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Archduke Leopold Ferdinand, Prince of Tuscany: Wikis

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Archduke Leopold Ferdinand
Spouse Wilhelmine Abramovic
Maria Ritter
Clara Groger
Full name
Leopold Ferdinand Salvator Marie Joseph Johann Baptist Zenobius Rupprecht Ludwig Karl Jacob Vivian
Father Ferdinand IV, Grand Duke of Tuscany
Mother Alice of Bourbon-Parma
Born 2 December 1868(1868-12-02)
Salzburg
Died 4 July 1935 (aged 66)
Berlin

Archduke Leopold Ferdinand of Austria (2 December 1868 – 4 July 1935) was the eldest son of Ferdinand IV, Grand Duke of Tuscany, and Alice of Bourbon-Parma.

Contents

Early life

In 1892 and 1893 Leopold accompanied Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria on a sea voyage through the Suez Canal and on to India and Australia. Leopold and Franz Ferdinand quarreled and Leopold left the trip at Sydney and returned to Austria.[1] He was dismissed from the Austro-Hungarian Navy and entered an infantry regiment at Brno. Eventually he was appointed colonel of the 81st Regiment FZM Baron von Waldstätten.[2]

Leopold fell in love with a prostitute and suffered from alcoholism. After he had been treated in the Rhineland his parents offered him 100,000 florins on condition that he leave his mistress.

Renunciation of title

On 29 December 1902 it was announced that the Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria had agreed to a request by Leopold to renounce his rank as an archduke.[3] His name was removed from the roll of the Order of the Golden Fleece and from the army list. He took the name Leopold Wölfling after a peak in the Ore Mountains. He was forbidden from entering Austrian lands and became a Swiss citizen. He was given a gift of 200,000 florins as well as a further 30,000 florins as income from his parents.

After World War I Wölfling's allowance from his family stopped. He returned to Austria and opened a delicatessen store in Vienna where he sold salami and olive oil.[4]

In 1924 Wölfling published a biography in Czech, Poslední Habsburkové: vzpomínky a úvahy (Last of the Habsburgs: Memories and Thoughts). In 1930 an English edition appeared with the title My Life Story: From Archduke to Grocer published in London by Hutchinson & Co. An American edition appeared in 1931 published in New York by Dutton. A German language edition appeared in 1935 published in Austria by Selle-Eysler.

Wölfling married three times:

  • Wilhelmine Abramovic (1877-1908)
  • Maria Ritter (1877-1938)
  • Clara Groger (1910-1941)

Wölfling died at Berlin.[5] His grave is preserved in the Protestant Friedhof III der Jerusalems- und Neuen Kirchengemeinde (Cemetery No. III of the congregations of Jerusalem's Church and New Church) in Berlin-Kreuzberg, south of Hallesches Tor.[6]

Titles ans styles

  • 2 December 1868  – 29 December 1902: His Imperial and Royal Highness Archduke Leopold Ferdinand of Austria, Prince Imperial of Austria, Prince Royal of Hungary and Bohemia, Prince of Tuscany
  • 29 December 1902  – 4 July 1935: Leopold Wölfling

Ancestry

References

  1. ^ Nicholas Horthy, Memoirs ( London: Hutchinson, 1956), 70-71.
  2. ^ Almanach de Gotha, 1902 (Gotha: Justus Perthes, 1902), 10.
  3. ^ Wiener Zeitung ( 29 December 1902), page 1.
  4. ^ "Unser Anton", Time Magazine ( 9 December 1929).
  5. ^ "Ex-Archduke's Death In Poverty", The Times ( 5 July 1935): 13.
  6. ^ Royalty Travel Guide, Berlin, Kirchhof vor dem Halleschen Tor
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Archduke Leopold Ferdinand
Spouse Wilhelmine Abramovic
Maria Ritter
Clara Groger
Full name
Leopold Ferdinand Salvator Marie Joseph Johann Baptist Zenobius Rupprecht Ludwig Karl Jacob Vivian
Father Ferdinand IV, Grand Duke of Tuscany
Mother Alice of Bourbon-Parma
Born December 2, 1868(1868-12-02)
Salzburg
Died July 4, 1935 (aged 66)
Berlin

Archduke Leopold Ferdinand of Austria, Prince of Tuscany (2 December 1868-4 July 1935) was the eldest son of Ferdinand IV, Grand Duke of Tuscany and Alice of Bourbon-Parma.

Contents

Early life

In 1892 and 1893 Leopold accompanied Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria on a sea voyage through the Suez Canal and on to India and Australia. Leopold and Franz Ferdinand quarreled and Leopold left the trip at Sydney and returned to Austria.[1] He was dismissed from the Austro-Hungarian Navy and entered an infantry regiment at Brno. Eventually he was appointed colonel of the 81st Regiment FZM Baron von Waldstätten.[2]

Leopold fell in love with a prostitute and suffered from alcoholism. After he had been treated in the Rhineland his parents offered him 100,000 florins on condition that he leave his mistress.

Renunciation of title

On 29 December 1902 it was announced that the Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria had agreed to a request by Leopold to renounce his rank as an archduke.[3] His name was removed from the roll of the Order of the Golden Fleece and from the army list. He took the name Leopold Wölfling after a peak in the Ore Mountains. He was forbidden from entering Austrian lands and became a Swiss citizen. He was given a gift of 200,000 florins as well as a further 30,000 florins as income from his parents.

After World War I Wölfling's allowance from his family stopped. He returned to Austria and opened a delicatessen store in Vienna where he sold salami and olive oil.[4]

In 1924 Wölfling published a biography in Czech, Poslední Habsburkové: vzpomínky a úvahy (Last of the Habsburgs: Memories and Thoughts). In 1930 an English edition appeared with the title My Life Story: From Archduke to Grocer published in London by Hutchinson & Co. An American edition appeared in 1931 published in New York by Dutton. A German language edition appeared in 1935 published in Austria by Selle-Eysler.

Wölfling married three times:

  • Wilhelmine Abramovic (1877-1908)
  • Maria Ritter (1877-1938)
  • Clara Groger (1910-1941)

Wölfling died at Berlin.[5] His grave is preserved in the Protestant Friedhof III der Jerusalems- und Neuen Kirchengemeinde (Cemetery No. III of the congregations of Jerusalem's Church and New Church) in Berlin-Kreuzberg, south of Hallesches Tor.[6]

Titles ans styles

  • 2 December 1868  – 29 December 1902: His Imperial and Royal Highness Archduke Leopold Ferdinand of Austria, Prince Imperial of Austria, Prince Royal of Hungary and Bohemia, Prince of Tuscany
  • 29 December 1902  – 4 July 1935: Leopold Wölfling

Ancestry

References

  1. Nicholas Horthy, Memoirs ( London: Hutchinson, 1956), 70-71.
  2. Almanach de Gotha, 1902 (Gotha: Justus Perthes, 1902), 10.
  3. Wiener Zeitung (December 29, 1902), page 1.
  4. "Unser Anton", Time Magazine (December 9, 1929).
  5. "Ex-Archduke's Death In Poverty", The Times (July 5, 1935): 13.
  6. Royalty Travel Guide, Berlin, Kirchhof vor dem Halleschen Tor


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