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Animated films in the United States date back to at least 1906 when Vitagraph released Humorous Phases of Funny Faces.[1] Although early animations were rudimentary they rapidly became more sophisticated with such classics as Gertie the Dinosaur in 1914 and Koko the Clown.

Originally a novelty, some early animated silents depicted magic acts or were strongly influenced by the comic strip. Later, they were distributed along with newsreels. Early animation films, like their live-action silent cousins, would come with a musical score to be played by an organist or even an orchestra in larger theatres.[2]

Contents

List of animated silents

Gertie on Tour

See also

Further reading

  • Denis Gifford (1990). American Animated Films: The Silent Era, 1897-1929. Mcfarland & Co. ISBN 0899504604.  
  • Richard Fleischer (2005). Out of the Inkwell: Max Fleischer and the Animation Revolution. University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 0-8131-2355-0.  
  • Donald Crafton (1993). Before Mickey: The Animated Film 1898-1928. University of Chicago Press.  

References

  1. ^ a b Jeff Lenburg 1991 The Encyclopedia of Animated Cartoons ISBN 0-8160-2252-6
  2. ^ Janis Johnson (January/February 2005). "Saving the silents". Humanities magazine (National Endowment for the Humanities). http://www.neh.gov/news/humanities/2005-01/savingsilents.html. Retrieved 2008-03-17.  

External links

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Animated films in the United States date back to at least 1906 when Vitagraph released Humorous Phases of Funny Faces.[1] Although early animations were rudimentary they rapidly became more sophisticated with such classics as Gertie the Dinosaur in 1914, Felix the Cat, and Koko the Clown.

Originally a novelty, some early animated silents depicted magic acts or were strongly influenced by the comic strip. Later, they were distributed along with newsreels. Early animation films, like their live-action silent cousins, would come with a musical score to be played by an organist or even an orchestra in larger theatres.[2]

Contents

List of animated silents

See also

Further reading

  • Denis Gifford (1990). American Animated Films: The Silent Era, 1897-1929. Mcfarland & Co. ISBN 0899504604. 
  • Richard Fleischer (2005). Out of the Inkwell: Max Fleischer and the Animation Revolution. University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 0-8131-2355-0. 
  • Donald Crafton (1993). Before Mickey: The Animated Film 1898-1928. University of Chicago Press. 

References

  1. ^ a b Jeff Lenburg 1991 The Encyclopedia of Animated Cartoons ISBN 0-8160-2252-6
  2. ^ Janis Johnson (January/February 2005). "Saving the silents". Humanities magazine (National Endowment for the Humanities). http://www.neh.gov/news/humanities/2005-01/savingsilents.html. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 

External links


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