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Australian federal election, 1990: Wikis

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1987 Australia 1993
Australian federal election, 1990
All 148 seats in the Australian House of Representatives
and 40 (of the 76) seats in the Australian Senate
March 24, 1990 (1990-03-24)
First party Second party
BobHawke(cropped).jpg Andrew Peacock.jpg
Leader Bob Hawke Andrew Peacock
Party Labor Liberal/National coalition
Leader since 3 February 1983 9 May 1989
Leader's seat Wills Kooyong
Last election 86 seats 62 seats
Seats won 78 69
Seat change -8 +7
Popular vote 4,930,834 4,950,069
Percentage 49.90% 50.10%
Swing -0.93% +0.93%

Federal elections were held in Australia on 24 March 1990. All 148 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Bob Hawke defeated the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by Andrew Peacock with coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by Charles Blunt.

Contents

Results

House of Reps (IRV) — 1990-93 — Turnout 95.31% (CV) — Informal 3.19%
  Party Votes % Swing Seats Change
  Australian Labor Party 3,904,138 39.44 -6.39 78 -8
  Liberal Party of Australia 3,468,570 35.04 +0.48 55 +12
  Australian Democrats 1,114,216 11.26 +5.22 0 0
  National Party of Australia 833,557 8.42 -3.10 14 -5
  Independents 252,116 2.55 +0.94 1 +1
  Other 327,077 3.30 +2.85 0 0
  Total 9,899,674     148  
  Australian Labor Party WIN 49.90 -0.93 78 -8
  Liberal/National coalition   50.10 +0.93 69 +7

Independents: Ted Mack

Senate (STV GV) — 1990-93 — Turnout 95.81% (CV) — Informal 3.40%
  Party Votes % Swing Seats Won Seats Held
  Australian Labor Party 3,813,547 38.41 -4.42 15 32
  Liberal/National (Joint Ticket) 2,429,552 24.47 +10.70 5  
  Liberal Party of Australia 1,445,872 14.56 -6.41 12 28
  Australian Democrats 1,253,807 12.63 +4.15 5 8
  National Party of Australia 258,164 2.60 -4.49 1 5
  Australian Greens 201,618 2.03 * 0 0
  WA Greens 76,381 0.77 * 1 1
  Country Liberal Party 29,045 0.29 +0.08 1 1
  Other 421,779 4.25 -0.56 0 0
  Harradine Group 1
  Total 9,929,765     40 76


Background

The 1990 election resulted in a swing to the Coalition, which was attributed to the late 80's/early 90's recession, although Labor retained government. This was Labor’s fourth successive electoral victory with Bob Hawke as leader, a level of political success which no previous Labor government or Labor leader had enjoyed. The election was to be Hawke’s last as Prime Minister and Australian Labor Party leader; he was replaced by Paul Keating in December 1991.

John Howard lost the 1987 election to Hawke, and Andrew Peacock was elected Deputy Leader in a show of party unity. In May 1989 Peacock's supporters mounted a party room coup which returned Peacock to the leadership. Peacock, now 50, cultivated a new mature image, enhanced by a second marriage to Margaret St George. Hawke's Treasurer, Paul Keating, ridiculed him by asking: "Can the soufflé rise twice?" and calling him "all feathers and no meat." Although Hawke's government was in political trouble, with high interest rates and a financial crisis in Victoria, Peacock failed to defeat Hawke at the 1990 elections and he subsequently resigned.

This election saw the peak of the Australian Democrats' popularity under Janine Haines, and a WA Greens candidate won a seat in the Australian Senate for the first time - although the successful candidate, Jo Vallentine, was already a two-term senator, having previously won a seat for the Nuclear Disarmament Party at the 1984 election, and the Vallentine Peace Group at the 1987 election. As of 2008, this has been the only post-war election where a third party (excluding splinter state parties and the Nationals) has won more than 10% of the primary vote for elections to the Australian House of Representatives.

See also

Notes

References

External links


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