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County of Ayr
until circa 1890
AyrshireTraditional.png
Geography
Area
- Total
Ranked 7th
728,186 acres (2947 km²)
County town Ayr
Chapman code AYR

Ayrshire (Scots: Coontie o Ayrshire; Scottish Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Àir, pronounced [ʃir̴əxɡ̊ iɲiɾʲˈaːɾʲ]) is a registration county, and former administrative county in south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. Its principal towns include Ayr, Kilmarnock and Irvine. The town of Troon on the coast has hosted the British Open Golf Championship twice in the last seven years and eight times in total. Approximately 200,000 visitors came to Troon during the 2004 Open.[citation needed] It was the members of Prestwick Golf Club who first created the British Open Championship in 1860[1] with the club hosting the event twenty-four times up until 1925.

Ayrshire, under the name the County of Ayr, is a registration county. The electoral and valuation area named Ayrshire covers the three council areas of South Ayrshire, East Ayrshire and North Ayrshire, therefore including the Isle of Arran, Great Cumbrae and Little Cumbrae. The three islands were part of the County of Bute until 1975 and are not always included when the term Ayrshire is applied to the region. The same area is known as Ayrshire and Arran in other contexts.

Ayrshire is one of the most agriculturally fertile regions of Scotland. Potatoes are grown in fields near the coast, using seaweed-based fertiliser, and in addition the region produces pork products, other root vegetables, cattle (see below) and summer berries such as strawberries are grown abundantly.

Ayrshire shares with Dumfries and Galloway some wonderful rugged hill country known as the Galloway Hills. These hill lie to the west of the A713 (Ayr to Castle Douglas road) and they run south from the Loch Doon area almost to the Solway Firth. To the east of this route through the hills lie the Carsphairn and Scaur Hills which lie to the south east of Dalmellington and south of New Cumnock. Glen Afton runs deep into these hills.

The area used to be heavily industrialised, with steel making, coal mining and in Kilmarnock numerous examples of production-line manufacturing, most famously Johnnie Walker whisky. In more recent history, Digital Equipment had a large manufacturing plant near Ayr from about 1976 until the company was taken over by Compaq in 1998. Some supplier companies grew up to service this site and the more distant IBM plant at Greenock in Renfrewshire. Scotland's aviation industry has long been based in and around Prestwick and its international airport, and although aircraft manufacture ceased at the former British Aerospace plant in 1998, a significant number of aviation companies are still based on the Prestwick site. However, unemployment in the region (excluding the more rural South Ayrshire) remains high, above the national average.

The area became part of the kingdom of Scotland during the 11th century. In 1263, the Scots successfully drove off of the Norwegian leidang-army in a skirmish known as the Battle of Largs.

A notable historic building in Ayrshire is Turnberry Castle, which dates from the 13th century or earlier, and which may have been the birthplace of Robert the Bruce.

The historic shire or sheriffdom of Ayr was divided into three districts or bailieries which later made up the county of Ayrshire. The three districts were:

The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1889 established a uniform system of county councils in Scotland and realigned the boundaries of many of Scotland’s counties.

Glasgow Prestwick International Airport, serving Glasgow, is located in Ayrshire. It has a niche in rock history as the only place in Britain visited by Elvis Presley, on his way home from Army service in Germany in 1960.

Contents

History

"Welcome to Ayrshire" sign on M77 southbound
Administrative subdivisions covering Ayrshire

The origins of the name Ayrshire come from the 12th century A.D. when the Scottish alphabet did not include the letter 'L'. For this reason the spelling had to be changed in order for it make sense in a written context. However the oral traditions have remained from the Gramian region of Scotland and confirm the correct pronunciation is actually 'Aleshire'. It was believed at this early stage in the language that the 'yr' between the 'A' and the 'Shire' was the best way in which to navigate this problem and hence this is the reason for the spelling today.

Ayr county council was created in 1890, under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1889. In 1930 the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1929 was implemented. This re-designated the Burghs into large burghs and Small Burghs. This new categorisation influenced the level of autonomy that the Burghs enjoyed from the county council. The act also abolished the parish as a unit of local government in Scotland. In Ayrshire in excess of 30 parishes were consolidated into ten district councils.

In May 1975 the county council was abolished and its functions transferred to Strathclyde Regional Council. The county area was divided between four new districts within the two-tier Strathclyde region: Cumnock and Doon Valley, Cunninghame, Kilmarnock and Loudoun and Kyle and Carrick. The Cunninghame district included the Isle of Arran, Great Cumbrae and Little Cumbrae, which had until then been administered as part of the County of Bute.

In 1996 the two-tier system of regions and districts was abolished and Ayrshire was divided between the unitary council areas of East Ayrshire (covering the area of the former Kilmarnock & Loudon District and Cumnock & Doon Valley District), North Ayrshire (covering the area of the former Cunninghame District Council) and South Ayrshire (covering the area of the former Kyle and Carrick District).

Parliamentary constituencies

There was an Ayrshire constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1708 to 1801 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 until 1868, when the constituency was divided into Ayrshire North and Ayrshire South.

During the whole of the 1708 to 1868 period, and until 1950, the burghs of Ayr and Irvine were parliamentary burghs, represented as components of Ayr Burghs. In 1832 Kilmarnock became a parliamentary burgh, to be represented as a component of Kilmarnock Burghs until 1918. Ayr Burghs and Kilmarnock Burghs were districts of burghs, and quite different in character from later Ayr and Kilmarnock constituencies.

From 1918 to 1983 Ayrshire and Buteshire were treated as if a single area for purposes of parliamentary representation, with their combined area being divided into different constituencies at different times. Scottish local government counties were abolished in 1975, in favour of regions and districts, but the next reform of constituency boundaries was not until 1983.

Constituencies covering Ayrshire may be listed by periods as below, but the story is somewhat more complicated than the lists may imply: until 1918, Ayr Burghs and Kilmarnock Burghs included burghs lying outside both Ayrshire and Buteshire; a particular constituency name may represent different boundaries in different periods; in 1974, there were boundary changes without the creation of any new constituency names.

Period Constituencies
1708 to 1832 Ayrshire and Ayr Burghs
1832 to 1868 Ayrshire, Kilmarnock Burghs and Ayr Burghs
1868 to 1918 North Ayrshire, Kilmarnock Burghs, Ayr Burghs and South Ayrshire
1918 to 1950 Bute and Northern Ayrshire, Kilmarnock, Ayr Burghs and South Ayrshire
1950 to 1983 Bute and Northern Ayrshire, Central Ayrshire, Kilmarnock, Ayr and South Ayrshire

Towns and villages in Ayrshire

Ayrshire, with rivers and several towns.

Rivers in Ayrshire

The main rivers flowing to the Clyde coast are, from north to south, the following:

Interesting places

Some notable people born in Ayrshire

References

  1. ^ http://www.intayrnet.com/jindex.html?prestwick/index.html
  2. ^ a b c d Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963. 
  3. ^ Euan Robson, George Houston: Nature's Limner (Atelier Books: Edinburgh, 1997).

External links

Coordinates: 55°30′N 4°30′W / 55.5°N 4.5°W / 55.5; -4.5

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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Ayrshire is a region in the southwest of Scotland. It incorporates South Ayrshire, East Ayrshire and North Ayrshire.

Map of Ayrshire
Map of Ayrshire

Understand

Ayrshire is a largely rural area incorporating a number of small towns. The primary attractions for tourists are walks and cycling routes, coupled with castles and other historic sites. Ayrshire's history as a tourist destination stems from its proximity to Glasgow and at one time the coastal towns functioned as resorts for those wishing to holiday during the summer. The large growth in air travel towards the end of the twentieth century has largely put an end to this; however tourists still visit the area to take in the scenery which, though qualitatively different from that of the Scottish Highlands, remains visually appealing.

Talk

As with the rest of the UK, English is spoken, but proficiency in foreign languages is very rare. At best you may encounter someone with a grasp of French, but this is to be regarded as an exception.

Get in

By Plane

Ayrshire is served by Glasgow Prestwick International Airport (PIK), which is primarily a destination for a number of low-cost airlines. Prestwick airport can be reached directly from European cities including Brussels, Dublin, Frankfurt, London, Milan, Oslo, Paris, Rome and Stockholm. The airport has its own railway station, with direct links to Glasgow Central Station (a 45 minute journey) and to Ayr (7 minutes). See below for further information. Ryanair passengers can get a discount by showing their flight paperwork to the ticket inspector when you purchase a ticket on the train.

  • Glasgow Prestwick International Airport [1] - Airport information and live flight times.
  • Ryanair [2] - Online ticket sales for flights to/from over 15 European cities.

By Bus and Train

The towns of Ayrshire are connected by frequent bus and train services from Glasgow. The train is usually the most popular and quickest option in this regard, though bus services can occasionally be cheaper. Additionally, trains travelling on the western rail route from England to Scotland make stops in several towns in Ayrshire such as Kilmarnock.

Get around

Public transport services are extensive, if occasionally overpriced. All but the smallest villages are connected by rail and virtually all areas have some form of bus service. Nevertheless, most tourists opt to visit a number of small towns and attractions by car. As the distances between attractions is often not very large, cycling can also be a good option.

  • The Isle of Arran is a popular destination and can be reached by ferry from the town of Ardrossan. The island provides the opportunity for hiking through the glacial valley of Glen Rosa and the climbing of Goat Fell, the highest peak on the island. Arran has successfully been marketed as 'Scotland in Miniature' due to the quaint nature of its settlements.
  • Alloway contains a number of attractions related to the poet Robert Burns, who was born in the town. The thatched cottage in which he was born and the Church and Bridge (Brig O'Doon) which feature in the poem 'Tam O'Shanter' can all be visited, in addition to a museum celebrating the poet's works. Alloway is located a short distance from the larger town of Ayr.
  • Culzean Castle and its country park constitute one of southern Scotland's most visited attractions. The castle is easily reached by bus from Ayr (a distance of 12 miles) and provides historic attractions combined with attractive views of the Ayrshire coast.
  • Golf, as in most areas of Scotland, is well provided for in the Ayrshire area. Along with a myriad of public courses, Ayrshire contains two courses which have held the British Open (one of the majors on the PGA/European tour) in recent years: Turnberry and Royal Troon. In 2007, Golf Digest ranked Turnberry as the 7th best golf course in its list of the "100 Best Golf Courses Outside the United States" and the course is available to the general public from between £65 to £200 a round, depending on the time of year. Royal Troon is also available for visitors to play between May and October and will cost around £200. In addition, Prestwick Golf Club, host of the first British Open (and consequently the first major golf tournament) can be accessed by the general public, though the course is not quite of the same standard as Turnberry and Troon.
  • Cycling is very popular in the summer throughout Ayrshire. A common cycle route is between the towns of Ayr and Girvan, which provides pleasant views of the Ayrshire coastline, the castle at Dunure and Culzean.
  • Braidwoods Restaurant in Dalry has the distinction of one Michelin star and serves high quality cuisine, with a particular emphasis on seafood. A 3 course meal is available for £36.
  • The Sorn Inn in the town of Sorn, represents another high quality restaurant which, though not possessing a Michelin star, has been awarded a distinction in Michelin guides since 2006. The restaurant serves a variety of Italian, French and Scottish cuisine using local produce.

Drink

Virtually all towns have some form of pub in this area of the world and visiting one can give the traveller an interesting perspective on the local culture. Nightlife on the whole however, is not one of Ayrshire's strong points. There are a few nightclubs in larger towns, but the experience is liable to be a disappointing one in comparison to the larger venues in Glasgow and Edinburgh.

Stay safe

Due to the rural nature of much of Ayrshire it is unlikely you will encounter any crime if you stick to regular tourist activities. Nevertheless, if in the centre of one of the larger towns such as Kilmarnock, there is the potential to encounter drunken or otherwise undesirable individuals, particularly on a Friday or Saturday night. With this said, it is exceptionally rare that a tourist visiting the area will be the victim of crime.

Get out

To the North, Glasgow offers all the attractions of a large city and may act as a gateway to the Scottish Highlands or Edinburgh and the East coast. To the South, there are a number of coastal towns such as Portpatrick which offer a similar experience to that of the Ayrshire coast. Ireland may also be reached from Stranraer and trains run from Kilmarnock to Carlisle and England.


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Database error article)

From LoveToKnow 1911

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Noun

Ayrshire

  1. A traditional county in Scotland.
  2. One of a superior breed of cattle from Ayrshire, Scotland, notable for the quantity and quality of their milk.

Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
For the cattle originating from Ayrshire, see Ayrshire Cattle.
County of Ayr
File:AyrshireTraditional.png
Geography
Area
- Total
Ranked 7th
728,186 acres (2947 km²)
County town Ayr
Chapman code AYR


Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir in Scottish Gaelic) is a region of south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. Its principal towns include Ayr, Kilmarnock and the new town (and ancient royal burgh) of Irvine. The town of Troon (pop. 20,000) on the coast has hosted the British Open Golf Championship twice in the last seven years, eight times in total, including the most recent one in 2004. Approximately 200,000 visitors come to Troon during this period.

Ayrshire, under the name the County of Ayr, is a registration county. The electoral and valuation area named Ayrshire covers the three council areas of South Ayrshire, East Ayrshire and North Ayrshire, therefore including the Isle of Arran, Great Cumbrae and Little Cumbrae. The three islands were part of the County of Bute until 1975 and are not always included when the term Ayrshire is applied to the region. The same area is known as Ayrshire and Arran in other contexts.

Ayrshire is one of the most agriculturally fertile regions of Scotland. Potatoes are grown in fields near the coast, using seaweed-based fertiliser, and in addition the region produces pork products, other root vegetables, cattle (see below) and summer berries such as strawberries are grown abundantly.

The area used to be heavily industrialised, with steel making, coal mining and in Kilmarnock numerous examples of production-line manufacturing, most famously Johnnie Walker whisky. In more recent history, Digital Equipment had a large manufacturing plant near Ayr from about 1976 until the company was taken over by Compaq in 1998. Some supplier companies grew up to service this site and the more distant IBM plant at Greenock in Renfrewshire. Scotland's aviation industry has long been based in and around Prestwick and its international airport, and although aircraft manufacture ceased at the former British Aerospace plant in 1998, a significant number of aviation companies are still based on the Prestwick site. However, unemployment in the region(excluding the more rural South Ayrshire) remains high, above the national average.

The area became part of the kingdom of Scotland during the 11th century. In 1263, the Scots successfully drove off a group of Norwegian Vikings in a skirmish known as the Battle of Largs.

A notable historic building in Ayrshire is Turnberry Castle, which dates from the 13th century or earlier, and which may have been the birthplace of Robert the Bruce.

The historic shire or sheriffdom of Ayr was divided into three districts or bailieries which later made up the county of Ayrshire. The three districts were:

The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1889 established a uniform system of county councils in Scotland and realigned the boundaries of many of Scotland’s counties.

Glasgow Prestwick International Airport, serving Glasgow, is located in Ayrshire. It has a niche in rock history as the only place in Britain visited by Elvis Presley, on his way home from Army service in Germany in 1960.

Contents

Local government

File:M77-Ayrshire.jpg

File:MapOfAyrshire.png

See also Local government of Scotland

Ayrshire county council was created in 1890, under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1889. In 1930 three districts were formed within the county, under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1929, to administer functions previously the responsibility of parish councils: the districts of Carrick, Cunninghame and Kyle.

In 1975 the county council was abolished and the county area was divided between four new districts within the two-tier Strathclyde region: Cumnock and Doon Valley, Cunninghame, Kilmarnock and Loudoun and Kyle and Carrick. The Cunninghame district was larger than the pre-1975 district: it included the Isle of Arran, Great Cumbrae and Little Cumbrae, which had been administered previously as part of the County of Bute.

In 1996 the two-tier system of regions and districts was abolished and Ayrshire was divided between the unitary council areas of East Ayrshire, South Ayrshire, and North Ayrshire. North Ayrshire includes the Isle of Arran, and the Cumbrae islands.

Parliamentary constituencies

There was an Ayrshire constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1708 to 1801 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 until 1868, when the constituency was divided into Ayrshire North and Ayshire South.

During the whole of the 1708 to 1868 period, and until 1950, the burghs of Ayr and Irvine were parliamentary burghs, represented as components of Ayr Burghs. In 1832 Kilmarnock became a parliamentary burgh, to be represented as a component of Kilmarnock Burghs until 1918. Ayr Burghs and Kilmarnock Burghs were districts of burghs, and quite different in character from later Ayr and Kilmarnock constituencies.

From 1918 to 1983 Ayrshire and Buteshire were treated as if a single area for purposes of parliamentary representation, with their combined area being divided into different constituencies at different times. Scottish local government counties were abolished in 1975, in favour of regions and districts, but the next reform of constituency boundaries was not until 1983.

Constituencies covering Ayrshire may be listed by periods as below, but the story is somewhat more complicated than the lists may imply: until 1918, Ayr Burghs and Kilmarnock Burghs included burghs lying outside both Ayrshire and Buteshire; a particular constituency name may represent different boundaries in different periods; in 1974, there were boundary changes without the creation of any new constituency names.

Period Constituencies
1708 to 1832 Ayrshire and Ayr Burghs
1832 to 1868 Ayrshire, Kilmarnock Burghs and Ayr Burghs
1868 to 1918 North Ayrshire, Kilmarnock Burghs, Ayr Burghs and South Ayrshire
1918 to 1950 Bute and Northern Ayrshire, Kilmarnock, Ayr Burghs and South Ayrshire
1950 to 1983 Bute and Northern Ayrshire, Central Ayrshire, Kilmarnock, Ayr and South Ayrshire

Towns and villages in Ayrshire

Rivers in Ayrshire

The main rivers flowing to the Clyde coast are, from north to south, the following:

Interesting places

Some notable people born in Ayrshire

References

    1. ^ a b c d (1963) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 

External links


CoordinatesImage:Wp_globe_tiny.gif: 55°30′N, 4°30′WLatitude: 55°30′0″N
Longitude: 4°30′0″W


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Ayrshire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about AyrshireRDF feed
Chapmancode AYR  +
Coord 55°30′0″N, 4°30′0″W  +info.pngGoogle Earth
Coord possibly 55°30′N; 4°30′W  +
County of country United Kingdom  +
County of subdivision1 Scotland  +
Short name Ayr  +

This article uses material from the "Ayrshire" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

[[File:|right|thumb|Ayrshire]] Ayrshire is a county on the west coast of Scotland. The county town is Ayr but the biggest towns are Kilmarnock and Irvine.

There used to be three districts called "bailieries" which were later put together to make up the shire of Ayrshire. The three districts were:

  • Cunninghame in the north (which included the royal burgh of Irvine)
  • Kyle in the middle (which included the royal burgh of Ayr)
  • Carrick in the south.

For local government, the county is divided into three council areas:

Towns and villages in Ayrshire

The towns in Ayrshire are:

  • Ardrossan
  • Auchentiber
  • Auchinleck
  • Ayr
  • Beith
  • Catrine
  • Cumnock
  • Dalry
  • Darvel
  • Drongan
  • Drybridge
  • Dunlop
  • Dunure
  • Fairlie
  • Fenwick
  • Galston
  • Gatehead, Ayrshire
  • Girvan
  • Glengarnock
  • Hurlford
  • Irvine
  • Kilbirnie
  • Kilmarnock
  • Kilmaurs
  • Kilwinning
  • Knockentiber
  • Largs
  • Logan
  • Lugton
  • Lugar
  • Mauchline
  • Maybole
  • Muirkirk
  • Newmilns
  • Ochiltree
  • Prestwick
  • Saltcoats
  • Seamill
  • Skelmorlie
  • Sorn
  • Springside
  • Stevenston
  • Stewarton
  • Turnberry
  • Troon
  • West Kilbride


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