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Anthony Sayer (c.1672 - 1741/2). On 24 June 1717 (the Feast of St. John the Baptist), at the formation of the first Premier Grand Lodge of England of freemasons at London, the members present elected as their first Grand Master "Antony Sayer, Gentleman," "about whom less definite information is known than any of his successors in that high office."[1]. Although it later became known as "The Grand Lodge of England," this new "Grand Lodge" was formed to regulate only those constituent lodges in London and Westminster, the territorial aspirations of the founders being quite limited. It was therefore not referred to as "the Grand Lodge of England" at this early period.

It is clear that from the outset the Masons sought a high ranking brother as Grand Master. However, Sayer's rank as a gentleman evidently exceeded his means. He was a member of the Lodge at the Apple Tree Tavern (now the Lodge of Fortitude and Old Cumberland No. 12), and not the aristocratic Rummer & Grapes. Although appointed Senior Grand Warden in 1719, he served as Tyler (door guard) of the Old King's Arms Lodge No. 28, and petitioned the Lodge for support in 1736 and 1740, and petitioned Grand Lodge for charity in 1724, 1730 and 1741.

The Old King's Arms Lodge minutes of January 6, 1742 record his death during the previous month. His funeral was attended by a large number of Freemasons "of the best quality" and he was "decently interred in Covent Garden Church."

References

  1. ^ Anthony Sayer
Masonic offices
Preceded by
New office
Grand Master of the Premier
Grand Lodge of England

1717–1718
Succeeded by
George Payne

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