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Anna the Jagiellonian
On a 1595 painting by Marcin Kober, oil on canvas
Co-Monarch of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth as King of Poland & Grand Duke of Lithuania
Reign 15 December 1575 - 1586
Coronation 1 May 1576 in Krakow
Predecessor Henry of Valois
Interrex 1574 - 1575
Successor Interrex 1586 - 1587
Sigismund III Vasa 1587
Spouse Stefan Batory
Dynasty Jagiellon
Father Sigismund I the Old
Mother Bona Sforza
Born 18 October 1523(1523-10-18)
Kraków, Poland
Died 9 September 1596 (aged 72)
Warsaw, Poland
Burial Wawel Cathedral

Anna the Jagiellonian (Polish: Anna Jagiellonka, Lithuanian: Ona Jogailaitė; 1523–1596), daughter of Poland's King Sigismund I the Old, wife of Stefan Batory. She was elected, along with her then fiance, Stefan Batory, as co-ruler in the second election of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Anna was the last member of the Jagiellon dynasty.

Contents

Royal titles

  • Royal titles, in Latin: "Anna Dei gratia Infans Regni Poloniae."

Biography

Engraving by Dominicus Custos

Anna was born in 1523 to the Jagiellon King, Sigismund I the Old and his wife Bona Sforza.[1] Her early life was rather mundane. She embroidered church vestments, was involved in works of charity, and fulfilled her obligations as a princess. Anna gave up her suitor the King of Sweden in favour of her sister Katherine. Anna remained unmarried until the age of fifty-two. Thirty-three years at the side of her overbearing mother had taught her not only patience and calmness, but also the conviction that a woman could be as good a monarch as a man.[1]

However, in 1572, her brother Sigismund II Augustus died, leaving the thrones to the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth vacant.[1] In 1572 Jean Montluc, Bishop of Valence, offered Henry Valois to the electors of the commonwealth as the next King. Montluc promised the electors that Henry would marry Anna, "to maintain the dynastic tradition".[2] Unfortunately, for Anna, after Henry Valois was elected as the first monarch in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, he withdrew his promise and they never wed.[1] In June of 1574 Henry left Poland to assume his new duties as King of France and by May of 1575 the Parliament of the Commonwealth had removed him as their monarch.[3]

By the autumn of 1575 a new candidate was offered to the electors of the commonwealth, Stefan Batory, Prince of Transylvania.[4] Stefan had to agree to the condition that he would marry Anna the Jagiellonian, which he did.[1][4] On 15 December 1575, near Warsaw, Anna along with Stefan Batory, her fiance, was elected as co-rulers, as the second monarch in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth with the dual title of King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania[4] The coronation took place in Krakow 1 May 1576.[5]

With the death of her husband in 1586, she had one final play to influence the thrones of the Commonwealth. She put forth, to the electors, Sigismund III Vasa, the only son of her youngest sister, Catherine Jagellon of Poland, Queen of Sweden.[1] With Anna's help he gained the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth thrones as the third elected monarch.[1]

Anna died, during her nephew Sigismund's reign, in her own country, where she had been born and had lived, on 9 September 1596.[1] She was the last member of the Jagiellons.[1]

Warsaw was Anna's main residence before it became the capital and she embellished the city by funding the construction of a variety of structures, many of which still exist today. She also funded several distinguished tomb monuments in the Wawel Cathedral, including the monument of her brother King Sigismund Augustus, her own monument in Sigismund's Chapel (both 1574–1575, Santi Gucci) and her husband Stefan Batory in the Chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary (1586, Santi Gucci) as well as the tomb of mother Bona Sforza in the Basilica di San Nicola in Bari (1593). In 1586 (ten years after it was painted) she ordered that a portrait of her in coronation robes be placed in the Sigismund's Chapel.[6]

Ancestors

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jogaila
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Casimir IV Jagiellon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sophia of Halshany
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sigismund I the Old
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Albert II of Germany
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Elisabeth of Austria
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Elisabeth of Bohemia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Anna the Jagiellonian
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Galeazzo Maria Sforza
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gian Galeazzo Sforza
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bona of Savoy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bona Sforza
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alfonso II of Naples
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Isabella of Naples
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ippolita Maria Sforza
 
 
 
 
 
 

Gallery

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Anna Jagiellonka (1523 – 1596)". Government of Poland. http://www.poland.gov.pl/Anna,Jagiellonka,(1523,–,1596),1960.html. Retrieved 2009-08-24.  
  2. ^ Stone, Daniel (2001). The Polish-Lithuanian state, 1386-1795 [A History of East Central Europe, Volume IV.]. Seattle: University of Washington Press. pp. 118. ISBN 0295980931.  
  3. ^ Stone, Daniel (2001). The Polish-Lithuanian state, 1386-1795 [A History of East Central Europe, Volume IV.]. Seattle: University of Washington Press. pp. 121. ISBN 0295980931.  
  4. ^ a b c Stone, Daniel (2001). The Polish-Lithuanian state, 1386-1795 [A History of East Central Europe, Volume IV.]. Seattle: University of Washington Press. pp. 122. ISBN 0295980931.  
  5. ^ Stone, Daniel (2001). The Polish-Lithuanian state, 1386-1795 [A History of East Central Europe, Volume IV.]. Seattle: University of Washington Press. pp. 123. ISBN 0295980931.  
  6. ^ WAWEL 1000-2000. Kultura artystyczna dworu królewskiego i katedry. Sala IV. Portrety rodowe. (Polish)
  7. ^ Kaplica Zygmuntowska (Polish)

See also

Anna the Jagiellonian
Born: 18 October 1523 Died: 9 September 1596
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Henry III Walezy
King of Poland
1575 – 1586
With: Stefan Batory
Succeeded by
Sigismund III Vasa
Grand Duke of Lithuania
1575 – 1586
With: Stefan Batory
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This article is about the queen regnant of Poland, for others with similar names, see Anna of Poland (disambiguation).
Anna Jagiellon
File:Martin Kober
On a 1595 painting by Marcin Kober, oil on canvas
Born October 18, 1523(1523-10-18)
in Kraków, Poland
Died September 9, 1596 (aged 72)
in Warsaw, Poland
Buried Wawel Cathedral
Reign December 13, 1575
to September 9, 1596
Coronation May 1, 1576
in Kraków
Family or dynasty Jagiellon dynasty
Coat of Arms Pogoń Litewska.
Parents Sigismund I of Poland
Bona Sforza
Marriage and children with Stefan Batory:
 

Anna Jagiellon (Polish: Anna Jagiellonka, Lithuanian: Ona Jogailaitė; 1523–1596), daughter of Poland's King Zygmunt I the Old, elected King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania, wife of Stefan Batory, was the last legitimate member of the Jagiellon dynasty.

She became Queen of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and was an heir to the Kingdom of Jerusalem.

Contents

Royal titles

  • Royal titles, in Latin: "Anna Dei gratia Infans Regni Poloniae."
  • English translation: "Anna, by the Grace of God, Infanta of the Kingdom of Poland."

Biography

Anna was a spinster when her brother King Zygmunt II August died. On December 13, 1575 she was elected in Warsaw King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania. In 1576 she married Stefan Batory (1533–1586) at Wawel, then Reigning Prince of Transylvania, who became de jure uxoris King and Anne's co-monarch. She survived her husband and died childless.

Her heir was the only son of her youngest sister, Catherine of Poland, Queen of Sweden - Sigismund Vasa. Anna helped him, after her husband's death, gain the Polish throne as Sigismund III Vasa.

Anna died during her nephew Sigismund's reign, in her own country where she had been born and had lived.

Anna Jagiellon is one of the persons who figure in a famous painting by Jan Matejko depicting the preaching of Piotr Skarga.

Warsaw was Anna's main residence before it became the capital and she embellished the city by funding the construction of a variety of structures, many of which still exist today. She also funded several distinguished tomb monuments in the Wawel Cathedral, including the monument of her brother King Sigismund Augustus, her own monument in Sigismund's Chapel (both 1574–1575, Santi Gucci) and her husband Stefan Batory in the Chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary (1586, Santi Gucci) as well as the tomb of mother Bona Sforza in the Basilica di San Nicola in Bari (1593). In 1586 (ten years after it was painted) she ordered that a portrait of her in coronation robes be placed in the Sigismund's Chapel.[1]

Ancestors

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jogaila
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Casimir IV Jagiellon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sophia of Halshany
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sigismund I the Old
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Albert II of Germany
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Elisabeth of Austria
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Elisabeth of Bohemia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Anna Jagiellon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Galeazzo Maria Sforza
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gian Galeazzo Sforza
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bona of Savoy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bona Sforza
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alfonso II of Naples
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Isabella of Naples
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ippolita Maria Sforza
 
 
 
 
 
 

Gallery

References

See also

Template:Commonscat

Template:Start box |-

| colspan="3" style="background: #FFD700; text-align:center;" |
Anna Jagiellon
Born: 18 October 1523 Died: 9 September 1596

|- ! colspan="3" style="background: #ACE777;" | Regnal titles |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="2"|Preceded by
Henry III Walezy |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Queen of Poland
together with Stefan Batory
1575–1586 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="2"| Succeeded by
Sigismund III Vasa |- |- |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Grand Duchess of Lithuania
together with Stefan Batory
1575–1586 Template:End box


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