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Apiales
Inflorescence of a wild carrot, Daucus carota, in the Apiaceae family.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Apiales
Nakai
Families

The Apiales are an order of flowering plants. The families given at right are typical of newer classifications, though there is some slight variation, and in particular the Torriceliaceae may be divided. [1] These families are placed within the asterid group of eudicots as circumscribed by the APG II system. Within the asterids, Apiales belongs to an unranked group called the campanulids. [2]

Under this definition well-known members include carrots, celery, parsley, and ivy.

Under the Cronquist system, only the Apiaceae and Araliaceae were included here, and the restricted order was placed among the rosids rather than the asterids. The Pittosporaceae were placed within the Rosales, and many of the other forms within the family Cornaceae. Pennantia was in the family Icacinaceae.

References

  1. ^ Gregory M. Plunkett, Gregory T. Chandler, Porter P. Lowry, Steven M. Pinney, and Taylor S. Sprenkle. 2004. "Recent advances in understanding Apiales and a revised classification". South African Journal of Botany 70(3):371-381.
  2. ^ Richard C. Winkworth, Johannes Lundberg, and Michael J. Donoghue. 2008. "Toward a resolution of Campanulid phylogeny, with special reference to the placement of Dipsacales". Taxon 57(1):53-65.

Sources

  • Chandler, G.T. and G. M. Plunkett. 2004. Evolution in Apiales: nuclear and chloroplast markers together in (almost) perfect harmony. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 144(2):123-147 (abstract available online here).

Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

Translingual

Etymology

formed from Apiaceae (Art 16 ICBN)

Proper noun

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Wikipedia

Apiales

  1. (taxonomy) A taxonomic order within the class Magnoliopsida — many umbelliferous plants.
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Wikispecies

See also

  • Apiaceae (carrot family)
  • Araliaceae (ginseng family)
  • Griseliniaceae
  • Mackinlayaceae
  • Melanophyllaceae
  • Myodocarpaceae
  • Pittosporaceae
  • Torriceliaceae

Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikispecies

Taxonavigation

Classification System: APG II (down to family level)

Main Page
Cladus: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Cladus: Angiospermae
Cladus: Eudicots
Cladus: core eudicots
Cladus: Asterids
Cladus: Euasterids II
Ordo: Apiales
Familiae: Apiaceae - Araliaceae - Aralidiaceae - Griseliniaceae - Myodocarpaceae - Pennantiaceae - Pittosporaceae - Torricelliaceae

Name

Apiales Nakai, Hisi-Shokubutsu: 58. 1930.

Synonyms

  • Ammiales
  • Araliales
  • Aralidiales
  • Griseliniales
  • Pennantiales
  • Pittosporales
  • Torricelliales

Vernacular names

Deutsch: Doldenblütlerartige
Polski: Araliowce, Selerowce, Baldachokwiatowce, Baldaszkowce
Українська: Аралієцвіті
Wikimedia Commons For more multimedia, look at Apiales on Wikimedia Commons.

Simple English

Apiales
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Apiales
Nakai
Families
  • Apiaceae (carrot family)
  • Araliaceae (ginseng family)
  • Aralidiaceae
  • Griseliniaceae
  • Mackinlayaceae
  • Melanophyllaceae
  • Myodocarpaceae
  • Pennantiaceae
  • Pittosporaceae
  • Torricelliaceae

The Apiales are an order of flowering plants. The families given at right are typical of newer classifications, though there is some slight variation, and in particular the Torriceliaceae may be divided. These families are placed within the asterid group of dicotyledons.


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