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Appomattox Court House

Current "new" Appomattox Court House that was built in 1892
Building
Location Appomattox, Virginia
Coordinates 37°21′32″N 78°49′35″W / 37.35889°N 78.82639°W / 37.35889; -78.82639Coordinates: 37°21′32″N 78°49′35″W / 37.35889°N 78.82639°W / 37.35889; -78.82639
Construction
Started 1892
Completed 1892
Appomattox Court House
new and old marker

The Appomattox Court House is a courthouse in Appomattox, Virginia built in 1892. It is located in the middle of the state about three miles (5 km) northwest of the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, once known as Clover Hill - home of the original Old Appomattox Court House. The "new" Appomattox Court House is near the Appomattox Station and where the regional county government is located.

Before the Civil War, the railroad bypassed Clover Hill, now known as the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park.[1] As a result the population of Clover Hill, where the Old Appomattox Court House once stood, never grew much over while 150 Appomattox town grew to the thousands. When the courthouse at the village of Clover Hill burned for the second time in 1892 t was not rebuilt and a new courthouse was built in West Appomattox. That sealed the fate of the village of Clover Hill. The county seat was formally moved to the town of West Appomattox in 1894 and the word "West" was dropped in time making the name of the town just Appomattox, Virginia.[2]

There is a marker at the site of the "new" Appomattox Court House explaining the difference between the "new" and "old" court houses.[3]

This building, erected in 1892 when the county seat was moved to this location, should not be mistaken for the original, built in 1846 and destroyed by fire in 1892. Three miles northeast is old Appomattox Court House and the McLean House where Lee surrendered to Grant on April 9, 1865, thus ending the War Between the States. The village of Old Appomattox Court House is now preserved as a national shrine by the Federal Government.

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

APPOMATTOX COURT HOUSE, a village of Appomattox county, Virginia, U.S.A., 25 m. E. of Lynchburg, in the S. part of the state. It is served by the Norfolk & Western railway. The village was the scene of the surrender of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee to the Federal forces under Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant on Sunday the 9th of April 1865. The terms were: "the efficers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the government of the United States until properly exchanged, and each company or regimental commander to sign a like parole for the men of their commands,". .. neither "side arms of the officers nor their private horses or baggage" to be surrendered; and, as many privates in the Confederate Army owned horses and mules, all horses and mules claimed by men in the Confederate Army to be left in their possession.


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Simple English

Appomattox Court House is a place in Virginia (It is now called Appomattox, Virginia). It is where General Robert E. Lee of the Confederate Army surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant and the Union Army on April 9, 1865, ending the American Civil War. Though the place is called Appomattox Court House, the surrender took place at the McLean House, a private home.


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