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Ariobarzanes of Pontus: Wikis

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Ariobarzanes (in Greek Ἀριoβαρζάνης; reigned 266–c. 250 BC) was the second king of Pontus, succeeding his father Mithridates I Ctistes in 266 BC and died in an uncertain date between 258 and 240. He obtained possession of the city of Amastris in Paphlagonia, which was surrendered to him.[1] Ariobarzanes and his father sought the assistance of the Gauls, who had come into Asia Minor twelve years before the death of Mithridates, to expel the Egyptians sent by Ptolemy II Philadelphus.[2] Ariobarzanes was succeeded by Mithridates II.

Preceded by
Mithridates I
King of Pontus
266 BC – 250 BC
Succeeded by
Mithridates II

References

Notes

  1. ^ Memnon, 16, 24
  2. ^ Stephanus, Ethnica, s. v. Ancyra

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology by William Smith (1870).


Ariobarzanes (in Greek Ἀριoβαρζάνης; reigned 266–c. 250 BC) was the second king of Pontus, succeeding his father Mithridates I Ctistes in 266 BC and died in an uncertain date between 258 and 240. He obtained possession of the city of Amastris in Paphlagonia, which was surrendered to him.[1] Ariobarzanes and his father sought the assistance of the Gauls, who had come into Asia Minor twelve years before the death of Mithridates, to expel the Egyptians sent by Ptolemy II Philadelphus.[2] Ariobarzanes was succeeded by Mithridates II.

Preceded by
Mithridates I
King of Pontus
266 BC – 250 BC
Succeeded by
Mithridates II

References

Notes

Cite error: Invalid tag— no input is allowed. Use the {{Reflist}} template or the tag; see the help page.

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology by William Smith (1870).


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