Austrian euro coins: Wikis

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Austrian euro coins have a unique design for each denomination, with a common theme for each of the three series of coins. The minor coins feature Austrian flowers, the middle coins examples of architecture from Austria's capital, Vienna, and the two major coins famous Austrians. All designs are by the hand of Josef Kaiser and also include the 12 stars of the EU and the year of imprint.

Contents

Austrian euro design

For images of the common side and a detailed description of the coins, see euro coins.

Depiction of Austrian euro coinage | Obverse side
€ 0.01 € 0.02 € 0.05
1 euro cent Austria.gif Eurocoin.at.002.gif Eurocoin.at.005.gif
The gentian, a flower of the Austrian Alps The edelweiss, a flower of the Austrian Alps The primrose, a flower of the Austrian Alps
€ 0.10 € 0.20 € 0.50
Eurocoin.at.010.gif Eurocoin.at.020.gif Eurocoin.at.050.gif
St. Stephen's Cathedral, Viennese Gothic architecture The Belvedere Palace, an example of the Baroque The Secession Building, an example of art nouveau
€ 1.00 € 2.00 € 2 Coin Edge
Eurocoin.at.100.gif 2 Euro coin At.gif "2 EURO" with ***, repeated 4 times alternately upright and inverted.
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart,
famous Austrian composer
Bertha von Suttner, the Austrian radical pacifist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate
Description Image
The Austrian design features a Alpine gentian as a symbol of Austria's part in developing EU environmental policy. The words "EIN EURO CENT" (one euro cent) appear at the top with a hatched Austrian flag below with the date. 1 euro cent Austria.gif
The Austrian design features a Alpine edelweiss as a symbol of Austria's part in developing EU environmental policy. The words "ZWEI EURO CENT" (two euro cent) appear at the top with a hatched Austrian flag below with the date. Eurocoin.at.002.gif
The Austrian design features a Alpine primroses as a symbol of Austria's part in developing EU environmental policy. The words "FÜNF EURO CENT" (five euro cent) appear at the top with a hatched Austrian flag below with the date. Eurocoin.at.005.gif
The Austrian design features St. Stephen's Cathedral, the epitome of Viennese gothic architecture dating to 1160. The denomination appear at the top, followed by a hatched Austrian flag and the date appearing to the right curving with the inner circle. Eurocoin.at.010.gif
The Austrian design features the Belvedere Palace, an example of baroque architecture, symbolising national freedom and sovereignty due to the fact it was at Belvedere where the 1955 treaty re-establishing Austrian sovereignty was signed. The words "euro cent" appear at the top, with the denomination, followed by a hatched Austrian flag and the date, appears below (but within the circle). Eurocoin.at.020.gif
The Austrian design features the Secession Building within a circle, symbolising the birth of art nouveau and anew age in the country. The denomination, followed by a hatched Austrian flag and the date, appears above but within the circle. Eurocoin.at.050.gif
The Austrian design features Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (with his signature), a famous Austrian composer, in reference to the idea of Austria as a "land of music". The Austrian flag is hatched below the denomination (which is against the new rules for national designs and hence will be changed at some point) on the right hand side. The year appears on the left hand side. Eurocoin.at.100.gif
The Austrian design features Bertha von Suttner, a radical Austrian pacifist and Nobel Peace Prize winner, as a symbol of Austria's efforts to support peace. The Austrian flag is hatched below the denomination (which is against the new rules for national designs and hence will be changed at some point) on the right hand side. The year appears on the left hand side. 2 Euro coin At.gif

Future changes to the national side of circulation coins

The Commission of the European Communities issued a recommendation on 19 December 2008, a common guideline for the national sides and the issuance of euro coins intended for circulation. Two sections of this recommendation stipulates that:

Article 2. Identification of the issuing Member State:
"The national sides of all denominations of the euro coins intended for circulation should bear an indication of the issuing Member State by means of the Member State’s name or an abbreviation of it."
Article 3. Absence of the currency name and denomination:
Section 1. "The national side of the euro coins intended for circulation should not repeat any indication of the denomination, or any parts thereof, of the coin, neither should it repeat the name of the single currency or of its subdivision, unless such indication stems from the use of a different alphabet."

A new design on the Austrian euro coins is expected in the near future to comply with these new guidelines, although nothing officially have been announced.[1]

Circulating Mintage quantities

The following table shows the mintage quantity for all Austrian euro coins, per denomination, per year (the numbers are represented in millions).[2]

Face Value €0.01 €0.02 €0.05 €0.10 €0.20 €0.50 €1.00 €2.00 €2.00 Comm.
2002 378.4 326.4 217.0 441.6 203.4 169.1 223.5 196.4 *
2003 10.8 118.5 108.5 0.01 50.9 9.1 0.15 4.7 *
2004 115.0 156.4 89.3 5.2 54.8 3.1 2.6 2.5 *
2005 174.7 163.2 66.1 5.2 4.1 3.1 2.6 * 6.88
2006 48.3 39.8 5.6 40.0 8.2 3.2 7.7 2.3 *
2007 111.9 72.2 52.7 81.3 45.0 3.0 41.1 * 8.905
2008 50.9 125.1 96.7 70.2 45.3 3.0 65.5 2.6 *
2009 Data not available yet

 * No coins were minted that year for that denomination

Austrian proof set

Each year the Austrian Mint issues a limited edition of its Euro coins in proof quality.

€2 commemorative coins

Other commemorative coins (Collector's coins)

Austria has a large collection of euro commemorative coins, mainly in Silver and Gold, but they also use other materials (like Niobium for example). Their face value range from 5 euro to 100 euro. This is mainly done as a legacy of old national practice of minting Gold and Silver coins. These coins are not really intended to be used as means of payment, so generally they do not circulate. Here you can find some samples:

References

External links

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