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The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) is a commercial enterprise which attempts to regulate the quality and safety of fodder and pet food in the United States. AAFCO is a voluntary organization comprised largely of regulatory officials who have responsibility for enforcing their state’s laws and regulations concerning the safety of animal feeds. Its members are representatives from each state in the United States, and from Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, Canada, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Unlike the FDA, AAFCO has no regulatory authority. However, its regulations on feed ingredients for a number of animals are adopted by most states. In 2007, the Center for Veterinary Medicine at the FDA formalized its relationship with AAFCO in identifying feed ingredients.[1]

Notes

  1. ^ FDA, AAFCO sign agreement on feed ingredient listing. FDA, Center for Veterinary Medicine. Retrieved 2008-08-26.

Sources

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "FDA, AAFCO sign agreement on feed ingredient listing, Food and Drug Administration".

Further information


The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) is a non-profit organization which sets standards for the quality and safety of animal feed (fodder) and pet food in the United States. AAFCO is a voluntary organization consisting largely of state officials who have responsibility for enforcing their state’s laws and regulations concerning the safety of animal feeds. AAFCO also establishes standard ingredient definitions and nutritional requirements for animal feed/pet food. Most states have adopted the AAFCO models or use them in the regulation of animal feed/pet food[1]. AAFCO meets twice yearly, typically in January and August, so that committees and the board of directors can conduct the organization’s business of assessing the need for changes to the Model Bill, model regulations, ingredient definitions, etc.[2]. Once per year the latest version of all AAFCO-approved documents are printed in the organization’s Official Publication[3].

Its voting members are representatives from each state in the United States, and from Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, Canada, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Additionally, there are non-voting advisors on each AAFCO committee who are mainly from industry, such as the National Grain and Feed Association, Pet Food Institute, and American Feed Industry Association. AAFCO meets twice per year, in January and August, to conduct its business[4]..

Unlike the FDA, AAFCO has no regulatory authority. However, AAFCO members have enforcement authority in their respective state or federal agency. The AAFCO model regulations on feed ingredients have been adopted by many states; other states have adopted similar regulations. In 2007, the Center for Veterinary Medicine at the FDA formalized its relationship with AAFCO in identifying feed ingredients.[5]

Notes

Sources

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "FDA, AAFCO sign agreement on feed ingredient listing, Food and Drug Administration".

Further information

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