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Aquia Church
U.S. National Register of Historic Places
U.S. National Historic Landmark
Aquia Church
Nearest city: Garrisonville, Virginia
Area: 8.5 acres[1]
Built/Founded: 1751-1755
(Interior rebuilt, 1757)
Architect: Mourning Richards; William Copein
Architectural style(s): Georgian
Governing body: Private
Added to NRHP: November 12, 1969[2]
Designated NHL: July 5, 1991[3]
NRHP Reference#: 69000282

Aquia Church (1751-1755), in Stafford, Virginia, USA, is an Episcopal church that has been designated a National Historic Landmark since 1991.[1][3] It maintains an active congregation with a variety of programs and outreach to the community.[4]

Established by the then-state Church of England, the church building was designed on a relatively unique "Greek Cross plan", less common for colonial churches.[1]. It was built on the site of two earlier Anglican churches of Overwharton Parish, formed before 1680 by the division of Potomac Parish. It is located at the intersection of US 1 and VA 610 in Stafford.

It is said to be one of the most haunted churches in Virginia.[citation needed]

References

  1. ^ a b c Sarah S. Driggs, John S. Salmon, Calder C. Loth, and Carolyn Pitts (August 27, 1990), National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: Aquia ChurchPDF (32 KB), National Park Service  and Accompanying 8 photos, exterior and interior, from 1990PDF (32 KB)
  2. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2007-01-23. http://www.nr.nps.gov/. 
  3. ^ a b "Aquia Church". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. http://tps.cr.nps.gov/nhl/detail.cfm?ResourceId=857&ResourceType=Building. Retrieved 2008-02-18. 
  4. ^ Aquia Episcopal Church, accessed 16 Mar 2010

External links

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