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Ar 96
Arado Ar 96 in flight
Role Military Trainer
Manufacturer Arado Flugzeugwerke
First flight 1938
Introduced 1939
Primary users Luftwaffe
Czechoslovakian Air Force
Hungarian Air Force
Romanian Air Force
Number built ~ 3,500

Arado Ar 96 was a German single-engine, low-wing monoplane of all-metal construction produced by Arado Flugzeugwerke. It was the Luftwaffe's standard advanced trainer during World War II.

Contents

Design and development

Designed by Walter Blume as the result of a 1936 Reich Air Ministry tender, the prototype, powered by a 179 kW (240 hp) Argus As 10c engine, first flew in 1938. In 1939, an initial batch of Ar 96A aircraft was produced. This was followed by the major production series, the more powerful Ar 96B, fitted with the Argus As 410 engine.

Operational history

The Ar 96 was used for advanced, night and instrument flying training.

Shadow production was undertaken by Letov and the Avia factory in occupied Czechoslovakia, where manufacturing continued for some years after the war, being designated C-2. A wooden version known as the Ar 396 was built in France and was designated SIPA SS.11. Further developments were the SIPA 111 (armed version), and SIPA S-12, a metal version. 58 Machines were produced until 1958. The S.11 was operated with some success in Algeria carrying machine guns, rockets and light bombs.

Variants

Ar 96A
Two-seat advanced trainer aircraft. Initial production version.
Ar 96B
Improved version. Main production version.
C.2B
Czech production version of the Ar 96B. Czech designation C.2B. 228 built by Avia and 182 by Letov between 1945 and 1950.[1]
Ar 96B-1
Unarmed pilot trainer version.
Ar 96B-2
Ar 96C
Ar 396
Ar 396A-1
Single-seat gunnery trainer version.
Ar 396A-2
Unarmed instrument trainer version.
SIPA S.10
French production version of Ar 396, 28 produced.[2]
SIPA S.11
Modified version of S.10,powered by Renault 12S (French built Argus As 411), 50 built for the French Air Force.[2]
SIPA S.12
All metal version of S.11, 52 built for the French Air Force.[2]
SIPA S.121
Modified version of S.12, 58 built for the French Air Force.[2]

Production figures up to 1945

Version Arado AGO Avia Letov Total Construction Period
Prototypes 4       4 1937 - 1938
A-0 6       6 including 3 delivered on 1 April 1939, W.-Nr. 2879-2884
A 23 69     92 Mid 1939 - May 1940
B-0 2       2 1940
B-1 144 223 997 17 1,381 July 1940 - April 1944
B-3     210   210 1941 - 1943
B-6     100   100 July 1943 - January 1944
B-7     518 378 896 May 1944 - March 1945
B-7/B-8 81 81 December 1944 - March 1945
B-8 74 74 June 1944 - January 1945
Sales series 45       45 1939 - 1940
TOTALS 224 292 1825 550 2891

Operators

 Bulgaria
  • Bulgaria received two Avia C.2s in 1948.[3]
 Czechoslovakia
 Germany
 Hungary
 Romania
 Slovakia

Survivors

Specifications (Arado Ar 96B-2)

Data from [5]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 9.10 m (29 ft 10¼ in)
  • Wingspan: 11.00 m (36 ft 1 in)
  • Height: 2.60 m (8 ft 6¼ in)
  • Wing area: 17.10 m² (184.07 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 1,295 kg (2,854 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 1,700 kg (3,748 lb)
  • Powerplant:Argus As 410A-1 12-cylinder inverted-Vee piston engine, 347 kW (465 hp)

Performance

Armament

See also

Comparable aircraft

Related lists

References

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Notes

  1. ^ Kudlicka 2004, pp. 45—46.
  2. ^ a b c d Taylor, Michael J H. Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. pg. 825. Portland House, 1989. ISBN 0-517-69186-8
  3. ^ Kudlicka 2004, p.48.
  4. ^ Flyhistorisk Museum Sola (Norwegian)
  5. ^ Mondey, David. Axis Aircraft of World War II.  

Bibliography

  • Green, William. Warplanes of the Third Reich. London: Macdonald and Jane's Publishers Ltd., 1970 (fourth impression 1979). ISBN 0-356-02382-6.
  • Kranzhoff, Jörg Armin. Arado Ar 96 Varianten (Flugzeug Profile Nr. 43) (in German). Stengelheim, Germany: Unitec-Medienvertrieb, e.K., 2006.
  • Kudlicka, Bohumir. "An Arado By Other Names". Air Enthusiast, No. 111, May/June 2004. Stamford, UK:Key Publishing. pp. 45—49.
  • Mondey, David. The Concise Guide to Axis Aircraft of World War II. London: Chancellor, 1996. ISBN 1 85152 966 7.
  • Smith J. R. and Kay, Anthony. German Aircraft of the Second World War. London: Putnam & Company Ltd., 1972. ISBN 0-370-00024-2.

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