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Australian federal election, 1993: Wikis

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1990 Australia 1996
Australian federal election, 1993
All 147 seats in the Australian House of Representatives
and 40 (of the 76) seats in the Australian Senate
13 March 1993 (1993-03-13)
First party Second party
Paul Keating 1979.jpg Replace this image male.svg
Leader Paul Keating John Hewson
Party Labor Liberal/National coalition
Leader since 20 December 1991 (1991-12-20) 3 April 1990 (1990-04-03)
Leader's seat Blaxland Wentworth
Last election 78 seats 69 seats
Seats won 80 65
Seat change +2 -4
Popular vote 5,436,421 5,133,033
Percentage 51.44% 48.56%
Swing +1.54% -1.54%

Federal elections were held in Australia on 13 March 1993. All 147 seats in the House of Representatives, and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate, were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Prime Minister of Australia Paul Keating defeated the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by John Hewson with coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by Tim Fischer.

Contents

House Results

House of Reps (IRV) — 1993-96 — Turnout 95.75% (CV) — Informal 2.97%
  Party Votes % Swing Seats Change
  Australian Labor Party 4,751,390 44.92 +5.49 80 +2
  Liberal Party of Australia 3,923,786 37.10 +2.06 49 -6
  National Party of Australia 758,036 7.17 -1.25 16 +2
  Australian Democrats 397,060 3.75 -7.51 0 0
  Australian Greens 196,702 1.86 * 0 0
  Independents 328,084 3.10 +0.56 2 +1
  Other 221,721 2.10 -1.21 0 0
  Total 10,576,779     147 -1
  Australian Labor Party WIN 51.44 +1.54 80 +2
  Liberal/National coalition   48.56 -1.54 65 -4

Independents: Ted Mack, Phil Cleary

Senate Results

Senate (STV GV) — 1993-96 — Turnout 96.22% (CV) — Informal 2.55%
  Party Votes % Swing Seats Won Seats Held
  Australian Labor Party 4,643,871 43.50 +5.10 17 30
  Liberal/National (Joint Ticket) 2,605,157 24.40 -0.06 6  
  Liberal Party of Australia 1,664,204 15.59 +1.03 11 29
  Australian Democrats 566,944 5.31 -7.32 2 7
  National Party of Australia 290,382 2.72 +0.12 1 6
  Australian Greens 263,106 2.46 +0.43 0 0
  WA Greens 53,757 0.50 -0.27 1 2
  Country Liberal Party 35,405 0.33 +0.04 1 1
  Harradine Group 32,202 0.30 -0.10 1 1
  Other 519,777 4.87 +0.62 0 0
  Total 10,674,805     40 76


Background

This was the first election after the full totality of the late 80s/early 90s recession. The opposition Liberal Party, under John Hewson, launched Fightback!, a radical prescription of tough, economically "dry" measures, including a radical overhaul of Medicare and Industrial Relations. But the contentious 15% Goods and Services Tax was the centrepiece of the campaign. Hewson had been forced by pressure group activity and public opinion to exempt food from the proposed GST, but this was not enough against the formidable campaigning skills of Paul Keating. The complexity surrounding what food was and wasn't to be exempt from the GST, and John Hewson's subsequent difficulty in explaining this to the Australian electorate was exemplified in the famous Birthday Cake Interview, considered by some as a turning point in the whole campaign.

For the first time since 1966, this election saw the incumbent government obtain both an increased share of the vote and an increased majority in the House of Representatives.

There was an unusual circumstance in the seat of Dickson. One of the candidates, an independent, died very shortly before the election, making it necessary to hold a unique 'special election' on 17 April. Following the return of the Labor Party to government, Keating announced the makeup of his new ministry to be sworn in on 24 March, but kept the portfolio of Attorney-General open for Michael Lavarch subject to him winning Dickson on 17 April. He won the seat, and was appointed to the ministry on 27 April.

See also

Notes

References


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