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The Athens School of Fine Arts (Greek: Ανώτατη Σχολή Καλών Τεχνών), is Greece's premier art school whose main objective is to develop the artistic talents of its students.

Contents

History

Athens School of Fine Arts was established on 12 January 1837, known as the School for the Arts. In the beginning the School of Arts included three departments: the Crafts' School (part-time school), Industrial Crafts' School (full-time school) and Fine Arts School (full-time higher education).

The third department was the real ancestor of today’s School of Fine Arts and began to function as a daily school in 1840. In this department subjects like painting, sculpture, architecture, lithography, woodcut, geometry and cartography were taught. The same year Duchess of Plaisance who lived in Greece contributed in upgrading the school. She enriched the school's program with new types of painting lessons and called the French painter Bonirote (one of Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres's students) in order to teach oil painting courses. Bonirote was a teacher there until 1843.

In 1843 with royal decree School of Fine Arts was promoted in a five-year study Higher Education School. Director of the School was the famous architect Lissandros Kautantzoglou. During the period 1844–1862 the studies' program was influenced by Europe's Academies of Fine Arts which taught neoclassicism. Some of the great students of this period finally became teachers in the school. Some of them are Nikiphoros Lytras and Nicholaos Gysis. In 1872, after a donation of George Averoff, a new building in Patission Avenue road was constructed that was later named National Technical University of Athens.

In 1910 the faculty acquired the independence from the named National Technical University. The same year the first for women were accepted to the School of Fine Arts. In 1929 Konstantinos Parthenis started teaching in the school. His lessons were mostly about the analysis of visual perception and the plastic transformation of the incoming visual information. Many other famous artists were occupied in Athens School of Fine Arts: the sculptor Costas Dimitriadis, the engraver Yannis Kefallinos, the writer and historian Pantelis Prebelakis. Since 1947 Yiannis Moralis, Georgios Mauroidis, Constantinos Grammatopoulos and Spyros Papaloukas, Panayiotis Tetsis, Nikos Kessanlis, Dimitris Mytaras, Georgios Nikolaidis, Ilias Dekoylakos and the architect Savvas Kontaratos taught the principles of Modern Greek art.

References

External links

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The Athens School of Fine Arts (Greek: Ανώτατη Σχολή Καλών Τεχνών), is Greece's premier art school[citation needed] whose main objective is to develop the artistic talents of its students.

Contents

History

Athens School of Fine Arts was established on 12 January 1837, known as the School for the Arts. In the beginning the School of Arts included three departments: the Crafts' School (part-time school), Industrial Crafts' School (full-time school) and Fine Arts School (full-time higher education).

The third department was the real ancestor of today’s School of Fine Arts and began to function as a daily school in 1840. In this department subjects like painting, sculpture, architecture, lithography, woodcut, geometry and cartography were taught. The same year Duchess of Plaisance who lived in Greece contributed in upgrading the school. She enriched the school's program with new types of painting lessons and called the French painter Bonirote (one of Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres's students) in order to teach oil painting courses. Bonirote was a teacher there until 1843.

In 1843 with royal decree School of Fine Arts was promoted in a five-year study Higher Education School. Director of the School was the famous architect Lissandros Kautantzoglou. During the period 1844–1862 the studies' program was influenced by Europe's Academies of Fine Arts which taught neoclassicism. Some of the great students of this period finally became teachers in the school. Some of them are Nikiphoros Lytras and Nicholaos Gysis. In 1872, after a donation of George Averoff, a new building in Patission Avenue road was constructed that was later named National Technical University of Athens.

In 1910 the faculty acquired the independence from the named National Technical University. The same year the first for women were accepted to the School of Fine Arts. In 1929 Konstantinos Parthenis started teaching in the school. His lessons were mostly about the analysis of visual perception and the plastic transformation of the incoming visual information. Many other famous artists were occupied in Athens School of Fine Arts: the sculptor Costas Dimitriadis, the engraver Yannis Kefallinos, the writer and historian Pantelis Prebelakis. Since 1947 Yiannis Moralis, Georgios Mauroidis, Constantinos Grammatopoulos and Spyros Papaloukas, Panayiotis Tetsis, Nikos Kessanlis, Dimitris Mytaras, Georgios Nikolaidis, Ilias Dekoylakos and the architect Savvas Kontaratos taught the principles of Modern Greek art.

References

External links


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