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Arrabah
Arrabah.jpg
Northern view
Arrabah is located in the Palestinian territories
Arrabah
Arabic عرّابة
Governorate Jenin
Government Municipality (from 1995)
Also spelled Arraba (officially)

Arrabeh (unofficially)

Coordinates 32°24′16.63″N 35°12′12.20″E / 32.4046194°N 35.203389°E / 32.4046194; 35.203389Coordinates: 32°24′16.63″N 35°12′12.20″E / 32.4046194°N 35.203389°E / 32.4046194; 35.203389
Population 13,000 (2006)
Jurisdiction

39,558  dunams (40.5 km²)

Head of Municipality Adib al-Ardah

Arrabah, (Arabic: عرّابة‎ 'Arrābah), or Arraba or Arrabeh, a Palestinian village in the northern West Bank that is about 13 kilometers to the south-west of Jenin. The village is about 350 meters above the sea level and lies near Sahl Arrabah, a 30-squared-kilometer plain that lies between the two groups of heights of Mount Carmel and Nablus. Arrabah currently has a population of approximately 10,000 that is entirely Muslim.[1]

Contents

History

The lands of Arrabah include Khirbet al-Hamam and Tel el-Muhafer, either of which believed to be the site of the Canaanite town Arubboth from the Books of Kings (Rubutu in the Egyptian documents) and the city Narbata of the Roman period.[2][3] In the nineteenth century the village was the main residence of the Abd al-Hadis, a feudalistic family that dominated over al-Sha'rawiyyah al-Sharqiyyah, an area that included about 20 villages in the Jenin Kaza .[4]

Notable people

References

  1. ^ Projected Mid -Year Population for Jenin Governorate by Locality 2004- 2006 Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics
  2. ^ Zertal, Adam; Arubboth, Hepher, and the Third Solomonic District, 1984: 72-76, 112-114, 133-136
  3. ^ Na'aman, Nadav; Canaan in the second millennium B.C.E., 2005: 212.
  4. ^ Doumani, 1995, Chapter: Egyptian rule, 1831-1840.

External links

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