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Apollonius Molon (or simply Molon; Ancient Greek: Ἀπολλώνιος ὁ Μόλων), Greek rhetorician, who flourished about 70 BC.

He was a native of Alabanda, a pupil of Menecles, and settled at Rhodes. He twice visited Rome as an ambassador from Rhodes, and Marcus Tullius Cicero (who visited him during his trip to Greece in 79-77BC) and Gaius Julius Caesar both took lessons from him. Perhaps it is credit of Apollonius Molon's work that Cicero and Caesar, Cicero especially, became revered orators in the Roman Republic. He is reputed to have quoted Demosthenes in telling his pupils that the first three elements in rhetoric were "Delivery, Delivery and Delivery." He had a stellar reputation in Roman Law courts, and was even invited to address the Roman Senate in Greek - an honor not usually bestowed upon foreign ambassadors. He endeavored to moderate the florid Asiatic style and cultivated an "Atticizing" tendency. He wrote on Homer, and, according to Josephus, violently attacked the Jews.

References


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

APOLLONIUS MOLON (sometimes called simply MoLON), a Greek rhetorician, who flourished about 70 B.C. He was a native of Alabanda, a pupil of Menecles, and settled at Rhodes. He twice visited Rome as an ambassador from Rhodes, and Cicero and Caesar took lessons from him. He endeavoured. to moderate the florid Asiatic style and cultivated an "Atticiz ing" tendency. He wrote on Homer, and, according to Josephus, violently attacked the Jews.

See C. Muller, Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum, iii.; E. Scharer, History of the Jewish People, iii. (Eng. tr. 1886).


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