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Azcapotzalco
—  Delegación  —
Azcapotzalco within the Federal District
Coordinates: 19°28′13″N 99°10′28″W / 19.47028°N 99.17444°W / 19.47028; -99.17444
Country Mexico
Federal entity D.F.
Established 1928
Named for Ancient Tepanec city
Seat Av. Castilla Oriente s/n esq. 22 de Febrero
Government
 - Jefe delegacional Alejandro Carbajal González (PRD)
Area [1]
 - Total 33.6 km2 (13 sq mi)
Population [1]
 - Total 425,298
 - Density 12,657.7/km2 (32,783.2/sq mi)
Time zone Central Standard Time (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) Central Daylight Time (UTC-5)
Postal codes 02000-02990
Area code(s) 55
Website http://www.azcapotzalco.gob.mx/

Azcapotzalco (Classical Nahuatl: Āzcapotzalco [aːskapoˈtsaɬko], from Nahuatl Azcalli ant; Potzulli anthill; co place; literally, "In the place of the ant hills") is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexico's Federal District is divided. Azcapotzalco is in the northwestern part of Mexico City. It was a town of its own until it was swallowed up by the burgeoning conurbation of Mexico City.

Today, Azcapotzalco is divided into many colonias (neighborhoods), including Nueva Santa María, Clavería, San Rafael, El Rosario, Villas de Azcapotzalco, El Recreo, Pro-Hogar, Obrero Popular and Santa Cruz Acayucan.

Contents

History

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Spanish Influence

17th century glyph to denote Azcapotzalco

Much of the Spanish Colonial Style architecture is still in use in Azcapotzalco; of particular note is the Church of St. James and St. Philip, with its chapel of the Virgin of Rosario and the associated Dominican monastery.

The chapel contains the following altarpieces:

  • The Santa Ana altarpieces, signed by Juan Correa (17th century)
  • The San Jose altarpiece.
  • The Virgin of Guadalupe altarpiece, and
  • The central altarpiece dedicated to the Virgen del Rosario.

The chapel of the Virgin of Rosario often is compared to the chapels of Puebla and Oaxaca as the best examples of Spanish colonial church architecture and decoration.

The Porfirian era

Between 1881-1882, president Manuel Gonzalez intensified a colonization project all over the country. He brought thousands of Italians to the country and in the Colonia Aldana he colonized it with northern Italians, mainly from Lombardy, Tirol , and Piedmont. It was one of the most prosperous colonies in the country, but in the early 1900s the urbananization growth of Mexico City reached the colony and absorbed it. Today some families still retain their Italian identity with restaurants and bakeries. This could be considered Mexico City's Little Italy. The Italian district in Mexico City. Between 1910 and 1920, Mexico City's character was largely influenced by President Porfirio Díaz. During this period, several of the city's suburbs were known by different names, for example: The American Suburb (now Zona Rosa), Centro Suburb (now Historic Centre), Roma Suburb (Colonia Roma), Chapultepec Forest Area (now Bosque de Chapultepec and Lomas de Chapultepec), San Ángel (now San Angel Inn), Hacienda de los Morales (now Polanco (Mexico)) and Azcapotzalco (now Azcapotzalco) were considered glamorous and luxurious areas.

On Azcapotzalco Avenue, elegant Beaux-Arts architecture houses were built, and a very European atmosphere existed (still present to some extent today). President Díaz enjoyed visiting the suburb because, as he would say, "Azcapotzalco is the place where I have a still day". During this period, Azcapotzalco was known as Porfirio Díaz's Azcapotzalco.

Modern day

Azcapotzalco
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
9
 
23
5
 
 
8
 
25
6
 
 
11
 
28
9
 
 
31
 
28
11
 
 
61
 
28
12
 
 
148
 
26
13
 
 
166
 
25
12
 
 
160
 
25
12
 
 
114
 
24
12
 
 
63
 
24
11
 
 
7
 
24
8
 
 
7
 
23
6
average max. and min. temperatures in °C
precipitation totals in mm
source: [1]

Azcapotzalco changed dramatically in the 20th century; urban sprawl led many of Mexico City's suburbs to become absorbed into the city.

References

External links


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