Aubrey Huff: Wikis

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Aubrey Huff

San Francisco Giants — No. --
Designated hitter / First baseman / Third baseman / Outfielder
Born: December 20, 1976 (1976-12-20) (age 33)
Marion, Ohio
Bats: Left Throws: Right 
MLB debut
August 2, 2000 for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays
Career statistics
(through 2009 season)
Batting average     .282
Home runs     203
Runs batted in     752
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Aubrey Lewis Huff (born December 20, 1976, in Marion, Ohio) is a Major League Baseball first baseman who is currently playing for the San Francisco Giants.

Contents

Early life

His father, Aubrey II, was killed as an innocent bystander in a workplace domestic dispute when Aubrey was 6 years old. Aubrey II was shot attempting to take away a gun from a man who had just shot his wife.[1]

High school career

Huff grew up in Mineral Wells, Texas. He attended Mineral Wells High School, then transferred to Brewer High School in Fort Worth, Texas before junior year. At Brewer High School, Huff was an All-District baseball player and also excelled in basketball.

University of Miami

After attending Vernon College in North Texas, Huff transferred to the University of Miami and, as a junior, was named second team "All-American" by Baseball Weekly. In his final season, he set a University of Miami season record with 95 RBIs and led the Hurricanes in home runs (21), doubles (20) and total bases (179).

During his two seasons, the Hurricanes had a 102–30 record and, in 1998, the team set school records for home runs, RBIs, slugging percentage and total bases. Huff led the team with 21 home runs and a school record 95 RBIs. He garnered first team All-American honors from Baseball America, The Sporting News and the National Collegiate Baseball Writers' Association.

For his career, his .400 batting average is second all-time, and he is third with a .719 slugging percentage. He is tied for three individual game records: most runs, five (3/28/97 vs. Harvard); most doubles, four (5/16/97 vs. Ga. Tech); and most home runs in an inning, two (5/21/98 vs. Bowling Green). His 1998 stats include a.768 slugging percentage (second highest in school history), a .412 batting average (fourth highest), 179 total bases (fourth highest) and 21 home runs (fifth highest).

Huff was inducted into the University of Miami Sports Hall of Fame as a member of the Class of 2009, with a ceremony that took place at the University of Miami baseball team's 2009 home opener on Friday, February 20, 2009. Former teammate Pat Burrell drove down from Tampa for the on-field ceremony where Aubrey was given his Hall of Fame ring, plaque, and jacket.

Professional career

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Tampa Bay Devil Rays

Out of the University of Miami, Huff was Tampa Bay's fifth-round selection in the 1998 draft and quickly advanced through the minor league system. He was named the Devil Rays' "Minor League Player of the Year" in 2000 at Durham and International League Rookie of the Year. Huff made his major league debut later that year and spent the final two months of the season with the Rays, where he hit .287.

In 2002, Huff ended the season with a .313 batting average, leading the Devil Rays. He then hit 34 home runs—another team high—during the 2003 season, adding 107 RBIs while sporting a .311 batting average that also led the club.

Houston Astros

On July 12, 2006, the Houston Astros acquired Huff from the Tampa Bay Devil Rays for minor leaguers Mitch Talbot and Ben Zobrist. In his debut with the Astros on July 13, Huff went 2-4 with a three-run homer.

Baltimore Orioles

Huff with the Tigers.

On December 30, 2006 Huff signed a 3-year $20 million contract with the Orioles.

2008

Before the 2008 season, Huff switched his uniform number from 19 to 17, in honor of his former teammate Joe Kennedy, who died during the previous offseason.[2] He was named AL Player of the Week in July 2008 after hitting .345 with three home runs and nine RBIs.[3] At the end of the season, Huff was named "Most Valuable Oriole," and was awarded the 2008 Silver Slugger award at DH and won the Edgar Martinez Award for best designated hitter in the league.

The 2009 season saw Huff play more regularly at first base.[4]

Detroit Tigers

On August 17, 2009, Huff cleared waivers and was traded to the Detroit Tigers in exchange for pitching prospect Brett Jacobson.[5]

San Francisco Giants

On January 10, 2010, Huff agreed to a 1-year $3 million contract with the San Francisco Giants the deal will not be official until he passes a physical.[6]

On January 12, 2010, Huff officially signed a 1 year $ 3 million contract with the San Francisco Giants. The deal will be announced on January 13, 2010.[7]

Legacy

Huff has hit 200 career home runs, placing him in the Top 400 (tied 313th overall) players by total career home runs. He hit for the cycle on June 29, 2007, a night on which he also made his 1000th hit, and 200th double. He is one of four Orioles to hit for the cycle (Brooks Robinson, Cal Ripken, Jr., and Felix Pie). He was the first player to do so at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. He remains the Devil Rays' all time leader in home runs and intentional walks, along with several single-season records.

Huff has played at five different positions in his career: third base, first base, left field, right field, and as designated hitter.

Controversy

On November 13, 2007, on an appearance of Bubba the Love Sponge show, Huff described Baltimore as "a horseshit city" when asked about the city's night life. He later said his remarks were taken out of context and he was only commenting on the city's night life.[8]

Family

Huff married the former Barbara "Baubi" Heaton on January 27, 2007. They reside in Tampa, Florida, in the offseason[1].

See also

References

External links


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