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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cesare Orsenigo, nuncio to Germany during World War II, with Hitler and Joachim von Ribbentrop.

The Apostolic Nunciature to Germany is an ecclesiastical office of the Roman Catholic Church in Germany. It is a diplomatic post of the Holy See, whose representative is called the Apostolic Nuncio to Germany with the rank of an ambassador. The office of the nunciature has been located in Berlin since 1920; prior to this, the nunciature was in Munich, accredited to the Kingdom of Bavaria.

Three Popes once served as Germany's nuncio, Alexander VII, Leo XII and Pius XII. The current Apostolic Nuncio to Germany is His Excellency Jean-Claude Périsset, who was appointed by Pope Benedict XVI on October 15, 2007.

Contents

List of Apostolic Nuncios to Germany

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To the Holy Roman Empire

Lorenzo Campeggio, the first nuncio in the territory of modern-day Germany

The first nuncio in the territory of modern-day Germany was Lorenzo Campeggio in 1511, as the nuncio and cardinal protector to the Imperial Court.[1] His role was ratified in 1513 by Leo X, the new pope.[1] The nunciature became permanently accredited in 1530, whereafter the nuncios often followed Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor even when he left Imperial territory.[1]

In Cologne

The Cologne nunciature was erected in 1584 for northwestern Germany and the Rhine.[1] In 1596, the Netherlands was detached from the nunciature of Cologne, receiving its own nuncio in Brussels.[1]

  • Cesare Speciano (1592 - 1598)
  • Attilio Amalteo (1606 - 1610)
  • Pier Luigi Carafa (1624 - 1634)
  • Ciriaco Rocci (1630 - 1634)
  • Fabio Chigi, future Pope Alexander VII (1639 - 1651)
  • Francesco Buonvisi (1670 - 1672)
  • Opizio Pallavicini (1672 - 1680)
  • Sebastiano Tanara (1687 - 1690)
  • Gianantonio Davia (1690 - 1696)
  • Fabrizio Paolucci (1696 - 1700)
  • Giulio Piazza (1702 - 1706)
  • Giovanni Caprara Montecuccoli (1766 - 1775)
  • Carlo Bellisomi (1775 - 1785)
  • Bartolomeo Pacca (1786 -1794)
  • Annibale della Genga, last nuncio to Cologne and future Pope Leo XII (1794 - 1804)
Became the Apostolic Nunciature to Austria

In Munich

Eugenio Pacelli (future Pope Pius XII), the last nuncio in Munich and the first in Berlin

A new nunciature was established by Pius VI in Munich in 1785, requested by Charles Theodore, Elector of Bavaria.[1] The appointment of Giulio Cesare Zoglio as nuncio angered the archbishop electors of Cologne, Mainz, and Trier.[1] Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor sided with the electors, and declared he would recognize nuncios in their "political character" only.[1] Thus, there were two nuncios: one in Cologne, and one in Munich, the division of whose jurisdictions was a matter of contention.[1] The dispute ended only with the political dissolution of Holy Roman Empire, whereafter the Imperial German nunciature became the Austrian nunciature as Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor assumed the title Emperor of Austria.[1] della Genga (future Pope Leo XII) became the last nuncio in Cologne, whereafter Munich became the only nunciature in Germany.[1]

  • Giulio Cesare Zoglio (1785-1794)
  • Internuncio Annibale Della Genga, future Pope Leo XII (1795-1796)
  • Emidio Ziucci (1796-1800)
Vacant from 1800 to 1818.

In Berlin

Aloisius Joseph Muench, nuncio to post-war Germany

Pacelli was moved from Munich to Berlin in 1925 and named "Nuncio to Germany" in 1930, but a separate nuncio in Munich was appointed for a time.

Initially vacant in Allied-occupied Germany: Muench served as apostolic visitor from 1946 before becoming nuncio.

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Wikisource-logo.svg "Nuncio" in the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia.

External links

Coordinates: 52°30′41″N 13°24′47″E / 52.511297°N 13.413027°E / 52.511297; 13.413027


The Apostolic Nunciature to Germany is an ecclesiastical office of the Roman Catholic Church in Germany. It is a diplomatic post of the Holy See, whose representative is called the Apostolic Nuncio to Germany with the rank of an ambassador. The office of the nunciature is located in Berlin.

Three Popes once served as Germany's nuncio, Alexander VII, Leo XII and Pius XII. The current Apostolic Nuncio to Germany is His Excellency Jean-Claude Périsset, who was appointed by Pope Benedict XVI on October 15, 2007.

List of Apostolic Nuncios to Germany

[[File:|thumb|right|Eugenio Pacelli, nuncio to Germany, and future Pope Pius XII]]

  • Cesare Speciano (1592 - 1598)
  • Attilio Amalteo (1606 - 1610)
  • Pier Luigi Carafa (1624 - 1634)
  • Ciriaco Rocci (1630 - 1634)
  • Fabio Chigi (1639 - 1651)
  • Francesco Buonvisi (1670 - 1672)
  • Opizio Pallavicini (1672 - 1680)
  • Sebastiano Tanara (1687 - 1690)
  • Gianantonio Davia (1690 - 1696)
  • Fabrizio Paolucci (1696 - 1700)
  • Giulio Piazza (1702 - 1706)
  • Giovanni Caprara Montecuccoli (1766 - 1775)
  • Carlo Bellisomi (1775 - 1785)
  • Bartolomeo Pacca (1786 -1794)
  • Annibale della Genga (1794 - 1804)
  • Francesco Serra Casano (1818 - 1826)
  • Michele Viale-Prelà (1841 - 1845)
  • Carlo Morichini (1845 - 1847)
  • Carlo Sacconi (1851 - 1853)
  • Antonio De Luca (1853 - 1856)
  • Flavio Chigi (1857 - 1861)
  • Matteo Eustachio Gonella (1861 - 1866)
  • Pier Meglia (1866 - 1874)
  • Angelo Bianchi (1874 - 1877)
  • Gaetano Aloisi Masella (1877 - 1879)
  • Cesare Roncetti (1879 - 1881)
  • Angelo Di Pietro (1882 - 1887)
  • Fulco Luigi Ruffo-Scilla (1887 - 1889)
  • Antonio Agliardi (1889 - 1893)
  • Andrea Aiuti (1893 - 1896)
  • Benedetto Lorenzelli (1896-1899)
  • Cesare Sambucetti (1900 - 1904)
  • Carlo Caputo (1904 - 1907)
  • Andreas Frühwirth, OP (1907 - 1916)
  • Giuseppe Aversa (1916 - 1917)
  • Eugenio Pacelli (1917 - 1930)
  • Alberto Vassallo-Torregrossa (1925 - 1934)
  • Cesare Orsenigo (1930 - 1945)
  • Aloysius Muench (1951 - 1959)
  • Corrado Bafile (1960 - 1975)
  • Guido Del Mestri (1975 - 1984)
  • Giuseppe Uhac (1984 - 1991)
  • Lajos Kada (1991 - 1995)
  • Giovanni Lajolo (1995 - 2003)
  • Erwin Ender (2003 - 2007)
  • Jean-Claude Périsset (2007 - present)

See also


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