The Full Wiki

Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana
Map of Louisiana highlighting Avoyelles Parish
Location in the state of Louisiana
Map of the U.S. highlighting Louisiana
Louisiana's location in the U.S.
Seat Marksville
Largest city Marksville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

866 sq mi (2,242 km²)
832 sq mi (2,156 km²)
33 sq mi (86 km²), 3.84%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

41,481
50/sq mi (19/km²)
Founded March 31, 1807
Named for Avoyel Native Americans
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5

Avoyelles (French: Paroisse des Avoyelles) is a parish located in the U.S. state of Louisiana. The parish seat is Marksville. In 2000, its population was 41,481. The parish is named for the Avoyel Indian tribe.

Contents

History

Avoyelles Parish is known for its French-speaking history, with traditions in music and food. The area was first settled by Native Americans around 300 BC. Today on the banks of the old Mississippi River channel in Marksville, three large burial mounds, a museum and a national park commemorate their civilization. Tunicas from the Natchez tribes east of the river conquered and assimilated with the Avoyels nearly two centuries ago and are currently the largest Native American group in Avoyelles.

Spanish and African traders were probably the first foreigners to arrive in the area by 1650. In late the 18th century European families from Normandy and other parts of France, Scotland, Belgium, Italy, Germany and Spain arrived and established the towns and villages that exist today. Their direct ties to Europe set them apart from the Acadians (Cajuns) of most of southern Louisiana. Later, blacks serving under Napoleon and those loyal to France in Haiti and the French West Indies settled in Avoyelles. Arriving as refugees at the Pearl River port near Mansura, they were taken in by the Native American and European families of the area. The blending of these three cultures created a distinct Creole culture noted in the local language, food and family ties.

Today the Avoyelles Parish culture conveniently falls under the larger unbrella of "Cajun" because of the similarities in speech, food, and various folk traditions. But, it should be made clear that very little, if any, of the culture descends from the Acadian tradition. Middle and south Louisiana had been settled by both black and white francophones long before "The Grand Derangement", when the Acadians were expelled by the English from Acadia (present day Nova Scotia). The people of Avoyelles would more correctly be called "French Creoles" because they descend from those born in the French colony. "Cajuns" or "Cadjins" would also be a correct term for those of the French culture of Avoyelles. "Coonass", a popular colloquialism, is generally derogatory (though some are proud to be called such).

In 1906, V.L. Roy served as education superintendent in both Avoyelles and Lafayette parishes. In 1908, he helped with the founding of the Corn Club, later known as the Louisiana 4-H Club.[1]

Geography

The parish has a total area of 866 square miles (2,242 km²), of which, 832 square miles (2,156 km²) of it is land and 33 square miles (86 km²) of it (3.84%) is water.

Advertisements

Major highways

Adjacent parishes

National protected areas

Demographics

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 41,481 people, 14,736 households, and 10,580 families residing in the parish. The population density was 50 people per square mile (19/km²). There were 16,576 housing units at an average density of 20 per square mile (8/km²). The racial makeup of the parish was 68.47% White, 29.49% Black or African American, 1.01% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 0.66% from two or more races. 0.97% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 17.64% reported speaking French or Cajun French at home, while 2.12% speak Spanish.

Census Pop.  %±
1810 1,209
1820 2,245 85.7%
1830 3,484 55.2%
1840 6,616 89.9%
1850 9,326 41.0%
1860 13,167 41.2%
1870 12,926 −1.8%
1880 16,747 29.6%
1890 25,112 49.9%
1900 29,701 18.3%
1910 34,102 14.8%
1920 35,300 3.5%
1930 34,926 −1.1%
1940 39,256 12.4%
1950 38,031 −3.1%
1960 37,606 −1.1%
1970 37,751 0.4%
1980 41,393 9.6%
1990 39,159 −5.4%
2000 41,481 5.9%
Est. 2008 42,360 [3] 2.1%
Avoyelles Parish Census Data[4]

There were 14,736 households out of which 36.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.70% were married couples living together, 15.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.20% were non-families. 25.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the parish the population was spread out with 26.80% under the age of 18, 9.20% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 21.30% from 45 to 64, and 13.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 96.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.90 males.

The median income for a household in the parish was $23,851, and the median income for a family was $29,389. Males had a median income of $27,122 versus $18,250 for females. The per capita income for the parish was $12,146. About 21.70% of families and 25.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.50% of those under age 18 and 25.00% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

Map of Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana With Municipal Labels

Notable natives and residents

  • Eleanor Gremillion, First Resident of Marksville from 1809 - present.
  • Alcide "Blind Uncle" Gaspard, early recording artist of traditional Cajun music.
  • F.O. "Potch" Didier, flamboyant sheriff of Avoyelles Parish, 1956-1980
  • Sue Eakin, historian, author of Avoyelles Parish: Crossroads of Louisiana[5]
  • Edwin Washington Edwards, four term governor of Louisiana.
  • Elaine Schwartzenburg Edwards, first wife of Edwin Edwards and appointed U.S. Senator from August-November 1972
  • Mark Duper, Miami Dolphins wide receiver.
  • Corey Be, Popular radio DJ. Native of Moreauville and 1996 graduate of Avoyelles High School.
  • Adras LaBorde, longtime managing editor of the Alexandria Daily Town Talk
  • Raymond Laborde, mayor of Marksville (1958-1970), state representative (1972-1992), commissioner of administration (1992-1996)
  • Norma McCorvey, "Jane Roe" in the landmark Roe v. Wade lawsuit.
  • Craig Mayeux, award winning author, was born in Cottonport in 1955. His novel, Brothers Forever: An Orphan Story, was the 2008 Grand Prize Winner of the Creative Arts Council Book of the Year Award. Brothers Forever is based on the life of Mayeux's grandfather, George Leary, an Orphan Train rider who came to Cottonport in 1904.
  • Felix Eugene Moncla, Jr., United States Air Force pilot who mysteriously disappeared over Lake Superior in 1953.
  • Charles Addison Riddle III, District Attorney, 2003-current, Former State Representative, 1992-2003. Son of Charles Addison Riddle Jr., former District Attorney and Grandson of Charles Riddle, Former Representative 1932-1940.
  • Little Walter, Marion Walter Jacobs. Hamonica player. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
  • Adolph Valery Coco, Louisiana Attorney General, 1916, native of Marksville[6]
  • James A. Gremillion, Secretary of State, Louisiana, 1930s. Native of Marksville,[6]
  • Arnaud Lafargue, State Superintendent of Education, Louisiana, 1890s, native of Marksville[6]
  • Gaston Porterie, Louisiana Attorney General, 1920s, native of Mansura[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Philip Timothy, "Ex-governor [Edwin Washington Edwards tops list of colorful parish politicians""]. Alexandria Daily Town Talk, March 18, 2007. http://www.thetowntalk.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070318/COMMUNITIES/703160358. Retrieved December 19, 2009. 
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Avoyelles Parish Quickfacts". http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/22/22009.html. Retrieved 2009-09-11. 
  4. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Louisiana Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/la190090.txt. Retrieved 2008-02-02. ; Report on the Population of the United States at the Eleventh Census, 1890. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1895.
  5. ^ "Obituary of Sue Lyles Eakin". Baton Rouge Morning Advocate, September 19, 2009. http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/theadvocate/obituary.aspx?n=sue-lyles-eakins&pid=133129023. Retrieved September 21, 2009. 
  6. ^ a b c Randy DeCuir
  7. ^ Avoyelles Bicentennial of Government - Randy DeCuir

External links

Coordinates: 31°04′N 92°00′W / 31.07°N 92.00°W / 31.07; -92.00


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana
Map
File:Map of Louisiana highlighting Avoyelles Parish.png
Location in the state of Louisiana
Map of the USA highlighting Louisiana
Louisiana's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded March 31, 1807
Seat Marksville
Largest City Marksville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 3.84%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

41481
Time zone Central : UTC-6/-5
Named for: Avoyel Native Americans

Avoyelles (French: Paroisse des Avoyelles) is a parish located in the U.S. state of Louisiana. The parish seat is Marksville. In 2000, its population was 41,481. The parish is named for the Avoyel Indian tribe.

Contents

Geography

The parish has a total area of 2,242 km² (866 sq mi). 2,156 km² (832 sq mi) of it is land and 86 km² (33 sq mi) of it (3.84%) is water.

Major Highways

Adjacent parishes

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 41,481 people, 14,736 households, and 10,580 families residing in the parish. The population density was 19/km² (50/sq mi). There were 16,576 housing units at an average density of 8/km² (20/sq mi). The racial makeup of the parish was 68.47% White, 29.49% Black or African American, 1.01% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 0.66% from two or more races. 0.97% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 17.64% reported speaking French or Cajun French at home, while 2.12% speak Spanish.

There were 14,736 households out of which 36.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.70% were married couples living together, 15.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.20% were non-families. 25.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the parish the population was spread out with 26.80% under the age of 18, 9.20% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 21.30% from 45 to 64, and 13.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 96.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.90 males.

The median income for a household in the parish was $23,851, and the median income for a family was $29,389. Males had a median income of $27,122 versus $18,250 for females. The per capita income for the parish was $12,146. About 21.70% of families and 25.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.50% of those under age 18 and 25.00% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

Map of Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana With Municipal Labels

Culture

Avoyelles Parish is known for its Cajun, French-speaking history, with rich traditions in music and food. The area was first settled by Native Americans around 300 B.C. Today on the banks of the old Mississippi River channel in Marksville, three large burial mounds, a museum and a national park commemorate their civilization. Tunicas from the Natchez tribes east of the river conquered and assimilated with the Avoyels nearly two centuries ago and are currently the largest Native American group in Avoyelles.

Spanish and African traders were probably the first foreigners to arrive in the area by 1650. In late the 18th century European families from Normandy and other parts of France, Scotland, Belgium, Italy, Germany and Spain arrived and established the towns and villages that exist today. Their direct ties to Europe set them apart from the Acadians (Cajuns) of most of southern Louisiana. Later, blacks serving under Napoleon and those loyal to France in Haiti and the French West Indies settled in Avoyelles. Arriving as refugees at the Pearl River port near Mansura, they were taken in by the Native American and European families of the area. The blending of these three cultures created a distinct Creole culture noted in the local language, food and family ties.

Famous people from Avoyelles

Coordinates: 31°04′N 92°00′W / 31.07, -92.00


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Avoyelles Parish, LouisianaRDF feed
County names Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana  +
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Louisiana  +
Short name Avoyelles Parish  +

This article uses material from the "Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message