Antonio McDyess: Wikis

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Antonio McDyess
Mcdyess free throw.jpg
McDyess in a 2008 game against the Washington Wizards.
San Antonio Spurs  – No. 34
Power Forward
Born September 7, 1974 (1974-09-07) (age 35)
Quitman, Mississippi
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)
Listed weight 245 lb (111 kg)
High school Quitman
College Alabama
Draft 2nd overall, 1995
Los Angeles Clippers
Pro career 1995–present
Former teams Denver Nuggets (1995–1997, 1998–2002)
Phoenix Suns (1997–1998, 2004)
New York Knicks (2002–2004)
Detroit Pistons (2004-2009)
Awards 1-time All-Star (2001)
1996 NBA All-Rookie First Team

All-NBA Third Team (1999)
Olympic medal record
Men's basketball
Gold 2000 Sydney United States

Antonio Keithflen McDyess (born September 7, 1974, in Quitman, Mississippi) is an American professional basketball player. McDyess is listed at 6'9" (2.06 m), 245 lb. (111 kg) and is a power forward. He has recently signed with the San Antonio Spurs.

Contents

Playing career

As a prep, McDyess was one of the top 30 players nationally, and made the Magic Johnson Roundball Classic.McDyess played college basketball at the University of Alabama. In 1995 he was drafted by the Los Angeles Clippers as the second pick in the NBA Draft and was traded to the Denver Nuggets before the season began for fellow power forward Rodney Rogers and a mid-first round pick that turned out to be Brent Barry. McDyess's explosive leaping and power dunking ability allowed him to average 17.8 points and 8.8 rebounds per game over his first six seasons. In 1997, before his third year, McDyess was traded to the Phoenix Suns. He returned to the Nuggets as a free agent the next season. However, his return was not without controversy. During the NBA lockout in the winter of 1999, he was negotiating with both the Suns and Nuggets. He and the Nuggets had a verbal agreement for Antonio to return to Denver. However, he had second thoughts, and considered re-signing with the Suns. According to Sports Illustrated, McDyess invited Jason Kidd, Rex Chapman, and George McCloud to Denver to talk things over. While attending an Avalanche hockey game at McNichols Arena, Dan Issel told security to not let the three Suns players into the building. Without any further consultation, he re-signed with the Nuggets. In 1999, McDyess became just the third Nugget to average at least 20 points and 10 rebounds for a season, after Dan Issel in 1977–78 and George McGinnis in 1978–79. Considered an up and comer, the quiet McDyess was selected to be a part of the gold-winning U.S. Olympic men's basketball team at the 2000 Summer Olympics (as a replacement for injured Tim Duncan).

Early in the 2001–2002 season McDyess suffered a serious knee injury, a Patellar tendon rupture, that required season-ending surgery. McDyess struggled to play through the injury, re-aggravating it several times and going through additional surgeries over the next few seasons. He was sidelined due to injury for the remainder of the 2001–2002 season as well as the entire 2002–2003 NBA season. McDyess was traded to the Knicks on June 26, 2002[1] in exchange for Marcus Camby, Mark Jackson and the draft rights to Nenê, the seventh overall pick in the 2002 NBA Draft. McDyess began the 2002–2003 season as a highly anticipated addition to the New York Knicks. But on October 8, 2002, with 1 minute 55 seconds left in an exhibition game against Phoenix, McDyess reinjured the knee while dunking a rebound.[2] He would undergo another surgery four days later. In the 2003-2004 season, McDyess was traded to the Phoenix Suns after just 18 games with the Knicks in an eight-player deal that brought Stephon Marbury to New York.[3] He remained healthy while in Phoenix for the remainder of the 2003–2004 season and became an unrestricted free agent in the summer of 2004. In the 2004 offseason, his knee was declared healthy and the Detroit Pistons signed him for the full mid-level exception.

As a member of the Pistons, McDyess was successful in reinventing his game. In his first season with the Pistons, McDyess became a dependable sixth man, averaging 9.6 points and 6.3 rebounds per 23.3 minutes. He relied mostly on mid-range and turn-around jumpers, but remained an efficient scorer, with a 51.3% FG% (ranked 13th in the NBA) in his first season with the Pistons. In 2007–08, following the departure of Chris Webber, McDyess became the Pistons' starting power forward.

On November 3, 2008, McDyess returned to the Denver Nuggets when he was traded, along with Chauncey Billups and Cheikh Samb, for Allen Iverson.[4] He was released on November 10 and became a free agent after he cleared the 48-hour waiver window. Although McDyess was eligible to sign with any team except the Pistons, who must wait until December 7, 30 days from when all conditions to the trade were satisfied by the Nuggets and Pistons,[5] his agent told the Associated Press that McDyess would rejoin the Pistons at the end of the 30-day period.[6] McDyess re-signed with the Pistons on December 9.[7] The 6-foot-9 forward/center averaged seven points and two rebounds in two games for Detroit before the trade. The Mississippi native signed with the Pistons after they won the 2004 NBA title and helped them reach the finals in his first season and conference finals in the next three.

The San Antonio Spurs reached an agreement with McDyess on July 8, 2009 to a three year deal worth the mid-level exception.

NBA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field-goal percentage  3P%  3-point field-goal percentage  FT%  Free-throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1995–96 Denver 76 75 30.0 .485 .000 .683 7.5 1.0 .7 1.5 13.4
1996–97 Denver 74 73 34.7 .463 .171 .708 7.3 1.4 .8 1.7 18.3
1997–98 Phoenix 81 81 30.1 .536 .000 .702 7.6 1.3 1.2 1.7 15.1
1998–99 Denver 50 50 38.7 .471 .111 .680 10.7 1.6 1.5 2.3 21.2
1999–00 Denver 81 81 33.3 .507 .000 .626 8.5 2.0 .9 1.7 19.1
2000–01 Denver 70 70 36.5 .495 .000 .700 12.1 2.1 .6 1.5 20.8
2001–02 Denver 10 10 23.6 .573 .000 .818 5.5 1.8 1.0 .8 11.3
2003–04 New York 18 6 23.4 .458 .000 .579 6.6 1.1 .7 .6 8.4
2003–04 Phoenix 24 14 21.1 .484 .000 .516 5.8 .7 1.0 .5 5.8
2004–05 Detroit 77 8 23.3 .513 .000 .656 6.3 .9 .6 .7 9.6
2005–06 Detroit 82 0 21.1 .509 .000 .557 5.3 1.1 .6 .6 7.8
2006–07 Detroit 82 3 21.1 .526 .000 .691 6.0 .9 .7 .8 8.1
2007–08 Detroit 78 78 29.3 .488 .000 .622 8.5 1.1 .8 .7 8.8
2008–09 Detroit 62 30 30.1 .510 .000 .698 9.8 1.3 .7 .8 9.6
Career 865 579 29.0 .498 .123 .670 7.8 1.3 .8 1.1 13.2
All-Star 1 0 15.0 .444 .000 .000 8.0 2.0 1.0 .0 8.0

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1997–98 Phoenix 4 4 36.8 .477 .000 .643 13.3 1.0 .5 1.5 17.8
2004–05 Detroit 25 0 19.8 .486 .000 .694 5.9 .8 .6 .9 8.0
2005–06 Detroit 18 0 20.6 .559 .000 .548 6.1 .6 .4 .7 7.6
2006–07 Detroit 16 0 22.1 .349 .000 .731 7.1 1.1 .7 .9 5.8
2007–08 Detroit 17 11 27.5 .538 .000 .821 7.4 .9 .6 .5 8.9
2008–09 Detroit 4 4 34.0 .523 .000 1.000 8.5 .5 .5 .8 13.0
Career 84 19 23.4 .486 .000 .691 6.9 .8 .6 .8 8.4

References

External links

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