christian beliefs.^ Written Christian prohibitions on acts of pagan worship are one of our main sources of information on pre-Christian beliefs.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ Written Christian prohibitions on acts of paganism are one of our main sources of information on pre-Christian beliefs.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Hereward legend, interwoven between fact and fable is also in many ways a pre-Christian memory of pagan Britain.
  • Anglo-Saxon : British Pride 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.britishpride.org [Source type: Original source]

.Despite these prohibitions, numerous elements of the pre-Christian culture of the Anglo-Saxon people survived the Christianisation process.^ Anglo-Saxon culture?
  • Anglo-Saxon Literature 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.stjohns-chs.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These tribes are also known as the Anglo Saxons.
  • Dewi Widyastuti, S.Pd., M.Hum. 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.english.usd.ac.id [Source type: Original source]

^ Despite the growth of Christianity, the Anglo-Saxon religion remained strong.

Examples include the English language names for days of the week:
  • Tiw, the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Tyr: Tuesday
  • Woden, the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Odin: Wednesday
  • Þunor, the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Thor: Thursday
  • *Fríge, the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Frigg: Friday

Contemporary meanings

."Anglo-Saxon" in linguistics is still used as a term for the original West Germanic component of the modern English language, which was later expanded and developed through the influence of Old Norse and Norman French, though linguists now more often refer to it as Old English.^ Early Modern English develops.
  • Words in English :: History 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.ruf.rice.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Its disjunctive use is modern; but its original sense is still in use and perfectly proper.
  • A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language - Wikisource 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The relationship of Old Norse to English and other languages .
  • Rob's Old Norse Page 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC odin.bio.miami.edu [Source type: Original source]

.In the 19th century the term "Anglo-Saxon" was broadly used in philology, and is sometimes so used at present.^ The present English language was from the old English, the language used by the Anglo Saxons.
  • Dewi Widyastuti, S.Pd., M.Hum. 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.english.usd.ac.id [Source type: Original source]

^ Subject term: Civilization, Anglo-Saxon.
  • ITEM REPORT 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.stcva.org [Source type: Academic]

^ By 1800 "Anglo-Saxon" was the term used for the Old English language.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In Victorian Britain, some writers such as Robert Knox, James Anthony Froude, Charles Kingsley[9] and Edward A. Freeman [10] used the term "Anglo-Saxon" to justify racism and imperialism, claiming that the "Anglo-Saxon" ancestry of the English made them racially superior to the colonised peoples.^ He discovered in Anglo-Saxons an overwhelming superiority over the peoples in tropical areas.
  • Voices for Imperialism: Josiah Strong and the Protestant Clergy 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC spider.georgetowncollege.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The present English language was from the old English, the language used by the Anglo Saxons.
  • Dewi Widyastuti, S.Pd., M.Hum. 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.english.usd.ac.id [Source type: Original source]

^ Anglo-Saxon monarchs * Anglophile * English people * Saxons * States in Medieval Britain .
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Similar racist ideas were advocated in the 19th Century United States by Samuel George Morton and George Fitzhugh.^ As a result of the military, economic, scientific, political and cultural influence of the British Empire during the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries and of the United States since the late 19th century, it has become the lingua franca in many parts of the world.
  • http://getglue.com/topics/p/english_language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC getglue.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ As a result of the military, economic, scientific, political, and cultural influence of the British Empire during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries and of the United States since the mid 20th century, it has become the lingua franca in many parts of the world.
  • The English Language - Kosmix : Reference, Videos, Images, News, Shopping and more... 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.kosmix.com [Source type: General]

^ The fear of British imperial tyranny was older than the United States and still audible at any Fourth of July address in the late nineteenth century.
  • Paul A. Kramer | Empires, Exceptions, and Anglo-Saxons: Race and Rule between the British and United States Empires, 1880?1910 | The Journal of American History, 88.4 | The History Cooperative 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.historycooperative.org [Source type: Original source]

[11]
."Anglo-Saxon" is also used to refer to any of the modern peoples of the British Isles, plus all of their descendants throughout the world.^ They are now referred to as the Anglo-Saxons.
  • Neil Fick Synthesis Tutorial 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.sebsteph.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For convenience, we can refer to them as Anglo-Saxons.
  • Brief History of English 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.sebsteph.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Ancestral voices: the Anglo-Saxon peoples .

.The definition has varied from time to time and varies from place to place.^ He had met with several Americans, who, at various times, had come on pilgrimages to this place, and he had been in correspondence with others.
  • Our Old Home: a series of English sketches, Nathaniel Hawthorne, 1863, 1883 24 January 2010 1:12 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: Original source]

^ A third problem is the fact that definitions of "bilingual," "ESL," and "immersion" vary hugely from state to state and district to district — at times, even from classroom to classroom.
  • Colorín Colorado :: Teaching English-Language Learners: What Does the Research Say? 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.colorincolorado.org [Source type: Academic]

^ He wrote it in the 1940's and it has been published at various times in various places.
  • Fun with the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.lifesmith.com [Source type: Original source]

.In contemporary Anglophone cultures outside the United Kingdom, the term is most commonly found in certain contexts, such as the term "White Anglo-Saxon Protestant" or "WASP". Such terms are often politicised, and bear little connection to the precise ethnological or historical definition of the term "Anglo-Saxon". It often encapsulates socio-economic identifiers more than ethnic ones.^ Anglo-Saxon culture?
  • Anglo-Saxon Literature 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.stjohns-chs.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Subject term: Civilization, Anglo-Saxon.
  • ITEM REPORT 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.stcva.org [Source type: Academic]

^ The anglo-saxon kingdoms were monarchies.

.Outside Anglophone countries, both in Europe and in the rest of the world, the term "Anglo-Saxon" and its direct translations are used to refer to the Anglophone peoples and societies of Britain, the United States, and other countries such as Australia, Canada and New Zealand.^ I use the term universal to mean widespread outside the countries where it is native.
  • The dominance of the English language continues | Antimoon Forum 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.antimoon.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They are now referred to as the Anglo-Saxons.
  • Neil Fick Synthesis Tutorial 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.sebsteph.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Subject term: Civilization, Anglo-Saxon.
  • ITEM REPORT 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.stcva.org [Source type: Academic]

.The term can be used in a variety of contexts, often to identify the English-speaking world's distinctive language, culture, technology, wealth, markets, economy, and legal systems.^ English language and culture .
  • English language and culture 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.lonweb.org [Source type: General]

^ Today English is the worlds language.
  • History of the English Language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.byfaith.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

^ It is a wide ranging term, taking in the English-speaking world's language, culture, technology, wealth, influence, markets and economy.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

Local variations include the French "Anglo-Saxon" and the Spanish "anglosajón".
.As with the English language use of the term, what constitutes the "Anglo-Saxon" varies from speaker to speaker.^ English is a West Germanic language that developed from Old English , the language of the Anglo-Saxons .
  • yawiki.org entry for English language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The present English language was from the old English, the language used by the Anglo Saxons.
  • Dewi Widyastuti, S.Pd., M.Hum. 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.english.usd.ac.id [Source type: Original source]

^ English is a West Germanic language that developed from Old English , the language of the Anglo-Saxons.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ BBC - History - Anglo-Saxons
  2. ^ English and Welsh are races apart
  3. ^ Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Chap XV
  4. ^ The Monarchy of England: Volume I – The Beginnings by David Starkey (extract at Channel 4 programme 'Monarchy')
  5. ^ The Life of King Alfred
  6. ^ Page not found
  7. ^ The History of Wales, John Davies, Penguin Books, 1990. ISBN01.2570 1
  8. ^ Ancient Britain Had Apartheid-Like Society, Study Suggests
  9. ^ Rule of Darkness: British Literature and Imperialism, 1830-1914 by Patrick Brantlinger. Cornell University Press, 1990
  10. ^ Race and Empire in British Politics by Paul B. Rich. CUP Archive, 1990
  11. ^ Race and Manifest Destiny: The Origins of American Racial Anglo-Saxonism by Reginald Horsman.Harvard University Press, 1981. (pgs. 126,273)

References

  • Oppenheimer, Stephen. The Origins of the British(2006). Constable and Robinson, London. ISBN 1-84529-158-1

Further reading

.
  • D. Whitelock, English Historical Documents c.500–1042, (London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1955)
  • Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People, trans.^ Even a work like Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People was under this influence.
    • EIPS - The language of the English Authorised Version (KJV) of the Holy Bible is unsurpassably pre-eminent being the first from the well undefiled and indeed the very well itself. 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.ianpaisley.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The history of English is an aspect of the history of the English people and their development.
    • English language Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about English language 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Anglik English language resource ^ "Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England .
    • English language @ Top40-Charts.info 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.top40-charts.info [Source type: Original source]

    L. Sherly-Price, (London: Penguin, 1990)
  • F.M. Stenton, Anglo-Saxon England, 3rd edition, (Oxford: University Press, 1971)
  • J. Campbell et al., The Anglo-Saxons, (London: Penguin, 1991)
  • E. James, Britain in the First Millennium, (London: Arnold, 2001)
  • M. Lapidge et al., The Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Anglo-Saxon England, (Oxford: Blackwell, 1999)
  • Donald Henson, The Origins of the Anglo-Saxons, (Anglo-Saxon Books, 2006)

External links

.

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Anglo-Saxons (or Anglo-Saxon) is the term usually used to describe the invading tribes in the south and east of Great Britain from the early 5th century AD, and their creation of the English nation, to the Norman conquest of 1066.

Sourced

.
  • By the Lord before whom this sanctuary is holy, I will to N. be true and faithful, and love all which he loves and shun all which he shuns, according to the laws of God and the order of the world.^ Narratives beginning from the creation of the world Man’s separation from God Manifestations of God’s grace and love.

    ^ Thereafter one may instruct in Latin those whom one wishes to teach further and wishes to advance to holy orders.
    • Christian Heroism and the West Saxon Achievement: The Old English Poetic Evidence 24 January 2010 1:12 UTC www.sfsu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Tell her to reap it with a sickle of leather, Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme, Then tie it all up with a peacock feather, For then she'll be a true love of mine.

    .Nor will I ever with will or action, through word or deed, do anything which is unpleasing to him, on condition that he will hold to me as I shall deserve it, and that he will perform everything as it was in our agreement when I submitted myself to him and chose his will.^ The Strelets website shows him holding a sword, but this does not seem a likely position to be in, and if anything we thought it would look better if he was being run through by a lance and is simply gripping the weapon as he suffers the mortal blow.

    ^ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749 - 1832) Deeds, not words shall speak me.
    • Language Quotes - The Quotations Page 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.quotationspage.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many more Celtic words have come into our language indirectly through French channels.
    • English Language - Foreign Elements 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.oldandsold.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Anglo-Saxon oath of fealty.^ Anglo-Saxon Heathenry Social Structure of the Theod Social Classes of the Theod Oaths Virtues About Theodish Belief Anglo-Saxon Pagan Calendar .
      • Anglo-Saxon Heathenry 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.englatheod.org [Source type: Original source]
      • The Anglo-Saxon PaganCalendar 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.englatheod.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .An oath of fealty is what knights said to their lord as a promise of loyalty.^ Loyalty lay at the heart of the feudal system. Landowners extracted loyalty from their serfs, lords expected loyalty from Knights, and the King expected loyalty from everyone. Is loyalty important in today’s society?
      • Mrs. Wood’s Blog » English 12 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC henricoenglish.com [Source type: General]

      [1]

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

.ANGLO-SAXONS. The term "Anglo-Saxon" is commonly applied to that period of English history, language and literature which preceded the Norman Conquest.^ Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of Anglo-Saxons or their descendants, or their language or culture; English.
  • Zionist Freedom Alliance - Globalization and the Maccabees 1 October 2009 3:53 UTC www.zfa.org.il [Source type: Original source]

^ History of the English Language books (e.
  • Teachers of Old English in Britain and Ireland (TOEBI): A Survey about Learning Practices in Old English, July 2009 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC spreadsheets.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ '''English''' is a West Germanic language that developed in England during History of Anglo-Saxon England.
  • English Language - Home - oo.vg 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC english-language.oo.vg [Source type: Original source]

.It goes back to the time of King Alfred, who seems to have frequently used the title rex Anglorum Saxonum or rex Angul-Saxonum. The origin of this title is not quite clear.^ He used titles such as Rex Angul-Saxonum and Rex Anglorum Saxonum – King of the Anglo-Saxons.

^ It goes back to the time of King Alfred, who seems to have frequently used the title rex Anglorum Saxonum or rex Angul-Saxonum.
  • Anglo-Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC chestofbooks.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The origin of this title is not quite clear.
  • Anglo-Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC chestofbooks.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.It is generally believed to have arisen from the final union of the various kingdoms under Alfred in 886. Bede (Hist.^ It is generally believed to have arisen from the union of six of the seven kingdoms of the Heptarchy under Alfred in 886 .
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ It is generally believed to have arisen from the final union of the various kingdoms under Alfred in 886.
  • Anglo-Saxons - LoveToKnow 1911 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC chestofbooks.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The English leader who finally thwarted them is generally reckoned as the first King of England and the only King to be called ‘Great’ - Alfred (cAD849-899) .
  • Church Society - Issues - History - Christians in England - The Anglo-Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.churchsociety.org [Source type: Original source]

Eccl. i.
.15) states that the people of the more northern kingdoms (East Anglia, Mercia, Northumbria, &c.^ East Anglia ruled directly from Mercia.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ Northumbria and East Anglia fall to the Danes .
  • All About Romance Novels - Scottish Monarchs of the Middle Ages 11 September 2009 22:13 UTC www.likesbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Slay kings of Northumbria and East Anglia, subjugate king of Mercia.
  • Words in English :: History 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.ruf.rice.edu [Source type: Original source]

) belonged to the .Angli, while those of Essex, Sussex and Wessex were sprung from the Saxons, and those of Kent and southern Hampshire from the Jutes.^ Essex , Sussex and Wessex were sprung from the Saxons , who came from the region of Old Saxony .
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These Saxon kingdoms included Essex, Middlesex, Sussex and Wessex.
  • Anglo-Saxon : British Pride 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.britishpride.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Saxons of ancient Wessex, Essex, Middlesex, and Sussex.
  • Anglo-saxon Definition | Definition of Anglo-saxon at Dictionary.com 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC dictionary.reference.com [Source type: Original source]

.Other early writers, however, do not observe these distinctions, and neither in language nor in custom do we find evidence of any appreciable differences between the two former groups, though in custom Kent presents most remarkable contrasts with the other kingdoms.^ Other early writers, however, do not observe these distinctions, and neither in language nor in custom do we find evidence of any appreciable differences between the two former groups, though in custom Kent presents most remarkable contrasts with the other kingdoms.
  • Anglo-Saxons - LoveToKnow 1911 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC chestofbooks.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Other early writers do not bear out consistent distinctions, though in custom the Kingdom of Kent presents the most remarkable contrasts with the other kingdoms.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The other resemblances which I have remarked between these two languages are:- .
  • Turner: On the Asiatic Origin of the Anglo-Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.abcog.org [Source type: Original source]

.Still more curious is the fact that West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc, while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia.^ Still more curious is the fact that West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc, while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia .

^ West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc , while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia in the north.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ Still more curious is the fact that West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc, while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia.
  • Anglo-Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC chestofbooks.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.On the other hand, it is by no means impossible that the distinction drawn by Bede was based solely on the names Essex (East Seaxan), East Anglia, &c.^ On the other hand, it is by no means impossible that the distinction drawn by Bede was based solely on the names Essex (East Seaxan), East Anglia, etc.
  • Anglo-Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC chestofbooks.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ On the other hand, it is by no means impossible that the distinction drawn by Bede was based solely on the names Essex (East Seaxan), East Anglia , &c.

^ On the other hand, it is by no means impossible that the distinction drawn by Bede was based solely on names such as Essex (East Saxons) and East Anglia (East Angles).
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.We need not doubt that the Angli and the Saxons were different nations originally; but from the evidence at our disposal it seems likely that they had practically coalesced in very early times, perhaps even before the invasion.^ This haplotype is very rare, but most likely Anglo-Saxon in origin.

^ The Anglo-Saxons can do whatever they like.
  • MEET THE DOCTOR - PART II 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC dailyreckoning.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They are very different from each other.
  • SGI Quarterly | Old English Poetry 24 January 2010 1:12 UTC www.sgiquarterly.org [Source type: Original source]

.At all events the term Angli Saxones seems to have first come into use on the continent, where we find it, nearly a century before Alfred's time, in the writings of Paulus Diaconus (Paul the Deacon).^ Where did the term "Anglo-Saxon" come from?
  • What tribes make up the Anglo-Saxons? | Smart QandA: Answers and facts you can trust, verified with Encyclopedia.com 1 October 2009 3:53 UTC qanda.encyclopedia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • What were the names of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms? | Smart QandA: Answers and facts you can trust, verified with Encyclopedia.com 10 September 2009 21:46 UTC qanda.encyclopedia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The term was used from earliest times without distinction for all the Gmc.
  • English Definition | Definition of English at Dictionary.com 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC dictionary.reference.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The time for discrimination seems to be now come.
  • English language history 16 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.yaelf.com [Source type: Original source]

.There can be little doubt, however, that there it was used to distinguish the Teutonic inhabitants of Britain from the Old Saxons of the continent.^ There can be little doubt, however, that there it was used to distinguish the Teutonic inhabitants of Britain from the Old Saxons of the continent.
  • Anglo-Saxons - LoveToKnow 1911 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC chestofbooks.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There can be little doubt, however, that there it was used to distinguish the inhabitants of Britain from the Old Saxons of the continent.
  • Anglo-Saxons at AllExperts 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Anglo-Saxons - on Opentopia, a free Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC encycl.opentopia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There can be little doubt, however, that there it was used to distinguish the Teutonic inhabitants of Great Britain from the Old Saxons of the continent.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

.See W. H. Stevenson, Asser's Life of King Alfred (Oxford, 1904, pp.^ Asser's report blaming thelbald may have been due to the chronicler's evident disapproval of the king's marrying his stepmother after his father's death (see below).
  • ENGLAND, ANGLO-SAXON KINGS 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC fmg.ac [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Asser helps to enhance the literary status of the English Court and also to negotiate the recognition of Alfred as overlord of the South Welsh Kings.
  • Anglo-Saxons - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia 10 February 2010 11:22 UTC www.tvwiki.tv [Source type: Original source]

^ Filed under: Anglo-Saxons Anglo-Saxon Britain , by Grant Allen (Gutenberg text and illustrated HTML) Filed under: Anglo-Saxons -- England -- Wessex -- Kings and rulers -- Biography The Life of King Alfred , by John Asser, trans.

148 ff.); H. Munro Chadwick, The Origin of the English Nation (Cambridge, 1907); also BRITAIN, Anglo-Saxon. (H. M. C.)


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Noun

Anglo-Saxons
  1. Plural form of Anglo-Saxon.

Simple English

File:Sutton.hoo.
The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. Based on a Roman parade helmet design (of a general class known as spangenhelm), it has decorations like those found in contemporary Swedish helmets found at Old Uppsala (Collection of the British Museum)

Anglo-Saxon means usually the culturally and similar language speaking peoples living in the south and east of the island Great Britain (modern England) from around the mid-5th century AD to the Norman conquest of 1066.

They are thought to have spoken Germanic languages and are identified by Bede as the descendants of three powerful tribes, Angles, Saxons, and Jutes.

= Anglo-Saxon migration

=

File:Britain peoples circa
The main Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms circa A.D. 600

There is a quite big debate as to the how much Anglo-Saxon migration there was from the 4th century to the 6th century. The first theories said large numbers of Anglo-Saxon settlers arrived, basically killing or moving the British people living in south and east of Britain. Such an idea is supported by the language related and place-name evidence. In terms of language, Old English became the language of the English kingdoms, but a few Brythonic words became part of the language. The small amount of of settlement names with Brythonic origins (instead of villages taking the name of a nearby stream with a Celtic name etc.) over most of England is taken by some as evidence of Saxon settlement rather than continuity.

File:Beowulf.
First page of Beowulf.

More recently the focus has shifted towards continuity, trying to place Britain in the context of European Late Antiquity. Some of this argument is based on scale. The population of Britain in 400 is unknowable, but is carefully guessed, based on land usage, to have been around 2 million people. It is thought to be unlikely that such a large population was all together killed or displaced between the 5th century and sixth century.[1] Much of the argument for continuity is based on archaeological evidence.

References

  1. Disease epidemics very much could have reduced the population of Britain. There is recent analysed evidence for multiple events of plague and famine - e.g. Irish Annals, Gildas, and Bede's account of the plague in his youth - which are also known from Mediterranean sources.

Other websites


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 10, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Anglo-Saxons, which are similar to those in the above article.








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