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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An armistice is a situation in a war where the warring parties agree to stop fighting. It is not necessarily the end of a war, but may be just a cessation of hostilities while an attempt is made to negotiate a lasting peace. It is derived from the Latin arma, meaning weapons and statium, meaning a stopping.

A truce or ceasefire usually refers to a temporary cessation of hostilities for an agreed limited time or within a limited area. A truce may be needed in order to negotiate an armistice. An armistice is a modus vivendi and is not the same as a peace treaty, which may take months or even years to agree on. The 1953 Korean War armistice [1] was a major example of an armistice which was not followed by a peace treaty.

The United Nations Security Council often imposes or tries to impose cease-fire resolutions on parties in modern conflicts. Armistices are always negotiated between the parties themselves and are thus generally seen as more binding than non-mandatory UN cease-fire resolutions in modern international law.

The key aspect in an armistice is the fact that "all fighting ends with no one surrendering". This is in contrast to an unconditional surrender, which is a surrender without conditions, except for those provided by international law.

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Important armistices in history

The most notable armistice, and the one which is still meant when people in Europe say simply "The Armistice", is the armistice at the end of World War I, on 11 November 1918, signed near Compiègne, France, and effective at the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month." [2]

Armistice Day is still celebrated in many countries on the anniversary of that armistice; alternatively 11 November, or a Sunday near to it, may still be observed as a Remembrance Day.[3]

In the United States of America, November 11 is observed as Veterans' Day.

Other armistices in history

  • Armistice of Trung Gia signed by France and the Viet Minh on 20 July 1954 ending the First Indochina War.

References

  1. ^ "Text of the Korean War Armistice Agreement". FindLaw. 27 July 1953. http://news.findlaw.com/hdocs/docs/korea/kwarmagr072753.html. Retrieved 2007-01-04.  
  2. ^ "The Armistice". The War to End All Wars. FirstWorldWar.com. 1 May 2004. http://www.firstworldwar.com/features/armistice.htm. Retrieved 2007-01-04.  
  3. ^ "What is Remembrance Day?". CBBC Newsround. 10 November 2002. http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/find_out/guides/uk/remembrance_day/newsid_2438000/2438201.stm. Retrieved 2007-01-04.  
  4. ^ "1949 Armistice". Middle East, Land of Conflict. CNN. http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2001/mideast/stories/history.maps/armistice.html. Retrieved 2007-01-04.  

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

ARMISTICE (from Lat. arma, arms, and sistere, to stop), a suspension of hostilities by mutual agreement between two nations at war, or their respective forces. An armistice may be either general or particular; in the first case there is a complete cessation of hostile operations in every part of the dominions of the belligerent powers; in the second there is merely a temporary truce between two contending armies, or between a besieged fortress and the force besieging it. Such a temporary truce, when for a very limited period and for a special purpose, e.g. the collection of the wounded and the burial of the dead, is termed a suspension of arms. A general armistice cannot be concluded by the commanders-in-chief unless special authority has been previously delegated to them by their respective governments; otherwise any arrangement entered into by them requires subsequent ratification by the supreme powers of the states. A partial truce may be concluded by the officers of the respective powers, without any special authority from their governments, wherever, from the nature and extent of the commands they exercise, their duties could not be efficiently discharged without their possession of such a power. The conduct of belligerent parties during an armistice is usually regulated in modern warfare by express agreement between the parties, but where this is not the case the following general conditions may be laid down. (I) Each party may do, within the limits prescribed by the truce, whatever he could have done in time of peace. For example, he can raise troops, collect stores, receive reinforcements and fortify places that are not actually in a state of siege. (2) Neither party can take advantage of the armistice to do what he could not have done had military operations continued. Thus he cannot throw provisions or reinforcements into a besieged town, and neither besiegers nor besieged are at liberty to repair their fortifications or erect new works. (3) All things contained in places the possession of which was contested, must remain in the state in which they were before the armistice began. Any infringement by either party of the conditions of the truce entitles the other to recommence hostile operations without previous intimation.


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Simple English

An armistice is the effective end of a war, when the parties agree to stop fighting. The word comes from the Latin arma, meaning weapons and statium, meaning a stopping.

A truce or ceasefire usually refers to a temporary stop of hostilities for an agreed limited time or within a limited area. A truce may be needed in order to negotiate an armistice. An armistice is not the same as a peace treaty, which may take months or even years to agree on. The 1953 Korean War armistice [1] is a major example of an armistice which has not yet been followed by a peace treaty.

The United Nations Security Council often demands cease-fire of parties in modern conflicts. Armistices are always negotiated between the parties themselves and are thus generally seen as more binding than UN cease-fire resolutions in modern international law.

The most famous armistice is the Armistice with Germany at the end of World War I, on 11 November, 1918, signed near Compiègne, France, and effective at the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month." [2]

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