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The Arc de Triomphe at night

The Arc de Triomphe is a monument in Paris that stands in the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle, also known as the Place de l'Étoile.[1] Officially, it is the Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile, as a smaller Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel exists nearby. It is located at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. The triumphal arch honours those who fought for France, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars. On the inside and the top of the arc there are all of the names of generals and wars fought. Underneath is the tomb of the unknown soldier from World War I. (Axe historique) — a sequence of monuments and grand thoroughfares on a route which goes from the courtyard of the Louvre Palace to the outskirts of Paris. The monument was designed by Jean Chalgrin in 1806, and its iconographic program pitted heroically nude French youths against bearded Germanic warriors in chain mail. It set the tone for public monuments, with triumphant nationalistic messages, until World War I.

The monument stands 50 m (160 ft) in height, 45 m (148 ft) wide and 22 m (72 ft) deep. The large vault is -29.19 m (−95.8 ft) high and 14.62 m (48.0 ft) wide. The small vault is 18.68 m (61.3 ft) high and 8.44 m (27.7 ft) wide. It is the second largest triumphal arch in existence.[2] Its design was inspired by the Roman Arch of Titus. The Arc de Triomphe is so colossal that three weeks after the Paris victory parade in 1919, marking the end of hostilities in World War I, Charles Godefroy flew his Nieuport biplane through it, with the event captured on newsreel.[3][4][5]

Contents

History

There was a pre-Napoleonic (1758) proposal by Charles Ribart for an elephant-shaped building on the location of the current arch.

The Arc de Triomphe is one of the most famous monuments in Paris. It forms the backdrop for an impressive urban ensemble in Paris. The monument surmounts the hill of Chaillot at the center of a star-shaped configuration of radiating avenues. It was commissioned in 1806 after the victory at Austerlitz by Emperor Napoleon at the peak of his fortunes. Laying the foundations alone took two years, and in 1810 when Napoleon entered Paris from the west with his bride Archduchess Marie-Louise of Austria, he had a wooden mock-up of the completed arch constructed. The architect Jean Chalgrin died in 1811, and the work was taken over by Jean-Nicolas Huyot. During the Bourbon Restoration, construction was halted and it would not be completed until the reign of King Louis-Philippe, in 1833–36 when the architects on site were Goust, then Huyot, under the direction of Héricart de Thury. Napoleon's body passed under it on 15 December 1840 on its way to its second and final resting place at the Invalides.[6]

The design

The Arc de Triomphe from the Place Charles de Gaulle

Since the fall of Napoleon (1815), the sculpture representing Peace is interpreted as commemorating the Peace of 1815. The astylar design is by Jean Chalgrin (1739–1811), in the Neoclassical version of ancient Roman architecture (see, for example, the triumphal Arch of Titus). Major academic sculptors of France are represented in the sculpture of the Arc de Triomphe: Jean-Pierre Cortot; François Rude; Antoine Étex; James Pradier and Philippe Joseph Henri Lemaire. The main sculptures are not integral friezes but are treated as independent trophies applied to the vast ashlar masonry masses, not unlike the gilt-bronze appliqués on Empire furniture. The four sculptural groups at the base of the Arc are The Triumph of 1810 (Cortot), Resistance and Peace (both by Antoine Étex) and the most renowned of them all, Departure of the Volunteers of 1792 commonly called La Marseillaise (François Rude). The face of the allegorical representation of France calling forth her people on this last was used as the belt buckle for the seven-star rank of Marshal of France.

In the attic above the richly sculptured frieze of soldiers are 30 shields engraved with the names of major Revolutionary and Napoleonic military victories. (The Battle of Fuentes de Onoro is described as a French victory, instead of the tactical draw). The inside walls of the monument list the names of 660 persons, among which 558 French generals of the First French Empire;[7] the names of those who died in battle are underlined. Also inscribed, on the shorter sides of the four supporting columns, are the names of the major victorious battles of the Napoleonic Wars. The battles which took place in the period between the departure of Napoleon from Elba and his final defeat at Waterloo are not included.

The sword carried by the Republic in the Marseillaise relief broke off on the day, it is said, that the Battle of Verdun began in 1916. The relief was immediately hidden by tarpaulins to conceal the accident and avoid any undesired ominous interpretations. Famous victory marches past or under the Arc have included the Germans in 1871, the French in 1918, the Germans in 1940,[8] and the French and Allies in 1944[9] and 1945. A United States postage stamp from 1945 shows the Arc in the background as victorious American troops march down the Champs-Élysées and U.S. airplanes fly overhead. In 2002 Jacques Chirac survived an assassination attempt at the Arc de Triomphe.[10]

The Unknown Soldier

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier beneath the Arc de Triomphe, Paris

Beneath the Arc is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from the First World War. Interred here on Armistice Day 1920, it has the first eternal flame lit in Western and Eastern Europe since the Vestal Virgins' fire was extinguished in the year 394. It burns in memory of the dead who were never identified (now in both World Wars). The French model inspired the United Kingdom's tomb of The Unknown Warrior in Westminster Abbey. A ceremony is held there every 11 November on the anniversary of the armistice signed between France and Germany in 1918. It was originally decided on 12 November 1919 to bury the unknown soldier's remains in the Panthéon, but a public letter-writing campaign led to the decision to bury him beneath the Arc de Triomphe. The coffin was put in the chapel on the first floor of the Arc on 10 November 1920, and put in its final resting place on 28 January 1921. The slab on top carries the inscription ICI REPOSE UN SOLDAT FRANÇAIS MORT POUR LA PATRIE 1914–1918 ("Here lies a French soldier who died for the fatherland 1914–1918").

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy of the United States paid their respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, accompanied by French President de Gaulle. After the 1963 assassination of President Kennedy, Mrs. Kennedy remembered the eternal flame at the Arc de Triomphe and requested that an eternal flame be placed next to her husband's grave at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. President de Gaulle went to Washington to attend the state funeral, and he was able to witness Jacqueline Kennedy lighting the eternal flame that was inspired by her visit to France.

By the early 1960s, the monument had grown very blackened from coal soot and automobile exhaust, and during 1965–1966, it was thoroughly cleaned through bleaching. By 2007, some darkening was again apparent. The arc is planned to be bleached again in 2011.[citation needed]

Access

Pedestrian access to the Arc de Triomphe is via an underpass The Arc has one lift (elevator), to the level underneath the exterior observation level. Visitors can either climb 284 steps to reach the top of the Arc or take the lift and walk up 46 steps.[11] From the top there is a panoramic view of Paris, of the twelve major avenues leading to the Place de l'Étoile and of the exceptionally busy roundabout in which the Arc stands. The Arc de Triomphe is accessible by the RER and Métro at the Charles de Gaulle—Etoile stop.

See also

References

  1. ^ The "Star" is formed by the radiating avenues.
  2. ^ North Korea built a slightly larger Arch of Triumph in 1982 for the 70th birthday of Kim Il-Sung.
  3. ^ Melville Wallace, La vie d'un pilote de chasse en 1914–1918, 1978. The film clip is included in The History Channel's Four Years of Thunder.
  4. ^ Film of the first flight through the Arc de Triomphe
  5. ^ Photograph of the first flight through the Arc
  6. ^ Hôtel des Invalides website
  7. ^ Among the generals are at least two foreign generals, Francisco de Miranda and Nicolas Luckner.
  8. ^ Image of Nazi parade
  9. ^ Image of Liberation of Paris parade
  10. ^ The Quick 10: The Arc de Triomphe
  11. ^ The elevator is mainly reserved for the handicapped or those unable to walk the stairs.

External links

Coordinates: 48°52′26″N 2°17′42″E / 48.8738°N 2.2950°E / 48.8738; 2.2950


File:Arc
The Arc de Triomphe at night

The Arc de Triomphe, (Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile), is a monument in Paris that stands in the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle, (originally named Place de l'Étoile), at the western end of the Champs-Élysées.[1] There is a smaller arch, the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, which stands west of the Louvre. The Arc de Triomphe, (in English: Triumphal Arch)[2], honours those who fought and died for France in the French Revolutionary and the Napoleonic Wars, with the names of all French victories and generals inscribed on its inner and outer surfaces. Underneath its vault lies the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I.

The Arc de Triomphe is the linchpin of the historic axis (Axe historique) — a sequence of monuments and grand thoroughfares on a route which goes from the courtyard of the Louvre, to the Grande Arche de la Défense. The monument was designed by Jean Chalgrin in 1806, and its iconographic program pitted heroically nude French youths against bearded Germanic warriors in chain mail. It set the tone for public monuments, with triumphant patriotic messages, until World War I.

The monument stands 50 m (160 ft) in height, 45 m (148 ft) wide and 22 m (72 ft) deep. The large vault is 29.19 m (95.8 ft) high and 14.62 m (48.0 ft) wide. The small vault is 18.68 m (61.3 ft) high and 8.44 m (27.7 ft) wide. It is the second largest triumphal arch in existence.[3] Its design was inspired by the Roman Arch of Titus. The Arc de Triomphe is so colossal that three weeks after the Paris victory parade in 1919, marking the end of hostilities in World War I, Charles Godefroy flew his Nieuport biplane through it, with the event captured on newsreel.[4][5][6]

Contents

History

File:Godefroy
Charles Godefroy – The flight through the Arc de Triomphe, on 7 August 1919.
File:Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-126-0347-09A, Paris, Deutsche Truppen am Arc de
German soldiers on parade marching past the Arc de Triomphe after the surrender of Paris, 14 June 1940
File:Crowds of French patriots line the Champs
With the Arc de Triomphe in the background, vehicles of the French 2nd Armored Division roll down the Champs Élysées lined with Parisians, on 26 August 1944, the day following the Liberation of Paris.

It is located on the right bank of the Seine. The monument surmounts the hill of Chaillot at the center of a pentagon-shaped configuration of twelve radiating avenues. It was commissioned in 1806 after the victory at Austerlitz by Emperor Napoleon at the peak of his fortunes. Laying the foundations alone took two years and, in 1810, when Napoleon entered Paris from the west with his bride Archduchess Marie-Louise of Austria, he had a wooden mock-up of the completed arch constructed. Chalgrin, the architect, died in 1811, and the work was taken over by Jean-Nicolas Huyot. During the Bourbon Restoration, construction was halted and it would not be completed until the reign of King Louis-Philippe, between 1833 and 1836, by the architects Goust, then Huyot, under the direction of Héricart de Thury. On 15 December 1840, brought back to France from Saint Helena, Napoleon's remains passed under it on their way to the Emperor's final resting place at the Invalides.[7] Prior to burial in the Panthéon, the body of Victor Hugo was exposed under the Arch during the night of the 22 May 1885.

The sword carried by the Republic in the Marseillaise relief broke off on the day, it is said, that the Battle of Verdun began in 1916. The relief was immediately hidden by tarpaulins to conceal the accident and avoid any undesired ominous interpretations[citation needed]. On 7 August 1919, Charles Godefroy successfully flew his biplane under the Arch [8] . Jean Navarre was the pilot who was tasked to make the flight, but he died on 10 July 1919 when he crashed near Villacoublay while training for the flight.

Following its construction, the Arc de Triomphe became the rallying point of French troops parading after successful military campaigns and for the annual Bastille Day Military Parade. Famous victory marches around or under the Arc have included the Germans in 1871, the French in 1919, the Germans in 1940,[9] and the French and Allies in 1944[10] and 1945. A United States postage stamp from 1945 shows the Arc de Triomphe in the background as victorious American troops march down the Champs-Élysées and U.S. airplanes fly overhead on 29 August 1944.

By the early 1960s, the monument had grown very blackened from coal soot and automobile exhaust, and during 1965–1966, it was cleaned through bleaching.

In the prolongation of the Avenue des Champs-Élysées, a new arch, the Grande Arche de la Défense, was built in 1982, completing the line of monuments that forms Paris' Axe historique. After the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel and the Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile, the Grande Arche is the third arch built on the same perspective.

The design

The astylar design is by Jean Chalgrin (1739–1811), in the Neoclassical version of ancient Roman architecture (see, for example, the triumphal Arch of Titus). Major academic sculptors of France are represented in the sculpture of the Arc de Triomphe: Jean-Pierre Cortot; François Rude; Antoine Étex; James Pradier and Philippe Joseph Henri Lemaire. The main sculptures are not integral friezes but are treated as independent trophies applied to the vast ashlar masonry masses, not unlike the gilt-bronze appliqués on Empire furniture. The four sculptural groups at the base of the Arc are The Triumph of 1810 (Cortot), Resistance and Peace (both by Antoine Étex) and the most renowned of them all, Departure of the Volunteers of 1792 commonly called La Marseillaise (François Rude). The face of the allegorical representation of France calling forth her people on this last was used as the belt buckle for the honorary rank of Marshal of France. Since the fall of Napoleon (1815), the sculpture representing Peace is interpreted as commemorating the Peace of 1815. [[File:|left|thumb|150px|Avenues radiate from the Arc de Triomphe in Place de l'Étoile.]] In the attic above the richly sculptured frieze of soldiers are 30 shields engraved with the names of major Revolutionary and Napoleonic military victories. (The Battle of Fuentes de Onoro is described as a French victory, instead of the tactical draw). The inside walls of the monument list the names of 660 persons, among which 558 French generals of the First French Empire;[11] the names of those who died in battle are underlined. Also inscribed, on the shorter sides of the four supporting columns, are the names of the major victorious battles of the Napoleonic Wars. The battles which took place in the period between the departure of Napoleon from Elba to his final defeat at Waterloo are not included.

There was at the top of the Arc from 1882 to 1886, a monumental sculpture of Alexandre Falguière, "Le triomphe de la Révolution" (the Triumph of the Revolution), a chariot drawn by horses preparing "to crush Anarchy and Despotism", that remained only four years up there before falling in ruins.

Inside the monument opened in Februray 2007, between War and Peace, the new permanent exhibition conceived by the artist Maurice Benayoun and the architect Christophe Girault. The steel and new media installation interrogates the symbolic of the “national monument” questioning the balance of its symbolic message during the last two centuries, oscillating between war and peace.

The Unknown Soldier

File:Unknownsoldier
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier beneath the Arc de Triomphe, Paris

Beneath the Arc is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from the First World War. Interred here on Armistice Day 1920, it has the first eternal flame lit in Western and Eastern Europe since the Vestal Virgins' fire was extinguished in the year 394. It burns in memory of the dead who were never identified (now in both World Wars). The French model inspired the United Kingdom's tomb of The Unknown Warrior in Westminster Abbey. A ceremony is held there every 11 November on the anniversary of the armistice signed between France and Germany in 1918. It was originally decided on 12 November 1919 to bury the unknown soldier's remains in the Panthéon, but a public letter-writing campaign led to the decision to bury him beneath the Arc de Triomphe. The coffin was put in the chapel on the first floor of the Arc on 10 November 1920, and put in its final resting place on 28 January 1921. The slab on top carries the inscription ICI REPOSE UN SOLDAT FRANÇAIS MORT POUR LA PATRIE 1914–1918 ("Here lies a French soldier who died for the fatherland 1914–1918").

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy of the United States paid their respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, accompanied by French President de Gaulle. After the 1963 assassination of President Kennedy, Mrs. Kennedy remembered the eternal flame at the Arc de Triomphe and requested that an eternal flame be placed next to her husband's grave at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. President de Gaulle went to Washington to attend the state funeral, and witness Jacqueline Kennedy lighting the eternal flame that was inspired by her visit to France.

Details

File:Arc De Triomphe
The Arc de Triomphe from the Place Charles de Gaulle
File:Champs-Elysées, vue de la Concorde à l'
The Arc de Triomphe is located on the historical axis of Paris (Axe historique), a large perspective that runs from the Louvre to the Arche de la défense.
  • The four main sculptures of the monument are
  • Les funérailles du général Marceau (General Marceau's burial), by P. H. Lamaire (SOUTH façade, right),
  • La bataille d'Aboukir (The Battle of Aboukir), by Bernard Seurre (SOUTH façade, left),
  • La bataille de Jemappes (The Battle of Jemappes), by Carlo Marochetti (EAST façade),
  • Le passage du pont d'Arcole (The Battle of Arcole), by J. J. Feuchère (NORTH façade, right),
  • La prise d'Alexandrie, (The Fall of Alexandria), by J. E. Chaponnière (NORTH façade, left),
  • La bataille d'Austerlitz (The Battle of Austerlitz), by J. F. T. Gechter (WEST façade),
  • Some great battles of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars are engraved on the attic, including
  • A list of French victories are engraved under the great arches in the inside façades of the monument.
  • The great arcades are decorated by allegorical figures representing characters of the Roman mythology (by J. Pradier).

Access

Pedestrian access to the Arc de Triomphe is via an underpass, visitors are not permitted to cross by road which has a heavy police presence. The Arc has one lift (elevator), to the level underneath the exterior observation level. Visitors can either climb 284 steps to reach the top (or attic) of the Arc which contains information and large models of the Arc and also contains a gift shop. Visitors can also take the lift and walk up 46 steps.[1] From the top there is a panoramic view of Paris, of the twelve major avenues leading to the Place de l'Étoile and of the exceptionally busy roundabout in which the Arc stands. The Arc de Triomphe is accessible by the RER and Métro at the Charles de Gaulle—Etoile stop.

See also

File:Arc Triomphe.jpg Paris portal

References

  1. ^ The elevator is mainly reserved for the handicapped or those unable to walk the stairs.

External links

porbhun.con

Coordinates: 48°52′26″N 2°17′42″E / 48.8738°N 2.2950°E / 48.8738; 2.2950


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Paris/8th arrondissement article)

From Wikitravel

Europe : France : Île-de-France : Paris : 8th arrondissement
Contents
The ceiling of the Arc de Triumph by Nelson Minar
The ceiling of the Arc de Triumph by Nelson Minar

The 8th Arrondissement of Paris is home to the Champs Elysée, which ends up at the Arc de Triomphe. The executive branch of French government is also based here, as well as the embassies of certain nations such as the U.S.

Get in

By Métro

Take Line 1 to George V.

Avenue des Champs-Elysées at night
Avenue des Champs-Elysées at night

For many visitors one of the must-see places in Paris is the Avenue des Champs-Elysées which was first created in 1667 by Louis XIV's gardener, Andre Le Nôtre, in order to improve the view from the Tuileries garden. This elegant and broad avenue was extended towards the end of the 18th century, now running from the place de la Concorde to the Arc de Triomphe. It is noted today as one of the most prestigious shopping boulevards of Paris.

At the east end of the Champs-Elysées is Place de la Concorde, the largest square in Paris with fantastic vistas in every direction. It was in this square (then called la Place de la Revolution) that the French King Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and many others were guillotined during the Terror. The large Egyptian obelisk in the centre of the Place de la Concorde was brought from the Temple of Luxor.

l'Arc de Triomphe
l'Arc de Triomphe
  • l'Arc de Triomphe, place Charles de Gaulle (Métro Charles de Gaulle-Etoile), +33 1 01 11 01 03. This iconic triumphal arch forms the focus of the main east-west road axis of Paris, running between the Louvre and the Grande Arche de la Défense in the west. The monument was commissioned by Napoleon in 1806 as a tribute to his victories as Emperor of France - it was finally completed in 1836, long after his death. 50 m (150 ft) high and 45 m wide, the Arc de Triomphe is decorated with battle scenes and martial sculptures that includes La Marseillaise by Rude. More recently, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was placed beneath the arch in 1920, where an eternal flame burns in tribute to the French dead of both World Wars. The arch is surrounded by a large roundabout, aptly known as l'Etoile - 'the star' - with 12 thoroughfares leading off from it. Visitors can purchase a ticket to climb to the top of the arch, from where magnificent views spread out over western Paris. Admission to a small museum devoted to the history and meaning of the monument is included. The central island and the arch are accessed by an underground passage. Do not attempt to negotiate by foot the busy multi-lane road that rings the Arc de Triomphe, which many Parisian drivers seem to consider their own personal speedway. admission fee applies for over-18s.  edit
la Madeleine, front facade
la Madeleine, front facade
  • Église de la Madeleine (La Madeleine), place de la Madeleine (Métro: Madeleine). Open 7AM - 7PM Mon-Sat, 8AM - 1.30PM and 3.30PM - 7PM Sun. One of the best-known and most beautiful churches in Paris, in the guise of a Corinthian order Classical temple. Construction started in 1764, although the church was not finally consecrated until 1845. The Madeleine has a lavish interior of marble and gold.  edit
  • Musée Jacquemart-André (Jacquemart-Andre Museum), [1]. Private collection of French, Italian, Dutch masterpieces in a typical XIXth century mansion.  edit
  • Musée du Petit Palais.  edit
  • Musée Cernuschi, 7 Avenue Vélasquez (Métro : Monceau, Villiers), +33 1 45 63 50 75, [2]. closed Mo and public holidays, open daily 10AM - 5.40PM.  edit
  • Jerome de Noirmont, 38, avenue Matignon, +33 1 42 89 89 00. This museum represents some key contemporary and emering artists such as Jean Pierre Raynaud, Eva and Adele and Jeff Koons.  edit
  • Le Grand Palais (Galeries nationales du Grand Palais), [3]. An impressive museum wtih a classic interior.  edit
  • Restaurant Indien Qasim, 22 rue du Colisée (Métro: Franklin D. Roosevelt), +33 1 45 62 19 73. Typical Pakistani & Indian Dishes  edit
  • Diep, 55 rue Pierre-Charron (Métro Franklin D. Roosevelt), +33 1 45 63 52 76. Thai, Chinese, and Indonesian. Vegetarian friendly.  edit
  • Café Jacquemart-André.  edit
  • Korova, 33, rue Marbeuf, +33 1 53 89 93 93. The brainchild of celebrity chef Jean-Luc Delarue, Korova is the 'in' spot to dine in Paris. Designed by industry expert Christian Biecher, and with Frederick Herme in the kitchen, dining here is well worth the extravagance.  edit
  • Kokohana (Teppanyaki), 1, Rue Jean Mermoz, 08 26 10 01 99. Two chefs battle against each other in a spectacular performance of chopping, slicing, sautein everything from scallops to foie gras. The food is average, but the presentation is well worth it! menus from €14.50—38.  edit
  • La Table du Lancaster, 7, Rue de Berri, 01 40 76 40 18, [4]. Directed under chef Michel Troisgros, the kitchen prepares food in five themes: tomatoes, citrus, spices, greens, and dairy). This hotel restaurant was once home to screen goddess, Marlene Dietrich. Lunch is up to €50 per person.  edit
  • Spoon, 14, rue Marignan (Métro - Franklin Roosevelt), 33 (0) 1 40 76 34 44 (), [5]. M-F 12:15PM-2:30PM, 7:30PM-10:30PM. Chef Alain Ducasse's à la mode eatery with modern appeal. The carte allows you to choose a main dish, the condiment, and an accompanying dish for a personalized menu with a high end feel.  edit
  • Ladurée, 75, avenue des Champs-Elysées, +33.1.40.75.08.75, [6]. Famous for their macaron cookies, which come in over 15 different flavors. Expensive, but an experience. There is a tea room, a bar, and a restaurant. You can also order baked goods to go, in fancy boxes and bags.  edit
  • Hanawa, 26, rue Bayard, +33.1.56.62.70.70. Great sushi in a nice atmosphere, extensive menu, but expensive. expensive.  edit
  • Chez Francis, 7, place de l'Alma (Métro - Montagne). It's a wee bit pricey but has a beautiful view of the Eiffel Tower and serves the most delicious Croques Monsieur and Madame for €12.  edit
  • Buddha Bar, 8 Rue Boissy d' Anglais (Métro: Concorde), +33 1 53 05 90 00 (fax: +33 1 53 05 90 09), [7]. The Buddha Bar is famous in electronic lounge music circles for having commissioned a series of lounge and downtempo records which you can get at most larger record shops in France, as well as many abroad. Although you can also get them at the bar it's probably not the best way, since they charge €45 per CD. The drinks are not so over-priced, and definitely worth it for the hip, sophisticated, and chill atmosphere.  edit
map of the 8th Arrondissement
map of the 8th Arrondissement
  • Hotel Plaza Elysees, 177 Boulevard Haussmann, + 33 (0)1 45 63 93 83, [8]. Ideally situated in the area of Champs Elysées and Faubourg Saint-Honoré, very close to the Arc-de-Triomphe.Direct link to Disneyland® Resort Paris, La Defense. Lido Cabaret and the famous Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré with Haute Couture Shops and Antiques Furniture Shops.  edit
  • Champs Elysées Plaza, 35, rue de Berri - 75008 - Paris, +33 1 53 53 20 20 (, fax: +33 1 53 53 20 21), [9]. Unusually large rooms and suites. Elegant and sophisticated, with high tech equipment and comfort, they offer a unique mix of contemporary chic décor with ceiling moldings, marble fireplaces and large windows looking at two beautiful and quiet streets.  edit
  • Hôtel de Crillon, 10 Place de la Concorde (northern side), Champs-Élysées, +33 1 44 71 15 01 (fax: +33 1 44 71 15 03), [10]. Without doubt, one of the most prestigious, palatial and expensive hotels in Paris (if you have to ask how much, you can't afford to stay here. Superior doubles start at €530.... prices rise steeply thereafter, especially for the suites).  edit
  • Hotel Sofitel Le Faubourg-Paris, 15, rue Boissy d'Anglas, +33 1 44 94 14 14 (fax: +33 1 44 94 14 28), [11]. 154 rooms and 20 suites spread over two buildings dating from the 18th and 19th centuries.  edit
  • Four Seasons Hotel George V, 31, avenue George V, +33 1 49 52 70 00 (fax: +33 1 49 52 70 100), [12]. Steps from the Champs-Elysées, with private terraces that command all Paris; 17th-century tapestries, lovingly restored; and a spirit that lives on in thoroughly reborn, highly advanced spaces, Four Seasons George V Paris redefines luxury service in the City of Light.  edit
  • Hyatt Regency Paris - Madeleine, 24 Boulevard Malesherbes, +33 1 55 27 12 34 (), [14]. Boutique hotel size with personalized service. Has 2 good restaurants.  edit
  • Hôtel Balzac, 6, rue de Balzac, 866 914 8916. This elegantly furnished hotel exudes opulence from its fine classic interior to the personalied butler service on offer.  edit
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Simple English

File:Arc de triophme
The Arc de Triomphe in Paris

The Arc de Triomphe, in the end of the Champs-Elysées, is a very famous monument in Paris.

It was commissioned in 1806 after the victory at Austerlitz by Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte. It is a large arc, and even though it may be thought by some people that you can drive underneath it, you cannot. It was designed by Jean-Francois Chalgrin and has roughly 300 steps!








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