Ash Ketchum: Wikis

  

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Ash Ketchum
Satoshidp.png
Ash Ketchum as seen in Pokémon: Diamond and Pearl series (Season 10+)
Series Pokémon
First game Pokémon Red and Blue
Created by Satoshi Tajiri
Designed by Ken Sugimori and Atsuko Nishida (video games), Sayuri Ichishi (anime season 1-8), Toshiya Yamada (anime season 10-present)
Voiced by (English) Veronica Taylor (anime, season 1-8), Sarah Natochenny (anime, season 9-present), Kayzie Rogers (The Mastermind of Mirage Pokémon)
Voiced by (Japanese) Rica Matsumoto

Ash Ketchum, known as Satoshi (サトシ?) for all appearances in Japan, is a fictional character in the Pokémon franchise owned by Nintendo. Created by Satoshi Tajiri as the protagonist of the video game Pokémon Red and Blue, the character has since appeared as the protagonist of the related anime and manga series, as well as on various merchandise related to the franchise. In Japanese, the character is voiced by Rica Matsumoto; in English, he was voiced by Veronica Taylor until the eighth season of the anime series, replaced by Sarah Natochenny for the remainder of the anime and Kayzie Rogers in the The Mastermind of Mirage Pokémon television special.

His dream is to become the greatest Pokémon trainer in the world. The name "Ketchum" is a pun on the 4Kids series' franchise's former tagline and slogan, "Gotta catch 'em all"!

Contents

Concept and creation

Named after his and Pokémon series creator Satoshi Tajiri,[1] Satoshi was designed by Ken Sugimori and Atsuko Nishida,[2] and intended to represent how Tajiri was as a child, obsessed with collecting creatures.[3] He first appeared as the player-controlled protagonist, in Pokémon Red and Blue, assuming the role of a Pokémon Trainer whose goal is to capture and train creatures called Pokémon, and use the creatures' special abilities to combat other Pokémon,[4][5] or utilize them for new ways to navigate the game's world, such as instantaneous travel between two areas.[6] An animated adaptation of the games later followed, with the character voiced by Rica Matsumoto and redesigned by Sayuri Ichishi.[2]

During localization of both for North American audiences, the character's name was changed in the anime to "Ash Ketchum", the first name taken from one of the possible default names players could select for the character in the games, and the surname tying into 4Kids former tagline for the series, "Gotta catch 'em all!"[7] In regards to the video games however, the character was unnamed, until the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver, in which the localized character name was changed to Red, tying in both with the original game appearance and one of the possible default names players could select in those titles.

Tajiri noted in an interview that between Japanese and American reactions to the series, Japanese consumers focused on the character Pikachu, while Americans purchased more items featuring Ash and Pikachu together. He stated that he felt the character represented the concept of the franchise, the human aspect, and was a necessity.[3] In both the games and anime, the character was given a rival, Shigeru. In an interview Tajiri noted the contrast between the character's relationship in the games and anime; while in the games they were rivals, in the anime, Shigeru represented Satoshi's master. When asked if in either instance Satoshi would surpass his rival, Tajiri replied "No! Never!"[1]

Veronica Taylor provided the voice of Ash in seasons 1–8.

Ash's character design was initially overseen by Sayuri Ichishi, replaced by Toshiya Yamada during the Diamond and Pearl storyline arc.

Voice acting

Veronica Taylor provided the voice of Ash in seasons one through eight of the English adaption of the Pokémon anime. After the script is translated from Japanese, the lines are adapted to fit the movements of the character's mouth (called lip flap). All the voices were recorded separately so Taylor was the only one in the booth when she recorded her lines, which took approximately six to eight hours. Taylor was often the first person to record so she had to "imagine how the previous line will be said. Luckily, I work with a great director who helps with the interpretation of the line, matching of the lip flap, and consistency of the voice." Taylor enjoyed playing Ash because of his "low, husky voice" and "energy and excitement".[8]

Taylor commented that Ash and the other characters "loosened up" after the first ten episodes of the anime; she believed the writers were more relaxed and did no longer feel the pressure of making sure everything was done correctly. Taylor commented: "I enjoy playing [Ash] now much more than I did in the very beginning because I can have fun with him more, and we kind of know him and can work out how he really would react. We have the classic Ash responses and things like that."[8] Sarah Natochenny replaced Taylor in season nine when Pokémon International took over the dubbing rights. In Japan, Rica Matsumoto provides the voice of Ash.

Appearances

In video games

Red, the silent protagonist of Pokémon Red, Blue, and Yellow and its remakes, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, has several default names, one of which is "Red". Others include "Ash" (later used for anime character Ash Ketchum) and "Jack". In the game, Red is a young (assumed to be 10 years old) boy from Pallet Town. His adventure begins one day when Professor Oak calls the two of them to his lab and gives them each a choice of Pokémon. After receiving their Pokémon, Blue challenges Red to a battle. Later, Professor Oak summons both Red and Blue and gives them both a Pokédex each, and sends them on a journey to fulfil his dream of capturing every type of Pokémon.

In addition to the anime, Ash has made appearances in video games and manga. The only video game that Ash has truly appeared in to date is Pokémon Puzzle League, where he tries to become a Pokémon Puzzle Master.

In the anime

At the start of the series, ten year old Ash is starting out as a beginner Pokémon trainer in Pallet Town, his hometown. After receiving Pikachu as a starter Pokémon from Professor Oak, Ash left Pallet Town to start his journey. Since his departure, Ash has traveled the World of Pokémon, competed in many challenges, and caught newer Pokémon. He currently travels with Dawn and Brock in Sinnoh. He is working towards earning his last badge in Sinnoh—the Beacon Badge.

Ash has considerably improved his abilities as a trainer over the course of the series. However, his earnestness and determination remain the same. During the first season of the series, Ash trained to catch more Pokémon than his childhood rival, Gary Oak, although Gary was always shown to be the stronger trainer. He soon began to focus more on each of his Pokémon's abilities. Ash's primary nemesis is a group of antagonists named Team Rocket. Ever since the second episode, "Pokémon Emergency!", two Team Rocket operatives named Jessie and James, along with a talking Meowth, have tried to steal his first Pokémon, Pikachu as well as many others, but have always failed. Despite their constant antagonism, they occasionally put their differences aside and work together against a common adversary, such as in Pokémon: The Movie 2000, where they aid Ash in retrieving the three treasures in order to save the world.

In printed adaptations

The portrayals of Ash in the manga The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pocket Monster Zensho, and Ash & Pikachu, are very similar to the one in the anime. There are key differences in the manga, though. In The Electric Tale of Pikachu, it is based on Ash's journey up until the end of the Orange Islands travel. Ash is usually seen traveling by himself during the course of this manga although he is joined by Misty and Brock in Indigo sometimes. Misty is the only one to join Ash in the Orange Islands. At the end of the series, The Ash & Pikachu manga is similar, although it has the episodes from the anime like "The Fortune Hunters" and "A Goldenrod Opportunity" combined, but with a couple of changes. In Pocket Monsters Zensho, Satoshi (as Ash is known in Japanese) starts with Charmander instead of Pikachu. The manga ends at the Indigo Plateau, where Satoshi defeats the Elite Four. Manga author Toshihiro Ono cited Ash as one of his favorite characters to draw for the series, stating "I want to go on a trip with Misty just like him! (And forget about job, rent, etc.)".[9]

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Red' is a Pokémon trainer and the protagonist of the first saga. Red starts off in Pallet Town as an aspiring trainer, and gets a Bulbasaur (later evolves all the way into a Venusaur) and a Pokédex from Professor Oak. He also has a Poliwhirl which he has known since childhood that evolves into a Poliwrath, and uses these two Pokémon on his adventure. He later captures a mischievous Pikachu, and, after working to gain its trust, it becomes one of Red's top three Pokémon. Antagonists include his rival, Oak’s grandson Blue, who was granted Charmander; Green, another Pokémon trainer from Pallet Town, who stole a Squirtle from Professor Oak; and Team Rocket, an organization bent on world domination through Pokémon.

Critical reception

The book The Japanification of Children's Popular Culture cited Ash as an example of consumer identification, with the character going through similar motions players of the games had to in order to progress through them.[10] It additionally emphasized the character's growth and development as the anime series progressed.[11]

References

  1. ^ a b "The Ultimate Game Freak". Time Asia 154 (20): 2. 22 November 1999. http://www.time.com/time/asia/magazine/99/1122/pokemon6.fullinterview1.html. Retrieved 2009-09-25. 
  2. ^ a b "Pokeani Data". http://pokeani.com/episodefolda/anime-pokemonag.html. Retrieved 2008-03-20. 
  3. ^ a b "The Ultimate Game Freak". Time Asia 154 (20): 1. 22 November 1999. http://www.time.com/time/asia/magazine/99/1122/pokemon6.fullinterview1.html. Retrieved 2009-09-25. 
  4. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue, Instruction manual. Nintendo. pp. 6–7. 
  5. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue, Instruction manual. Nintendo. p. 11. 
  6. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. (Nintendo). (September 30, 1998) "HM02 is FLY. It will take you back to any town."
  7. ^ Tobin, Joseph Jay (2004). Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press. p. 16. ISBN 0-822-33287-6. 
  8. ^ a b "Veronica Taylor interview". Animerica (Viz Media) 8 (6). August 2000. http://www.veronicataylor.net/faqs.html. Retrieved 2009-12-10. 
  9. ^ "Animerica Interview Toshihiro Ono". VIZ Media. Archived from the original on 2000-05-10. http://web.archive.org/web/20000510020712/http://www.vizkids.com/pokemon/news_interview.shtml. Retrieved 2009-08-05. 
  10. ^ West, Mark I. (2008). The Japanification of Children's Popular Culture. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 63. ISBN 0810851210. 
  11. ^ West, Mark I. (2008). The Japanification of Children's Popular Culture. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 78. ISBN 0810851210. 

Simple English

Template:Pokémon Character

Ash Ketchum is an anthroporphic boy character from the Pokémon video games and anime. He is the main character in the television show and in the first three games. In the television show he is often with his friends, Dawn and Brock. He has black hair and eyes. His first Pokemon animal was a lightning-tailed mouse named Pikachu. Ash was identical to Christopher Thorndyke in Sonic X, because of the version of his hair.

Contents

Concept and creation

Named after his and Pokémon series creator Satoshi Tajiri,[1] Satoshi was designed by Ken Sugimori and Atsuko Nishida,[2] and intended to represent how Tajiri was as a child, obsessed with collecting creatures.[3] He first appeared as the player-controlled protagonist, in Pokémon Red and Blue, assuming the role of a Pokémon Trainer whose goal is to capture and train creatures called Pokémon, and use the creatures' special abilities to combat other Pokémon,[4][5] or utilize them for new ways to navigate the game's world, such as instantaneous travel between two areas.[6] An animated adaptation of the games later followed, with the character voiced by Rica Matsumoto and redesigned by Sayuri Ichishi.[2]

During localization of both for North American audiences, the character's name was changed in the anime to "Ash Ketchum", the first name taken from one of the possible default names players could select for the character in the games, and the surname tying into 4Kids former tagline for the series, "Gotta catch 'em all!"[7] In regards to the video games however, the character was unnamed, until the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver, in which the localized character name was changed to Red, tying in both with the original game appearance and one of the possible default names players could select in those titles.

Tajiri noted in an interview that between Japanese and American reactions to the series, Japanese consumers focused on the character Pikachu, while Americans purchased more items featuring Ash and Pikachu together. He stated that he felt the character represented the concept of the franchise, the human aspect, and was a necessity.[3] In both the games and anime, the character was given a rival, Shigeru. In an interview Tajiri noted the contrast between the character's relationship in the games and anime; while in the games they were rivals, in the anime, Shigeru represented Satoshi's master. When asked if in either instance Satoshi would surpass his rival, Tajiri replied "No! Never!"[1]

File:6.8.
Veronica Taylor provided the voice of Ash in seasons 1–8.

Ash's character design was initially overseen by Sayuri Ichishi, replaced by Toshiya Yamada during the Diamond and Pearl storyline arc.

Voice acting

Veronica Taylor provided the voice of Ash in seasons one through eight of the English adaption of the Pokémon anime. After the script is translated from Japanese, the lines are adapted to fit the movements of the character's mouth (called lip flap). All the voices were recorded separately so Taylor was the only one in the booth when she recorded her lines, which took approximately six to eight hours. Taylor was often the first person to record so she had to "imagine how the previous line will be said. Luckily, I work with a great director who helps with the interpretation of the line, matching of the lip flap, and consistency of the voice." Taylor enjoyed playing Ash because of his "low, husky voice" and "energy and excitement".[8]

Taylor commented that Ash and the other characters "loosened up" after the first ten episodes of the anime; she believed the writers were more relaxed and did no longer feel the pressure of making sure everything was done correctly. Taylor commented: "I enjoy playing [Ash] now much more than I did in the very beginning because I can have fun with him more, and we kind of know him and can work out how he really would react. We have the classic Ash responses and things like that."[8] Sarah Natochenny replaced Taylor in season nine when Pokémon International took over the dubbing rights. In Japan, Rica Matsumoto provides the voice of Ash.

Appearances

In video games

Red, the silent protagonist of Pokémon Red, Blue, and Yellow and its remakes, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, has several default names, one of which is "Red". Others include "Ash" (later used for anime character Ash Ketchum) and "Jack". In the game, Red is a young (assumed to be 10 years old) boy from Pallet Town. His adventure begins one day when Professor Oak calls the two of them to his lab and gives them each a choice of Pokémon. After receiving their Pokémon, Blue challenges Red to a battle. Later, Professor Oak summons both Red and Blue and gives them both a Pokédex each, and sends them on a journey to fulfil his dream of capturing every type of Pokémon.

In addition to the anime, Ash has made appearances in video games and manga. The only video game that Ash has truly appeared in to date is Pokémon Puzzle League, where he tries to become a Pokémon Puzzle Master.

In the anime

At the start of the series, ten year old Ash is starting out as a beginner Pokémon trainer in Pallet Town, his hometown. After receiving Pikachu as a starter Pokémon from Professor Oak, Ash left Pallet Town to start his journey. Since his departure, Ash has traveled the World of Pokémon, competed in many challenges, and caught newer Pokémon. He currently travels with Dawn and Brock in Sinnoh. He is working towards earning his last badge in Sinnoh—the Beacon Badge.

Ash has considerably improved his abilities as a trainer over the course of the series. However, his earnestness and determination remain the same. During the first season of the series, Ash trained to catch more Pokémon than his childhood rival, Gary Oak, although Gary was always shown to be the stronger trainer. He soon began to focus more on each of his Pokémon's abilities. Ash's primary nemesis is a group of antagonists named Team Rocket. Ever since the second episode, "Pokémon Emergency!", two Team Rocket operatives named Jessie and James, along with a talking Meowth, have tried to steal his first Pokémon, Pikachu as well as many others, but have always failed. Despite their constant antagonism, they occasionally put their differences aside and work together against a common adversary, such as in Pokémon: The Movie 2000, where they aid Ash in retrieving the three treasures in order to save the world.

In printed adaptations

The portrayals of Ash in the manga The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pocket Monster Zensho, and Ash & Pikachu, are very similar to the one in the anime. There are key differences in the manga, though. In The Electric Tale of Pikachu, it is based on Ash's journey up until the end of the Orange Islands travel. Ash is usually seen traveling by himself during the course of this manga although he is joined by Misty and Brock in Indigo sometimes. Misty is the only one to join Ash in the Orange Islands. At the end of the series, The Ash & Pikachu manga is similar, although it has the episodes from the anime like "The Fortune Hunters" and "A Goldenrod Opportunity" combined, but with a couple of changes. In Pocket Monsters Zensho, Satoshi (as Ash is known in Japanese) starts with Charmander instead of Pikachu. The manga ends at the Indigo Plateau, where Satoshi defeats the Elite Four. Manga author Toshihiro Ono cited Ash as one of his favorite characters to draw for the series, stating "I want to go on a trip with Misty just like him! (And forget about job, rent, etc.)".[9]

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Red' is a Pokémon trainer and the protagonist of the first saga. Red starts off in Pallet Town as an aspiring trainer, and gets a Bulbasaur (later evolves all the way into a Venusaur) and a Pokédex from Professor Oak. He also has a Poliwhirl which he has known since childhood that evolves into a Poliwrath, and uses these two Pokémon on his adventure. He later captures a mischievous Pikachu, and, after working to gain its trust, it becomes one of Red's top three Pokémon. Antagonists include his rival, Oak’s grandson Blue, who was granted Charmander; Green, another Pokémon trainer from Pallet Town, who stole a Squirtle from Professor Oak; and Team Rocket, an organization bent on world domination through Pokémon.

Critical reception

The book The Japanification of Children's Popular Culture cited Ash as an example of consumer identification, with the character going through similar motions players of the games had to in order to progress through them.[10] It additionally emphasized the character's growth and development as the anime series progressed.[11]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "The Ultimate Game Freak". Time Asia 154 (20): 2. 22 November 1999. http://www.time.com/time/asia/magazine/99/1122/pokemon6.fullinterview1.html. Retrieved 2009-09-25. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Pokeani Data". http://pokeani.com/episodefolda/anime-pokemonag.html. Retrieved 2008-03-20. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 "The Ultimate Game Freak". Time Asia 154 (20): 1. 22 November 1999. http://www.time.com/time/asia/magazine/99/1122/pokemon6.fullinterview1.html. Retrieved 2009-09-25. 
  4. Template:Cite manual
  5. Template:Cite manual
  6. Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. Nintendo. (September 30, 1998) “HM02 is FLY. It will take you back to any town.”
  7. Tobin, Joseph Jay (2004). Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press. p. 16. ISBN 0-822-33287-6. 
  8. 8.0 8.1 "Veronica Taylor interview". Animerica (Viz Media) 8 (6). August 2000. http://www.veronicataylor.net/faqs.html. Retrieved 2009-12-10. 
  9. "Animerica Interview Toshihiro Ono". VIZ Media. Archived from the original on 2000-05-10. http://web.archive.org/web/20000510020712/http://www.vizkids.com/pokemon/news_interview.shtml. Retrieved 2009-08-05. 
  10. West, Mark I. (2008). The Japanification of Children's Popular Culture. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 63. ISBN 0810851210. 
  11. West, Mark I. (2008). The Japanification of Children's Popular Culture. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 78. ISBN 0810851210. 

Template:Pokémon series








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