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This is an alphabetical list of the basso profondo, bass, bass-baritone and tenor soloists who have performed with the Alexandrov Ensemble (under its various titles) since its establishment in 1928. It is difficult to differentiate between regular and guest soloists, since many have alternated between the one category and the other during their careers, so they are all listed together. Soloists of whom no recordings have yet been found have been listed below as "other soloists".

Contents

Introduction

Until April 2009, when this article was created, little or nothing was generally known outside Russia about these fine soloists: as a group, or (in most cases) as individuals. People in the West could read a few of their names on current Alexandrov Ensemble CDs and DVDs, and perhaps hear a few old 78rpm recordings on YouTube, but could not Google in English for their images or musical biographies. Since April 2009, to a certain extent, they can. Therefore this article is part of the soloists' history.

In 2004 Max Loppert said of Georgy Vinogradov: "How is it possible for any singer of this caliber to have been (outside Russia) this unknown?"[1]. One could say the same of the whole group. Before April 2009, almost all online resources on this subject were in Russian and Japanese, and even these were limited in content, so far as the biographies of most soloists were concerned. The dearth of information in the West could be partly attributable to the language barrier and the Cold War. One could speculate that scandals such as those 1951 rumours surrounding Vinogradov could have pressured the Alexandrov Ensemble to exercise particular discretion regarding publicity of their valuable star turns.

Even so, there is almost no online information about the tenor Victor Nikitin, who made a beautiful 78 rpm recording of Cold Waves Lapping in the 1940s, and his last traceable recording appears to have been made in 1951, the same year as the rumours of a bar-room brawl and the end of Georgy Vinogradov's career [2]. One can draw no conclusions, but - outside Russia at least - an air of mystery surrounds some of these great singers.

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Status of soloists

Apart from guest soloists, there are two ways of contracting a soloist in the Alexandrov Ensemble:

  • A soloist of the choir is a constant member of the choir and only sometimes has one or two solo performances with certain songs specially selected for their personal vocal capabilities.
  • Soloist of the Ensemble is a higher grade, meaning that the singer is a soloist on a constant basis and never - or no longer - takes part in the choir.[3]

A to Z list of soloists

Georgi Abramov

See image here and here. (b.Moscow 12 April 1903; d.Georgia 1 November 1966). (Russian: Георгий Абрамов). Bass soloist. Honoured Artist of Russia (1944). From 1918 to 1928 he worked as a mechanic or plumber in Moscow State University. In 1930 he entered an operatic singing competition on All-Union Radio. As a result of this, from 1931 to 1966 he was soloist of the All-Union Radio and Television, taking part in opera productions. He was a concert singer, promoting the works of Soviet composers, and became the definitive singer of songs such as Roads, Novikova, Treasured Stone, Single Accordion, Mokrousov, and especially Bryansk Forest (by Katz) [4]. From 1954 to 1958 he was a music teacher at Gnessin State Musical College. He toured in Poland, Hungary, Romania and East Germany [5].[6]

With Georgy Vinogradov and Vladimir Zakharov he recorded For those who are in Transit (S. Katz - A. Fatyanov), and the beautiful folksong Already as the Sea [7]. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded A Bryansk Forest (recorded 1948) for the All-Union Radio Committee.

Nicolai A. Abramov

(Russian: Николай А. Абрамов), tenor soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded: Smuglyanka duet with Nikolay Savchuk (music: Novikov; lyrics: Ya Shvedov), unknown duet with A. Kusleev, Praying, unknown duet with L.M. Kharitonov, Here's the Deal (1963), Black Crow duet with A. Eisen (1956), Nut Brown Maiden duet with I. Savchuk (1953, 1956) [8], The Little Bells (1956) [9] [10]. Unfortunately, Nicolai Abramov's name was frequently incorrectly attributed on recordings, notably on the Kultur video of 1965 that is available in the West.[11]

Vadim Petrovich Ananyev

See image here. Current soloist in the Ensemble.

Georgy Yakovlevich Andryushchenko

(b. Aravan, Kyrgyzstan, 1933) [12]. (Russian: Георгий Яковлевич Андрющенко); also spelled "Andryushenko"; tenor soloist of the Bolshoi Theatre, People's Artist of Russia (1973). He studied at Gnessin State Musical College, and joined the Alexandrov Ensemble as a soloist in 1958 [13]. He sang Prince Andrei Khovansky in Modest Mussorgsky's opera Khovanshchina (1979) [14] [15]. Performed at the Bolshoi Theatre 1963-1979 [16], had a wide repertoire and was one of the leading tenors in a troupe which toured the world [17].

Valentin Ivanovich Anisimov

See image here. (b.1937; d.26 August 2002). (Russian: В.И. Анисимов), bass soloist (of the Odessa Opera House). People's Artist of Ukraine and Honoured Artist of Russia (1973). In 1962 he graduated from the Urals State Conservatory. From 1962 he was a soloist at Sverdlovsk, Ukraine and from 1967 at the Odessa Opera and Ballet Theatre. He gave 40 performances at the Bolshoi Theatre and gained a fine reputation throughout the USSR for singing in Verdi's opera Rigoletto. From 1980 he was soloist of the Moscow Philharmonic. He also taught at the Institute of Contemporary Art in the USSR [18]. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Veterans (music: Boris Alexandrov; lyrics S. Bencken).

Georgiy I. Babaev

(Russian: Г.И. Бабаев; also translated George Babayev), tenor soloist, Stalin Prize Laureate. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Song of the Young Soldiers duet with V. Puchkov (music: P. Akulenko; lyrics: Ya Shvedov), Song of the Klim Voroshilov duet with Yuri Louth (music: Alexander Alexandrov; lyrics: O. Kolychev), Aside Native (music: A. Alexandrov; lyrics: S. Mikhalkov), Seasoned Cook (music: Z. Компанеец; lyrics: I. Lakshin), Song of the Bluhera duet with V. Pankov (music: Alexander Alexandrov; lyrics: S. Alymov), I Myself (Slovak song).

Belyaev (ca.1950) [19].

Evgeny Belyaev

Soloist of the Ensemble. (Russian: Евгений Михайлович Беляев). Outside the USSR, one of the most celebrated tenor soloists under Boris Alexandrov was Evgeny Belyaev or Evgeny Mikhailovich Belyaev (1926-1994) [20]. He was born September 11 1926 in the Bryansk Oblast, and served in the subdivision of zenith troops during World War II. He then graduated from Gnessin State Musical College. In 1947 he was a soloist of the Ensemble of Song and Dance of the Carpathian military district, and in 1952 a Member of CPSU (Communist Party of the Soviet Union). In 1955 he was a soloist of the Ensemble of Song and Dance of the Soviet Army of Alexandrov. In 1967 he was made People's Artist of the USSR, and in 1978 he won the State Prize of the USSR. He died in 1994 (February 21 or 22nd).

Two of his most famous performances are Oh the Rye and Nightingale. The lyric of Nightingale asks the nightingale to be quiet as the soldiers are sleeping; i.e. they have died. One of his most popular recordings with The Alexandrov Ensemble is Kalinka [21] [22].

Pyotr Dmitrievich Bogachev

(Russian: Петр Дмитриевич Богачёв), bass-baritone soloist. Honoured Artist of Russia. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded In the Ocean Gave duet with S. Ivanov (music: B. Korostylev; lyrics: B. Bezhaev), It's a Long Time Since We Were Home duet with S. Ivanov (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: A. Fatyanov), We, the Army People duet with S. Ivanov (music: G. Movsesyan; lyrics: Robert Rozhdestvensky), Listen, Beauty duet with S. Ivanov (music: E. Martin; lyrics: M. Plyatskovsky), Your Soldiers duet with S. Ivanov (music: B. Gamal; lyrics: A. Sofronov), We go, We Go Into the Army duet with Ivan Bukreev (music: B. Aleksandrov; lyrics: V. Tatarinov), Smuglianka, duet with S. Ivanov (music: A. Novikov; lyrics: Y. Chvedov),The Samovars duet with S. Ivanov (music A. Novikov; lyrics: S. Alimov) (1982/92) [23], Nut Brown Girl duet with S. Ivanov (1989/92, 2003), Endless Sea duet with S. Ivanov, We Protect the Country duet with S. Ivanov, Afield duet with S. Ivanov (1992), Evening on the Roads duet with S. Ivanov (1992), Distant Northern Town trio with V.S. Buzurov and S. Ivanov (1992), Dixie duet with S. Ivanov 1992, Greetings from the Troops duet with S. Ivanov, Our Army duet with S. Ivanov (1984) [24].

Ivan Bukreev

Ivan Semionovich Bukreev

Soloist of the Ensemble. (b.1924; d.1998). (Russian: Иван Семенович Букреев), lyric tenor soloist, People's Artist of the USSR, People's Artist of Russia [25] . In World War II he was in the Air Force, and was seriously wounded in battle. In 1944 he graduated from the Gnessin State Musical College, and became a soloist in the Air Force ensemble. It has been suggested in the West that he was overshadowed by E. Belyaev, but Leonid Mikhailovich Kharitonov remembers the following:

"Bukreev didn’t have any specific reaction to Belyaev’s success. Actually, he was glad for his colleague. Besides, it would be quite strange to compare them since they were different kinds of tenor – Belyaev was lyric tenor (higher voice) and Bukreev was a lyric and dramatic[26] tenor (deeper voice). Bukreev never performed as a soloist abroad. Belyaev sang only three songs abroad and was mainly famous for the Kalinka song. In Russia they had equal popularity. Bukreev was teetotal and was a good husband and father to his wife and daughter."

Kharitonov only ever sang duets with one person, and that was Bukreev. With the Alexandrov Ensemble from 1953 to 1987/88 Bukreev gained a high reputation and recorded: Take Soldiers (music: Y. Milutin; lyrics: M. Lisyansky), Submariners' Waltz (music: V. Alexandrov; lyrics: Igor Morozov) (1965), Rides the Border (music: B. Muradeli; lyrics: A. Annual), We Go, We Go Into the Army duet with P. Bogachev (music: B. Aleksandrov; lyrics: V. Tatarinov), The Soldier (music: B. Mokrousov; lyrics: C. Islands), Our Soldiers (music: L. Lyadov; lyrics: A. Zharov), Good Guy (music: A. Doluhanyan; lyrics: Nekrasova L.), Song of Prague (music: M. Blanter; lyrics: Anon) (1960), At Least (music: A. Doluhanyan; lyrics: M. Lisyansky), A Wave (music: A Doluhanyan; lyrics: M. Lisyansky), Soldier's Ways duet with Edward Labkovsky (music: B. Aleksandrov; lyrics: B. Dubrovin), Russian Accordion (music: B. Muradeli; lyrics: E. Savinov), I Took You into the Tundra (music: M. Fradkin; lyrics: M. Plyatskovsky) (performed 1982 [27]), Bird Cherry (music: M. Blanter; lyrics: M. Isakovsky), South-West Region (music: Yu Milyutin; lyrics: E. Dolmatovskaya), I Will Never Forget You (music: E. Kolmanovsky; lyrics: K. Vanshenkin) (ca.1965), Moscow Nights (music: V. Soloviev-Sedoi; lyrics: M. Matousovski) (1958), Bella Ciao duet with P. Slastnoi (Italian partisan song; arr. B. Pogrebov) (ca.1966) [28], Bucharest Love, Homeland Night, Wait a Day to Return (1956), Song of the Border Defence Troops, two unknown solos, Spring of 1945 duet with Boris Shemyakov, Sky Blue Eyes (1978), Near the Garden trio with I.I. Savchuk and E. Belyaev, American Soldiers, That Soldier Heads Up, Far Away (1978), The Girls I Cry, Early Apple Blossom, Regiment Polka duet with V.P. Gorlanov, Ready Rocket Forces duet with V.L. Ruslanov, City of Rostov, In Our Company, Vasya-Vasilyok duet with L.M. Kharitonov (ca.1965), I'll Always be a Soldier. [29]

Vladimir Bunchikov

Vladimir Abramovich Bunchikov

Bass-baritone soloist. (b.Yekaterinoslav 21 November 1902; d.17 March 1995). Honoured Artist of Russia (1944).In Simferopol he was a scenery operator at the Drama Theatre. After graduating from the Dnepropetrovsk Music College, he studied in Leningrad. From 1929 he was a soloist at the Opera in Dnepropetrovsk, and from 1931 at the Nemirovicha-Danchenko Musical Theatre in Moscow.

From 1934, he recorded songs. With V. Kandelaki he sang jazz, and he sang with the popular orchestra directed by B. Knushevitsky, and with Boris Alexandrov's Song and Dance Ensemble of All-Union Radio and band. His main repertoire was the songs of Soviet composers. From 1942 to 1967 he was a soloist of the All-Union Radio. For 25 years he performed fine duets with the lyric tenor Vladimir Nechaev (1908-1969) [30] whom he had met during World War II [31].[6]

With the Ensemble of the All-Union Radio Committee under Boris Alexandrov he recorded Evening in the Roadstead/Night on the Road duet with P. Mikhailov (recorded 1942) [32]. This is a baritone-tenor duet, and the choir includes women sopranos. He also recorded Nightingale in the 1940s as a baritone-tenor duet with Georgi Pavlovich Vinogradov [33] [34], It's a Long Time Since We Were Home duet with V. Nechaev [35].

E. Burchak

(Russian: Е.Бурчаков), bass-baritone soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Not a - Do Not Know (music: S. Tulika; lyrics: V. Malkov).

Victor Sergeievich Buzurov

(Russian: Виктор Сергеевич Бузлов). Tenor soloist. Joined the Ensemble ca.1970. Since 1990 he has recorded with the Don Cossack Choir and V. Gavva, singing religious songs. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he has recorded The Birch Tree (1987), Distant Northern Town trio with S. Ivanov and P. Bogachev (1992), Moscow [36].

Vladimir Chernykh and Ivan Bukreev

Vladimir Chernykh

(Russian: Черных, Владимир), tenor soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Jet Pilot, Ballad of the Red Army, Loyalty duet (possibly with G. Andryushchenko [37]), Hail to the Infantry! with V. Shkaptsov (1978) and unknown song [38].

  • Critical commentary on a music video featuring Chernykh and Bukreev (see image left): They sing The Grey Cuckoo on Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble[39] This screenshot illustrates the sheer lack of public ego among the tenors of the Ensemble. In the West, a duet or trio of lyric tenors is always something of a competition for audience attention on the part of the singers - but here it is always a matter of humility to the music: blending; complementing; adjusting of the voice for perfect harmony of dynamic and musicality. The duettists always behave like the army choristers, whom Boris Alexandrov famously described as being so well-discipined due to regular square-bashing. This, of course, was a joke as they are clearly as exhaustively rehearsed as any Georg Solti choir. This screenshot shows them not showing off, but simply working. It helps to illustrate that this army choir was really born of the Kazan Cathedral choir where Alexander Alexandrov learned his trade all those decades ago. The choir was never a sport of the operatic stage where Boris was trained.[40]

Ivan Alexandrovich Didenko

See image here. Soloist of the choir. Russian: И.А. Диденко); Tenor soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Lights Black Sun (music: A. Doluhanyan; lyrics: M. Lisyansky), The Birch Tree (1956) [41] [42], Snowflakes (1956) [41] [42] [43].

V. Dmitriev

See image here. (Russian: В.Дмитриев), bass soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded the beautiful and dramatic Halt, Who Goes There! (music: B. Muradeli; lyrics: E. Dolmatovskaya).

A.A. Eisen. [44]

Arthur Arturovich Eisen

See photos here. (Russian: Артур Артурович Эйзен), bass-baritone soloist. (b.Moscow 8 June 1927; d.Moscow 26 February 2008). Soloist of the Bolshoi Theatre, Honoured Artist of Russia (1956), Order of the Red Banner of Labour (1971), People's Artist of the USSR (1976), Order of Friendship of Peoples (1988). He was born into a family of Latvian revolutionaries, and his family was also musical; his father was a violinist [45]. After leaving school in 1944 he joined the Shchukin Theatre School at the Stanislavsky and Nemirovich-Danchenko Moscow Academic Music Theatre. He studied with future stars, and his singing teacher had been famous in the past: N.Popovoy-Narutovich. He left college in 1948 and joined a youth literary reading group. On a performing tour in the Ukraine he sang, making their tour a hit. Back in Moscow he spent a year at Gnessin State Musical College. He then attended Moscow Conservatory and in 1955, a year before graduating, he won the gold medal at the World Festival of Youth and Students in Warsaw.

While studying at the Moscow Conservatory he became a soloist for the Alexandrov Ensemble 1949-1956. This involved lessons at the Conservatory, exams and rehearsals, performances and concert tours with the choir in the USSR, foreign tours and mandatory daily rehearsals with an accompanist. He was also preparing for big solo performances at major concert halls in Moscow. He became well-known and often appeared on radio. Following this he gained fame on the international opera circuit after a successful 1956 debut as Don Basilio in Barber of Seville [46] [47]. He was praised in the American, British and Japanese press [48]. From 1956, for 40 years, he was a soloist at the Bolshoi Theatre, singing major roles [49] . With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded: Elegy, Oh No John (1956) [42], Cold Waves Lapping (1956), Black Raven [50] duet with N.A. Abramov (1956), 4 unknown solos (1956) [45], Song of the Volga Boatmen [41] [42] [51] [52].

Vasily Eliseev

Vasily Eliseev

Soloist of the choir. Birthdate unknown; died aged ca.40 years. (Russian:Василий Елисеев), tenor with countertenor capability, i.e. with smooth transition to upper range, and good tone and projection throughout. There is a long tradition of countertenors in the Orthodox Church; this tradition continued during the Soviet era. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded: Listen. On the Kultur video from which the screenshot is taken, Eliseev is incorrectly named as Nicolai A. Abramov.[53][54][55][56]

  • Critical commentary on a music video featuring Vasily Eliseev (see screenshot, left): Eliseev sings Listen on the music video Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble[39] The song, Listen, takes full advantage of Eliseev's countertenor capability. According to Eliseev's apparent age in the screenshot, he was probably born in the 1920s and spent his early career in World War II: a time of great hardship for the general populace. Music was a great solace for the troops and the people, and the Alexandrovs felt the need to produce a full range of compositions. They needed sopranos for their choir and soloists, but were not permitted them. Eliseev filled a need for a beautiful and highly trained voice, to allow not just extended chords for drama and pathos in the video, but chords to provide a beauty and spiritual dimension in the arrangement of Listen, in which a political prisoner voices his dreams of Outside. Just as the spiritual dimension of the song appears to reach through the music to beyond the studio, so this singer appears to be conscious of a level beyond himself, as seen in the screenshot, and as heard in his ethereal upper register.[57]

V. Fedorov

See image here. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded: Bandura duet with I. Savchuk (1956) [58] [59].

Stanislav Ivanovich Frolov

See image here. (Russian: Станислав Иванович Фролов), magnificent Russian basso profondo (from GABTa). Ten years after graduation he worked as a film camera operator. He was then admitted to the State Music School in the Komi-Zyryan Autonomous Oblast. From 1960 to 1962 he was employed by the Kyrgyz Academy Theatre, then from 1964 to 1967 by the Belarusian Opera and Ballet. He joined the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow as soloist, and in 1970 joined their tour to Japan. He joined the Alexandrov Ensemble in 1976, and was part of its tour to Japan in the same year [60]. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Great October Holiday (music: Boris Alexandrov; lyrics: S. Bencken), Song of the Dnieper (music: M. Fradkin [61]; music: E. Dolmatovskaya), The Red Cavalry (Civil War song: D. Pokrass) [62], Song of the Fatherland, Song of the Golden Calf from the opera Faust (1995), Soldiers' Song (1983) [63].

Valery Gavva

See image here. (Russian: Валерий Гавва), fine Russian bass. (b. Donetsk, Ukraine, 1947). He is descended from an old Cossack family. He attended the Industrial University of Rostov, and did military service in the Urals. After that, he studied music at the University of Donetsk in Ukraine. After graduating, he became an operatic soloist. In 1987 he joined the Ensemble as a bass soloist, and became People's Artist of the USSR. He did a 1996 tour to Japan with the National Opera Theatre of Leningrad, singing in Modest Mussorgsky's opera Boris Godunov. He broadcast with the Don Cossack Choir, and recorded in 1994 and 1995. In 2002 he performed with the Moscow Radio and Television Choir in Korea [64].

With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Treasured Stone (music: B. Mokrousov; lyrics A. Zharov), Poem of the Ukraine (music: Alexander Alexandrov; lyrics: O. Kolychev), Dark Eyes with A. Molostov, trumpet (trad; arr. Dmitri Oleg Yachinov) [65] [66]. He has made many more recordings [67].

Konstantin Gerasimov

Konstantin Grigorievich Gerasimov

Soloist of the Ensemble. (b.1912). (Russian: Константин Григорьевич Герасимов).[68] People's Artist of Russia (1962); bass-baritone soloist. After graduating from the College of Light Industry he studied singing while working as a clerk in charge of plant management. In 1936 he enlisted as an army sniper so as to be allowed into the Alexandrov Ensemble to get musical training and experience. In 1969 he became a leading baritone soloist.

With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded The Death of Varyag (music: A. Turischev; lyrics: R. Greynts; E.Studinskaya) (1959/63), Barrow (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: E. Dolmatovskaya), Marine Guard (music: Y. Milutin; lyrics: V.Lebedev-Kumach), Moscow-Beijing (music: B. Muradeli; lyrics: M. Vershinin) (1950), We Are For Peace (music: S. Tulika; lyrics: A. Zharov), Song of the Ballistic Missile duet with A. Sergeev (music: S. Tulika; lyrics: M. Andronov), It's a Long Way to Tipperary (1956) [69] [70], Song of Japan, Our Bodyguard duet with V.V. Puckkov (1951), Near the Border, Song of the Military Alliance (1960), unknown operatic aria, Song of Russia (1960/63) [71].

Pyotr Gluboky

See image here. (b. Volgograd, 1947), bass soloist. From 1967 to 1973 he studied at Gnessin State Musical College. In 1972 he began working as a soloist at the Bolshoi Theatre. He was a Glinka Competition winner in 1973, and in 1974 he won the grand prize in the Toulouse International Competition. He was also professor at the Gnessin State Musical College. He became People's Artist of the USSR. He performed as a guest soloist for the Alexandrov Ensemble on tours to Japan. He recorded with the Bolshoi Theatre company [72].

Vladimir P. Gorlanov

(Russian: Владимир П. Горланов), tenor soloist from mid-1950s until 1960. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded: Virgin Land (1960), Song of the Defence, Regiment Polka duet with I.S. Bukreev [73].

Nikolai Gres

Nikolai Timofeyevich Gres

Soloist of the Ensemble. Born 1920; died 2003 or 2004. (Russian: Николай Тимофеевич Гресь), tenor soloist. Honoured Artist of Russia (1966). During World War II he sustained an injury resulting in a brain contusion. From 1946 he was a soloist of the Black Sea Fleet Ensemble. From 1955 to 1963[74] he was a soloist of the Bolshoi Theatre. He then joined the Alexandrov Ensemble[75] until the 1970s.[76] With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded I am from Berlin/To Leave Berlin (music: I. Dunaevsky; lyrics: L. Oshanin) (1966), The Night of May operatic aria, The Birch Tree (ca.1960) [77], Truth of the Century, The River Flows (1963), My Friends and an unknown song duets with A.S. Sibirtsev, The Grey Cuckoo, unknown song (1966), I Have Travelled the World (1969) [78].

  • Critical commentary on a music video featuring Nikolai Gres (see screenshot right): Gres sings The Birch Tree on the music video Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble[39] This is a late medieval composition about a man sitting under a birch tree, whittling and thinking of women. It is usually categorised as a folk song as the name of the composer has been lost. However it is clearly a professional composition of a quality comparative to those of medieval Northern European composers of troubadour songs, such as Dufay and Binchois. This performance is part of the history of the early music revival movement. In the 19th century, rediscovered early music, along with folk music, was usually arranged to be performed in the grand orchestral or Italian operatic style. However, such music had always survived in church music, in one form or another, and people were used to hearing it performed in the style of traditional European church choirs: no vibrato; pure and clear tone; adjusting the voice production to the acoustics of the building. In church music, the building was always the secondary soundbox for the vocal instrument (the nasal cavity being the first). From the 1950s, early music performance reverted to this ecclesiastical style of singing. So the Alexandrov Ensemble performance of ca.1963 was very modern for its time. Gres sings like a church choir baritone, with the same appearance of spiritual joy as any oratorio soloist. The screenshot does not capture such a moment, but it does show the sheer effort that the performance required. His voice is responding to a building-soundbox too; in this case a recording studio. The Russian practice of the time was to film outdoors and then dub the sound later. [79] Studio dubbing tends to appear artificial today, but on this occasion it is advantageous, as the church choral style does need a building-soundbox. From the 1970s, some early music singers, such as the Martin Best Ensemble, started to reflect what may have been the contemporary late medieval performance-style of troubadour songs: that is, the Arab singing style which can still be heard in Islamic sung prayer. Hence Gres' performance now sounds a little dated, but remains nonetheless one of the finest recorded performances of this song.[80]
Sergei Ivanov and Pyotr Bogachev

Sergei Vasilievich Ivanov

(Russian: Сергей Васильевич Иванов), tenor soloist. Honoured Artist of Russia. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded In the Ocean Gave duet with P. Bogachev (music: B. Korostylev; lyrics: B. Bezhaev), It's a Long Time Since We Were Home duet with P. Bogachev (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: A. Fatyanov), We, the Army People duet with P. Bogachev (music: G. Movsesyan; lyrics: Robert Rozhdestvensky), Listen, Beauty duet with P. Bogachev (music: E. Martin; lyrics: M. Plyatskovsky), Soldier System solo (music: I. Yakushenko; lyrics: A. Shaferan), Your Soldiers duet with P. Bogachev (music: B. Gamal; lyrics: A. Sofronov), Smuglianka, duet with P. Bogachev (music: A. Novikov; lyrics: Y. Chvedov) [81], The Samovars duet with P. Bogachev (music A. Novikov; lyrics: S. Alimov) (1982/92) [82], Endless Sea duet with P. Bogachev, The Hero Walks in the Urals solo (1983), Who Protects the Country duet with P. Bogachev, Afield duet with P. Bogachev (1992), Nut Brown Girl duet with P. Bogachev (1989/92, 2003), Evening on the Roads duet with P. Bochachev 1992, Distant Northern Town trio with S.V. Buzurov and P. Bogachev (1992), Dixie duet with P. Bogachev (1992), Greetings from the Troops duet with P. Bogachev, unknown duet with V. Gavva (1992), Our Army duet with P. Bogachev (1984) [83].

  • Critical commentary on a music video featuring Ivanov and Bogachev (see screenshot left): They sing Smuglianka in the DVD Silva America, The Alexandrov Red Army Choir Orchestra - Live in Paris.[84] This performance displays the modern aspect of the Ensemble: performers who are still very much part of the choir, and who still sing in the traditional soldierly, undramatic style, but who are now free to exchange little smiles with the audience, the conductor and each other, as seen in the screenshot - partly reflecting the light subject-matter of the song, and partly in polite acknowledgement of their worldwide popularity as duettists.[85] These are trained and professional singers, who can still perform a light-hearted song in the same intimate manner as lads in a student bar, and this creates immediate empathy in the audience. This is fine, professional singing with an effect as light as air. These performers are able to demonstrate very gently the plane on which musicians live while on stage: the kind of musical ecstasy which only happens when a performance goes just right.[86]

B. Jaivoronok

With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Troika (trad; arr. Dmitri Oleg Yachinov) [87], Gandzia (trad; arr. Dmitri Oleg Yachinov) [88]

Vladimir Nikolaevich Katerinsky

(Russian: Катеринский, Владимир Николаевич) bass-baritone soloist. In the 1940s and 1950s he recorded with the Alexandrov Ensemble: unknown duet with N.A. Abramov (1954), Siberian Child Went to War, Evening on the Roads with V.I. Nikitin, Mary[89] (1951) [90].

Leonid M. Kharitonov

Leonid Kharitonov, 1960s

Soloist of the Ensemble. (b.Golumet, Irkutsk Oblast 1933). (Russian: Л.М. Харитонов). People's Artist of Russia, Honoured Artist of Russia; bass-baritone soloist. Known as Lenya Kharitonov. When his father went missing in World War II, his mother brought him up. At the age of 14yrs he studied locally to be a welder, and began to perform as a singer. At 17 years old he started auditioning at Irkutsk Philharmonic, then at Moscow Philharmonic, and finally was accepted by Moscow Conservatory. This was very difficult because as a Siberian he did not have even a matriculation certificate, but his strong singing voice spoke for him. For nearly 20 years he was a member of the Red Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet army (later the Alexandrov Ensemble): in the choir from 1953 to 1965, and a soloist from 1965 to 1972. He subsequently became a soloist with the Moscow Philharmonic. He performed successfully in most concert halls in Russia: On tour he visited the entire country, including the Kremlin Palace concert hall. He was the pride of Russia, sang at concerts for the Government and for foreign delegations. After that he went on tour abroad a great deal [91]. His biography is here.

With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded The Ballad of the Russian Boy (music: Novikov; lyrics: Oshanin L.), John Reid Goes to Petrograd (music: Novikov; lyrics: M. Vershinin), It is Not the End of the War (music: B. Muradeli; lyrics: M. Andronov), Here Lenin Lived (music: B. Terentiev; lyrics: A. Fatyanov), Lenin's Guard (music: B Aleksandrov; lyrics: M Khotimsk), My Native Land (music: O. Feltsman; lyrics: Oshanin L.), Not Old Soul Veterans (music: Tulika S.; lyrics: Y. Belinsky), Song of Peace (music: B. Muradeli; lyrics: V. Kharitonov), Sedina (music: A. Ekimyan; lyrics: F. Laube), Son of the Fatherland (music: S. Tulika; lyrics: V. Lazarev), The Song of Russia (music: St. Tulika; lyrics: V. Kharitonov), Song of the Volga Boatmen [92] [93], Death of Varyag [94].

Ivan Semionovich Kozlovsky

See image here. (Russian: Иван Семёнович Козловский). (b.Mali, Poltava, Ukraine 1900; d.1993); a lyric tenor. Order of the National Anthem (1941); People's Artist of the USSR (1940). He made his debut at the Kharkiv Opera Theatre. From 1926 to 1954 he was a member of the Bolshoi Theatre. He was professor at Gnessin State Musical College 1956 to 1980, continuing over the age of 80. In Russia has been considered the best tenor in the first half of the 20th century. From the 1920s he recorded opera. In the 1950s with the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded martial music and Russian folk songs, including Song of the Red Navy (1953), In Front of the Forest, and Raw Wilderness [95]. Krushchev said in his autobiography that Kozlovsky was Stalin's favourite tenor and that Koszlovsky was unhappy about this.[96]

Andrey Kusleev

(Russian: Андрей Куслеев), bass-baritone soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Cold Waves Lapping duet with E. Belyaev (music: F. Bogoroditsky; lyrics: Ya Repninsky), Shooting Kommunarov duet with E. Belyaev (music: V.Tan-Bogoraz), a duet with Abramov, Execution of the Warrior Revolution[97] duet with E. Belyaev, Marching song duet with I.A. Didenko, Song of the Red Army Cavalry (recorded 1954), Travel Far duet with V.V. Puchkov [98].

I. Kuznetsov

(Russian: И.Кузнецов), tenor soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Saw the Father and Son (music: (Russian: Компанеец Z.); lyrics: Y. Shvedov) [99] .

Edward Maxovich Labkovsky

See images here, here and here. (b.Kazakhstan 24 July 1938 [100]). (Russian: Эдуард Максович Лабковский), bass soloist. Honoured Artist of Russia (1978); People's Artist of Russia (1988). He moved to Moscow aged 3yrs, after his father, a Soviet official, died. There he worked in an aircraft factory as a fitter-assembler before attending Gnessin State Musical College as a singer instructed by A. Adana. After graduation he took part in a Puccini opera at Moscow Conservatory, did a tour singing across the country from Transdniestria to Sakhalinthen, then joined the Ensemble in 1972. On behalf of the Ensemble, he travelled the country performing solos with a sextet of musicians from the orchestra, and entertaining troops where they were in service [101]. He also performed on film and television, but has been ill recently [102]. With the Alexandrov Ensemble, he recorded Take an Overcoat (music: V. Levashov; lyrics: B. Okudzhava), The Entire Country - It is Our Job (music: B. Terentiev; lyrics: V. Kharitonov), Hot Snow (music: A. Pakhmutova; lyrics: M. Lvov) (1980), Victory Day (music: D. Tuhmanov; lyrics: V. Kharitonov) (1992), Conductors of War (music: B. Figotin; lyrics F. Laube), Otgremeli Near Moscow has Long Battles (music: A. Kukushkin; lyrics: B. Zishenkova), Paratroopers' Song (music: M. Minkov; lyrics: I. Shaferan), Letter From the Depths (music: B. (Russian: Калистратов); lyrics: M. Reytman), Under the Balkan Stars (music: M. Blanter; lyrics: M. Isakovsky), Before it is Too Late (music: A. Pakhmutova; lyrics: N. Dobronravov), Soldiers' Ways duet with Ivan Bukreev (music: B. Aleksandrov; lyrics: B. Dubrovin), Fifth Ocean (music: W. Korostelev; lyrics: B. Bezhaev), Home Country (music: G. Movsesyan; lyrics: B. Gin), Forties (music: I. Katayev; lyrics: D. Samoylov), Tulskaya Defence (music: Novikov; lyrics: V. Guryan), The Shield and Sword (P. Ovsiannikov - S. Volkov), Men (1978), Take the Mantle (1975), Commissars (1980), Parachute Song, The Russians Want War? (1989), Separation, My Country [103] [104].

Konstantin Pavlovich Lisovsky

See image here and here. (b. Leningrad 22 October 1932). Fine tenor soloist. (Russian: К.П. Лисовский); also translated as Lissovsky, Lisovskiy or Lisovski. (People's Artist of Russia (1983), winner of competitions named after Glinka and Tchaikovsky. In 1951 he graduated from the Gorky Aviation Technical School and was sent to the factory. In 1953 was accepted into the Moscow Conservatory where he studied for three years. From 1954 he did military service and sang in the Alexandrov Ensemble, then from 1965 to 1997 he was soloist for the Moscow State Academic Philharmonic Society. In 1967 he graduated from Gnessin State Musical College. He was winner of the Glinka All-Union vocalists' competition (1965) and the International Tchaikovsky Competition (1966). He sang a wide repertoire besides opera, and performed in more than 30 countries. He has performed on the radio, and recorded on vinyl and CDs. Since 1980, he has taught at the Russian Academy of Music (Associate Professor since 1989) [105] [106]. One of his recordings is Golden Lights (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: A. Fatyanov, S. Fogelson)

With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded: The Birch Tree (trad; arr. Dmitri Oleg Yachinov) [107] [108] .

Yuseph Laut

(Russian: Ю.Лаут), tenor soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Song of the Klim Voroshilov duet with Georgiy Babaev (music: Alexander Alexandrov; lyrics: O. Kolychev), Artillery March duet with Oleg Razumovsky (music: Novikov; lyrics: S. Vasiliev).

Alexei P. Martynov

See image here and here. (b.Moscow 4 March 1947). (Russian: А.П. Мартынов); also translated as Martinov and Martin), tenor soloist. (People's Artist of Russia (2003), Professor of the Moscow Conservatory, Laureate of international competitions). He graduated from Gnessin State Musical College in 1970 with a diploma for violin. In 1976 he graduated with honours from the Moscow Conservatory as a singer. Since 1972 he has recorded for television in the USSR and Russia, totalling many hours of music: opera, operetta, oratorio, cantata, duets, romances and songs of composers of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, folk songs, recordings of symphonic, chamber, folk, and pop music, and with instrumental ensembles. He won second prize at the International Vocal Competition in Budapest, Hungary in 1975, and fourth prize at the International Vocal Competition in Aldborough, UK in 1978. He was a member of the international jury of the Dmitry Shostakovich contest at Hanover, Germany, in 1997. He is involved with the Shubertovskogo music company in Moscow. He has recorded Song of the Space Gulls (music: C. sheets; lyrics: L. Kondyrev) [109]

With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded In a Sunny Forest Clearing (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: A. Fatyanov), The Roads (music: A. Novikov; lyrics: L. Ochanine; arr. V. Samsonenko) [110].

P. Mikhailov

Tenor soloist. With the Ensemble of the All-Union Radio Committee under Boris Alexandrov he recorded Evening in the Roadstead/Night on the Road duet with Vladimir Bunchikov (recorded 1942) [111] This is a bass-baritone-tenor duet, and the choir includes women sopranos.

P. Mikhailov could be identical with Pavel Mihailov, who recorded with a jazz orchestra in the popular radio style of the 1930s. In most of his recordings he uses a light voice suitable for radio or film, but in some, such as Boat, Mihailov exhibits the kind of powerful tenor, favoured by the Alexandrov Ensemble, to be heard above the choir and orchestra [112].

Victor Nikitin

Victor Ivanovich Nikitin

(Russian: Виктор Иванович Никитин), tenor soloist, born in Voronezh and died in Moscow.[113] His dates or birth and death are unknown, but it is possible that he was born 1914-1918 and we know he was alive in 1988.[114] He was a machine engineer in 1938, and joined the Ensemble in the same year.[115] He had possibly started recording by 1936. He was already known as "Mr Kalinka" before World War Two.[113] [116]. With the Alexandrov Ensemble from 1938 to 1952 he recorded Meeting With the Chief (music: A. Alexandrov; lyrics: P. Herman), Cold Waves Lapping (music: F. Bogoroditsky; lyrics: Ya Repninsky 1950), Samovary-Samopaly (or Military Samovars) duet with S. Tibaev (recorded 1941), Red Fleet Refugees (recorded 1943) (music A. Alexandrov; lyrics N. Labkovsky 1943) [117], Smuglanka, duet with N. Ustinov (recorded 1945), Kalinka [118], Evening on the Waterfront solo and as duet with V.N.Katerinsky, Winter Evening (1951) [119] [120], Troika (1948) [121] [122] [123], Down by Mother Volga [124]. He recorded Song of my country in Prague 26 October 1952.

Apparently when he sang to entertain the Russian troops at the Eastern Front in World War II, the Germans on the other side stopped shooting to listen [125] [126] . The German appreciation of Nikitin did not end there. At the Alexandrov Ensemble August 1948 Peace Concert, he sang encores of Kalinka and received high praise for his singing. Before the concert he had bought a book of 10 German folk songs, and then persuaded Boris Alexandrov and the USSR commanders to let him sing some of them in German. This would be seen by the German audience as a great commitment to peace. In a photograph taken from the back of the choir at the time, you can see some of the 30,000-strong audience with the destroyed city as a backdrop. You can just see the flowers along the front of the stage, and to the left of the photo, standing in front of the balalaika players is a young soloist, perhaps waiting for Boris to indicate the start of his song. This is the scene which Nikitin, the choir and the orchestra saw on that day in 1948 [127]. A 1985 Radio DDR recording (named Auf gutem Weg Mit Guten Freunden) exists of part of this 1948 Berlin concert. Nikitin sang Im Schönsten Wiesengrunde clip (link), Ich Freue Mich Ihnen Mein Lied Zu Singen (a spoken introduction by Nikitin to Kalinka, recorded in 1988) and Kalinka [128]. In 2007, Nikitin was still remembered by Leonid Maleev, director of the Ensemble, as the earliest "Mr Kalinka" [129]. It has been rumoured that Nikitin was in disgrace after singing in German in 1948, and that this eventually ended his career in 1952; however it is now said that he simply returned to the Ensemble choir in 1952, by his own choice, due to a strained or tired voice. He continued to be popular with Stalin, who used to wave to him in a friendly manner at concerts.[113] Nikitin could not have returned to the choir without Stalin's approval; however many relevant source-documents from this era have been destroyed.

V. Pankov

(Russian: В.Панков), tenor soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Song of the Bluhera duet with Georgiy Babaev (music: Alexander Alexandrov; lyrics: S. Alymov) [130].

I. Pchenitchni

With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded My Country (trad; arr. B. Alexandrov)[131].

N.S. Polozkov

(Russian: Н.С. Полозков). With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded: Ah Lovely Night (1956) [132].

Vladimir Vsevolod Puchkov

(Russian: Всеволод В. Пучков), tenor soloist (later Mariinsky Theatre soloist). With the Alexandrov Ensemble in the 1940s and 50s he recorded Song of Peace and Friendship (music: B. Shainsky, M. Jordan; lyrics: M. Lisyansky), Song of the Young Soldiers duet with Georgiy Babaev (music: P. Akulenko; lyrics: Ya Shvedov) (1950), unknown operatic aria (1951), Travel Far, Ten Thousand Years of Our Country duet with G.I. Babaev (1951), In a Sunny Forest Clearing, Russia, unknown song (1954), Our Bodyguard duet with K.G. Gerasimov (1951) [133].

Oleg N. Razumovsky

(Russian: Олег Н. Разумовский), bass-baritone soloist. With Georgy Vinogradov he recorded We Assumed Polsveta (music: S. Katz; lyrics: A. Sofronov) [134]. With the Alexandrov Ensemble in the 1940s to 60s he recorded American Soldiers' Song (music: B. Hills), In the Battle for the Motherland (music: Компанеец Z.; lyrics: L. Oshanin), In a good hour! (music: K. sheets; lyrics: A. Zharov), Goodbye, Mom (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: A. Galić), Pub (music: B. Hills), As for the Kama, the River (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: Vladimir Gusev), Krasnoflotskaya Smile (music: N. Budashkin; lyrics: A. Fidrovsky), Swallow-Kasatochka (music: E. Zharkovsky; lyrics: O. Kolychev), Artillery March duet with Yuri Louth (music: Novikov; lyrics: S. Vasiliev), Sailor's Waltz (music: V. Sorokin; lyrics: S. Fogelson), It's a Long Way to Tipperary (music: D. Judge; lyrics S. Bolotin), Night (Music: L.D. Utesov; lyrics: I. Fradkin), Eternal Glory to our Hero duet with B.G. Shapenko, Dance Dance, Echo Across the River, Farewell, Song of the Coachman, Song of the Unified (1949), When We Part [135] [136].

Mark Reizen

Mark Reizen

(1895-1992). Basso profondo soloist at the Mariinsky Theatre and Bolshoi Theatre. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded The Fond Stone, transmitted on Soviet All-Union radio in 1947 [137], Song of the Volga Boatmen (trad; arr. Dmitri Oleg Yachinov) [138].

Vadim Ruslanov

Vadim Lvovich Ruslanov

Soloist of the Ensemble. (b.1926). (Russian: Вадим Львович Русланов). People's Artist of the USSR (1974); bass soloist. His mother was an actress; he attended drama school, and became an actor attached to a Moscow theatre. However he still had a passion for music and studied at Gnessin State Musical College. He joined the Alexandrov Ensemble in 1958. With the Alexandrov Ensemble during the 1960s and 70s he recorded: And the Song Goes to War (music: M. Fradkin; lyrics: C. Islands), Cranes (music: J. Frenkel; Lyrics: R. Gamzatov), Solidarity March (music: S. Tulika; lyrics: A. Sofronov), A Peaceful Country (music: A. Averkin; lyrics: A. Turkin), Angels Brothers or Brothers in Heaven (music: A. Averkin; lyrics: P. Gradov) (ca.1965), Invisible Soldiers of the Front (music: Novikov; lyrics: P. Gradov), Song of the Faraway Homeland (music: M. Tariverdiyev; lyrics: Robert Rozhdestvensky), Victory (music: V. Shainsky; lyrics: L. Oshanin), Regimental Band duet with Vadim V. Shkaptsov (music: L. Lyadov; lyrics: G. Hodos), Do you Hear me, Paris (music: A. Ostrovsky; lyrics: L. Oshanin), Soldiers Pribautki duet with E. Belyaev (music: A. Doluhanyan; lyrics: G. Hodos), Soldiers Are Always Soldiers (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: M. Matusovsky) (1960/68), Oh No John, Ballad of the Eternal, Dance Dance (1975), Take the Mantle (1980), The Wind Sounds (1966), He is a Man, Kutuzov's Heart, Military Musician, Murderers Roam the Earth, Farewell Love (1966), Third Battalion, Voices of the Earth, Song of Unity, Sentry Post, My Friends I Believe, Paris, Old Soldier's Song, Bravo the Soldiers (1969), Song of Friendship, World Peace, Daughter is Water (1966), The Stone (1973), Rocket Troops March, Ready Rocket Forces duet with I.S. Bukreev, The Russians Want War? (1963/64), Song of Russia (ca.1965), Song of the Russian Soldiers, Our Country Russia (1960) [139].

Kimbazar Sadaev

Soloist of the choir.

Ivan Savchuk

Ivan Ivanovich Savchuk

(Russian: Иван Иванович Савчук), tenor soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble in the 1950s he recorded Smuglyanka duet with Ivan Abramov (music: Novikov; lyrics: Ya Shvedov), Dark Eyes (1956), Sweet Fruit, Nut-Brown Girl (1953, 1956), Nut Brown Maiden duet with N. Abramov (1956) [8], Happy Girl, Near the Garden trio with I.S. Bukreev and E. Belyaev, Bandura both as solo and as duet with V. Fedorov (1951/56) [58] [140] [141], I Look Up at the Sky, Black Eyebrows (1956) [142].

Alexei Sergeev

Alexei Tikhonovich Sergeev

See a typical, jolly image. Soloist of the Ensemble. (Russian: Алексей Тихонович Сергеев). Born 24 January 1919 in Gerasimovka in the Tambov region of Russia. People's Artist of the USSR (1967), State Prize of the USSR. Graduated from Gnessin State Musical College. From 1940 to 1968 he was bass singer with the Alexandrov Ensemble; promoted to soloist 1950. Performed in recitals from 1968 [143]. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Ballad of the Tank (music: IE Zharkovsky; lyrics: Yuri Kamenetsky; M. Kravchuk) (1951?), Memoirs of Algiers (music: B. Muradeli; lyrics: E. Dolmatovskaya), Duma of the Motherland (music: S. Tulika; lyrics: V. Malkov), Stars Lovely Homeland (music: I. Dunaevsky; lyrics: M. Matusovsky) (1965?), Nothing Was Said (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: A. Fatyanov), On the Rocks, Granite Rocks (music: B. Terentiev; lyrics: AN Bukin), Bryansky Partisan Song duet with E. Belyaev (music: D. Kabalevsky; lyrics: V.Lebedev-Kumach), Song of the Ballistic Missile (music: S. Tulika; lyrics: M. Andronov), Third Battalion (music: B. Mokrousov; lyrics: A. Fatyanov), Soldiers Carry Out the Order (music: O. Feltsman; lyrics: V. Sergeev), Stenka Razin (1951/56/63) [144] [145] [146] [147], Along Peterskaya Road/Street (trad; arr. Dmitri Oleg Yachinov) (1956/60/66) [148] [149] [150] [151] [152], Ah Nastasia (trad; arr. B. Alexandrov) (1968) [153] [154], unknown operatic aria, Song of the Volga Boatmen, Ukrainian Poem (1956/60/63) [155] [156], See the Village, unknown song, Under the Elm, Under the Oak (1963, 2007) [157], Can You Hear Me Brother, Marching Song, Cossack Cossack, Work Song (1956), Her Son-in-Law, Cheesecake, If I Had a Hammer (1956) [158], The Motto of the Struggle, Uncle (1951), Red Sun (1960), Rain, Bryansk Forest, Old Urals, Soldier's Farewell, Star, Song of the Poplar, Groove, Ballad of the Moscow Boy, The Little Bells, Night, Spend an Evening (1977), Lenin Lived Here, Story of Russia, Only Russia [159].

Boris G. Shapenko

Soloist of the Ensemble. (Russian: Борис Г. Шапенко), bass soloist of the Bolshoi Theatre. Honoured Artist of Russia. With the Alexandrov Ensemble in the 1960s he recorded It is the Soviet Navy (music: K. Sheets; lyrics: V. Guryan), Song of the Volga Boatmen (music: M. Fradkin) [160], The Long-Range Guns Are Silent (music: M. Blanter; lyrics: M. Matusovsky), Rodina (music: S. Tulika; lyrics: Yu Polukhin), Evening on the Road/Night on the Road (1980s) duet with E. Belyaev (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: A. Churkin), Eternal Glory duet with O.N. Razumovsky, Song of the Red Army Cavalry, Country, unknown opera aria, Spring in Berlin (1965), The Fun and Joy (1969), Song of Russia [161].

Boris Shemyakov

(Russian: Борис Шемяков), bass-baritone soloist from the 1970s onward. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded: Sailors March duet with V. Shkaptsov, Spring 1945 duet with I.S. Bukreev, Hawks [162].

Vladimir Shkaptsov

Soloist of the choir. (Russian:Владимир Шкапцов), bass soloist in the 1960s and 70s. In 1957 he graduated from Gnessin State Musical College. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded: Regimental Band duet with Vadim Ruslanov (music: L. Lyadov; lyrics: G. Hodos), Sailors March duet with B. Shemyakov, Song of the March-Past duet with A.S. Sibirtsev, Hail to the Infantry! duet with V. Chernykh [163].

Vasily Ivanovich Shtefutsa

See image here and here. Also spelled Chtefoutsa. (Russian: Василий Иванович Штефуца), current tenor soloist. People's Artist of the USSR (1993). From a farming family in the Ukraine. He sang in the choir of the Uzhhorod School of Music, then attended Gnessin State Musical College, graduating in 1965. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he was at first in the choir, then as a soloist from 1970 he recorded You are One of Us (music: A. Doluhanyan; lyrics: M. Lisyansky), Moscow (music: D. Tuhmanov; lyrics: B. Dubrovin), Kalinka [164] [165] and Korobelniki [166] (both trad.; arr. Dmitri Oleg Yachinov). He won a prize in the Polish song festival of 1972 [167].

Alexander Sergeievich Sibirtsev

Soloist of the choir. (b.1935). (Russian: Александр Сергеевич Сибирцев), dramatic tenor soloist. People's Artist of the USSR. Studied at Gnessin State Musical College. From 1963 he was a soloist of the Opera and Ballet Theatre in Gorky. In 1964 he spent a year[168] as a soloist of the Alexandrov Ensemble, then became soloist of Perm and Samara Opera. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded: My Friends duet with N.T. Gres, unknown song duet with N.T. Gres, Song of the March-Past with N.T. Shkaptsov [169].

B. Slastnoi

With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Bella Ciao duet with I. Bukreev (Italian partisan song; arr. B. Pogrebov) [170] [171]

Anatoly Borisovich Solovyanenko

See image here and here. Guest soloist. (b.Donetsk, Ukraine September 25 1932; d. 29 July 1999 or 2000; Ukrainian: Анатолій Борисович Соловяненко, Russian: Анатолий Борисович Соловьяненко). People's Artist of the USSR (before 1978), People's artist of Ukraine, State Taras Shevchenko prize-winner [172]. He was born into a mining family, and graduated from Donetsk Polytechnic Institute in 1954, having taken singing lessons from 1950. He began his career in Donetsk, where there is now a monument in his memory [173]. He did 12 performances at the Metropolitan Opera in Kiev, then graduated from Kiev Conservatory in 1978. For 30 years he was soloist at the Taras Shevchenko National Opera and Ballet Theatre in Kiev, and performed at Expo 67 in Montreal [174]. He performed as soloist for Alexandrov Ensemble during its UK tour 1988, singing Kalinka and others [175]. He recorded 18 LPs: arias, romances and songs [176].

A. Syrovatko-Zolotarev

(Russian: А.Сыроватко-Золотарёв), tenor soloist. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded I Am From Berlin (music: I. Dunaevsky; lyrics: L. Oshanin).

Barseg Tumanyan

See image here. Guest soloist. (b.Yerevan 1958). Renowned Armenian bass soloist. (Russian: Б.Р. Туманян) (People's Artist of Armenia, soloist of Yerevan Opera and the Metropolitan Opera, the winner of the Tchaikovsky contest). With the Alexandrov Ensemble in ca.1960 he sang Granada [177] and the Toreador Song from Bizet's Carmen, and received a seemingly endless ovation [178] In 2008 he celebrated his 50th anniversary as a bass soloist with the Opera [179]. In 2007 Tumanyan was interviewed by M. Zatikyan [180]. His biography is here.

Alexei Ivanovich Usmanov

See image here. (b.Moscow 1916; d.1990). (Russian: Алексей Усманов), tenor soloist. He began singing in the amateur choir of the Automobile Club before World War II. He wanted to join the choir of the All-Union Radio, but World War II began. As a soldier he fought bravely when an armoured personnel carrier was hit; for this he was awarded the Order of the Red Star. In the late 1940s he became a soloist of All-Union Radio, and in the early 1960s began to record duets with Victor Selivanov [181]. With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded You Often Write Soldier (music: B. Terentiev; lyrics: S. Bencken). In 1954 he took part in a recording of The Enchantress by Pyotr Tchaikovsky with the Moscow Philharmonia State Orchestra and Radio USSR chorus.

Georgi Vinogradov, 1940s.

Georgi Pavlovich Vinogradov

(Russian: Г.П. Виноградов), tenor soloist (b.Kazan 16 November 1908; d.Moscow 11 November 1980). Honoured Artist of Russia (1949). From about 1937 he sang jazz, opera and Soviet lyric songs on Radio Moscow and in World War II he sang with the USSR Committee of Defense Model Orchestra. From 1943 to 1951 he was a soloist with the Alexandrov Ensemble; however in 1951 there was apparently a bar-room brawl which embarrassed the Soviet government, and finished his career [182]. See his own page for further information.

With the Alexandrov Ensemble he recorded Two Maxims (recorded 1943) [183], Oh the Road [184], In a Forest at the Front (recorded 1945), Nightingale (recorded 1950), Dark Night (recorded 1945) [185]. In the 1940s he also recorded Nightingale as a duet with the baritone Vladimir Bunchikov [186], and The Bending Branch (or Luchina [187]) as a solo with the Alexandrov Ensemble [188] [189] [190] [191] .

Igor F. Volkov

(Russian: И.Ф. Волков) (Bass soloist of the Novosibirsk Opera House). He sang with the Alexandrov Ensemble in the 1970s and 80s, and performed Dark Eyes/Black Eyes (1978) [192].

Leonid V. Wheat

(Russian: Леонид В. Пшеничный) [193], tenor soloist (People's Artist of Russia). With the Alexandrov Ensemble, he recorded Birch Dreams (music: B. Geviksman; lyrics: G. Fere), In the Dugouts (music: K. sheets; lyrics: A. Surkov), Where Are You Now, Odnopolchane Friends? (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: A. Fatyanov), Let Lit[194] (music: M. Tabachnikov; lyrics: I. Frenkel), Katyusha (music: M. Blanter; lyrics: M. Isakovsky), My Favourite (music: M. Blanter; lyrics: E. Dolmatovskaya), Parade of Victory (music: V. Pleshakov; lyrics: B. Levtov), Oh, the Road (music: Novikov; lyrics: Oshanin L.).

Boris Grigorievich Zhayvoronok

See image here. (b.1938) (Russian: Борис Григорьевич Жайворонок) bass-baritone soloist. People's Artist of Russia and Honoured Artist of Ukraine (1972). In 1964 he graduated from the Kharkiv Institute of Arts. From 1965 he was soloist at the Kharkiv Opera and Ballet. He was with the Alexandrov Ensemble 1981-1998 and he recorded The Enemies of the Burned Home (music: M. Blanter; lyrics: M. Isakovsky), My Moscow (music: I.M. Dunaevsky; lyrics: S. Agranyan, M. Lisyansky), Ogonek (lyrics: M. Isakovsky), It is time to Take the Road (music: V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics: S. Fogelson), Farewell, Rocky Mountains (music: E. Zharkovsky; lyrics: A.N. Bukin), Troika and Granada [195].

Other Soloists

Lev Leshchenko (b.1942): a soloist with the Ensemble from 1962. With the Alexandrov ensemble he performed Den Pobedy on Soviet TV (1976)[196].
A.I. Mischenko (Russian: А.И. Мищенко) (from GABTa).

Current Soloists

Valery Gavva. See image here.
Vasily Ivanovich Shtefutsa. See image here.
Edward Maxovich Labkovsky. See image here.
S.V. Ivanov Honoured Artist of Russia. See image here.
P.D. Bogachev Honoured Artist of Russia. See image here.
V.P. Maystruk Honoured Artist of Russia
A.A. Gvozdetsky Honoured Artist of Russia
B.M. Mizyuk Honoured Artist of Russia [197] [198] See image here.
Ensign Victor Sanin. See image here.
Ensign Dmitry Bykov. See image here.
Ensign Vadim Petrovich Ananyev. See image here.
Tatiana Deryabkina Honoured Artist of Russia
Boris Diakov. See image here.

See also

References

  1. ^ Classic Record Collector, Spring 2004: Max Loppert
  2. ^ Guildmusic.com webpage: contains reference to Vinogradov and bar-room brawl.
  3. ^ Information from Leonid Mikhailovich Kharitonov who was a member of the Ensemble 1953-1972
  4. ^ CD: Melodiya: Sacred War (in Russian), MELCD60-00938/1: "Bryansk Forest".
  5. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of G. Abramov
  6. ^ a b "Retro.samnet". Biography of Georgi Abramov. http://retro.samnet.ru/pevets/pevets.htm. Retrieved 29 December 2009.  
  7. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: G. Abramov biog and songlist: "Already as the Sea"
  8. ^ a b CD: EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4, "Nut Brown Maiden".
  9. ^ CD: EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4, "The Little Bells".
  10. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Nicolai Abramov
  11. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, D1106: "Listen": the singer credited with the performance of "Listen" on this DVD is Vasily Eliseev (identified by Leonid Mikhailovich Kharitonov, who sang in the Alexandrov Ensemble with both singers).
  12. ^ Translated Russian webpage: birth date of Georgy Andryushchenko.
  13. ^ Japanese "Red Army" webpage: biography of Andryushenko.
  14. ^ Epinions: Review of Khovanshchina recording 1979
  15. ^ YouTube: Khovanshchina; Andryushchenko as Andrei
  16. ^ Russian Wikipedia: Bolshoi Opera Company page: list of performers with dates of service.
  17. ^ Translated operamusic.ru webpage: "Famous Russian Soviet Singers"
  18. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of V.I. Anisimov.
  19. ^ Sci-lib: image of Belyaev
  20. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: biog of Belyaev
  21. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, D1106: Oh the Rye; Kalinka.
  22. ^ CD: Melodiya: Sacred War (in Russian), MELCD60-00938/1: Nightingales.
  23. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "Smuglianka", "The Samovars"
  24. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Pyotr Bogachev
  25. ^ Translated Library.Karelia.ru: short biog of Bukreev.
  26. ^ These are Russian descriptions of voice-types which may not precisely reflect the European voice types.
  27. ^ YouTube: Ivan Bukreev singing "I Took You Into the Tundra 1982
  28. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "Moscow Nights", "Bella Ciao"
  29. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Ivan Bukreev
  30. ^ Translaged narod.ru webpage: biography of V. Nechaev.
  31. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of VA Bunchikov
  32. ^ Armchairgeneral page: "Evening in the Roadstead".
  33. ^ Youtube: Vinogradov and Bunchikov sing "Nightingale"
  34. ^ Translated kkre-20.narod.ru webpage: Biography of Bunchikov.
  35. ^ CD: Melodiya: Sacred War (in Russian), MELCD60-00938/1: "It's a Long Time".
  36. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Victor Buzurov
  37. ^ Translated Japanese Website: source for possible duet with Andryushchenko
  38. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Vladimir Chernykh
  39. ^ a b c D1106. ISBN 0-7697-8690-1. B0013N3LIG, published by Kultur, ca.1960, dir: I. Jugashvili. Musical dir: Boris Alexandrov, filmed in the USSR. See Alexandrov Ensemble discography for further details.
  40. ^ Important: Before editing this critical commentary, please read the section "Critical Commentaries" on the article discussion page.
  41. ^ a b c CD: EMI: Soviet Army Chorus & Band, CDC-7-47833-2 DIDX-1015
  42. ^ a b c d CD: EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4
  43. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Biography and songlist of Didenko.
  44. ^ Source of Eisenach image: Biograph.ru
  45. ^ a b Translated Japanese webpage: Arthur Eisen
  46. ^ Translated Biograph.ru biog of Eisenach
  47. ^ Translated Sovmusic.ru biog and image of Eisenach
  48. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of Arthur Eisen.
  49. ^ Translated operamusic.ru webpage: "Famous Russian Soviet Singers".
  50. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: list of songs recorded by Arthur Eisen.
  51. ^ CD: Silva Classics: The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034
  52. ^ kkre-48.narod.ru webpage: Biography of Arthur Eisen and songlist
  53. ^ Eliseev has been identified by Leonid Mikhailovich Kharitonov, who sang with him.
  54. ^ VHS: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, "Listen".
  55. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, D1106: "Listen".
  56. ^ "Narod.ru". Songlist for Vasily Eliseev. http://kkre-25.narod.ru/eliseev.htm. Retrieved 2009-10-12.  
  57. ^ Important: Before editing this critical commentary, please read the section "Critical Commentaries" on the article discussion page.
  58. ^ a b CD: EMI: Soviet Army Chorus & Band, CDC-7-47833-2 DIDX-1015, "Bandura".
  59. ^ CD: EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4, "Bandura".
  60. ^ Translated Japanese website: Biography of S. Frolov.
  61. ^ Translated m-fradkin.narod.ru webpage: biog of Mark Fradkin who composed Song of the Dnieper
  62. ^ CD: The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "The Red Cavalry"
  63. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Biography of S. Frolov
  64. ^ Japanese Red Army webpage: biography of Gavva.
  65. ^ YouTube: Valery Gavva singing "Dark Eyes"
  66. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "Dark Eyes"
  67. ^ Japanese Red Army webpage: biography of Gavva.
  68. ^ His patronym is alternatively said to be Petrovich.
  69. ^ CD: EMI: Soviet Army Chorus & Band, CDC-7-47833-2 DIDX-1015, "Tipperary".
  70. ^ CD: EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4, "Tipperary".
  71. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Biography and songlist of KG Gerasimov
  72. ^ Japanese Red Army webpage: biography of Gluboky.
  73. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Vladimir Gorlanov
  74. ^ L.M. Kharitonov, who knew Gres, says this was 1950-1960.
  75. ^ Leonid Mikhailovich Kharitonov, who knew Gres, says this was 1964-1965.
  76. ^ Leonid Mikhailovich Kharitonov says he left the Ensemble ca.2003.
  77. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, D1106: "The Birch Tree".
  78. ^ Translated Japenese webpage: Nicholas Gres
  79. ^ . . . although this film was made by a German company filming in Russia.
  80. ^ Important: Please read the section "Critical Commentaries" on the article's discussion page before editing this commentary. Thank you.
  81. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "Smuglianka"
  82. ^ CD Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "The Samovars"
  83. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Sergei Ivanov
  84. ^ SILDV 7004, Live performance in Paris 16/17 December 2003. Dir: I. Jugashvili. Released 8th February 2005. See Alexandrov Ensemble discography for further information.
  85. ^ They have a strong fanbase in Japan, where people perform their songs in Red Army costume.
  86. ^ Important: please read the "Critical Commentary" section on the article's discussion page before editing this commentary. Thank you.
  87. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "Troika". NB: In Troika (dance) a man dances with two women, which may explain some of the humour in this song; i.e. the title could be taken to mean "threesome".
  88. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034 "Gandzia"
  89. ^ Possibly this is Ave Maria
  90. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Click on link to "Katerinsuki" = Vladimir Katerinsky
  91. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of L.M. Kharitonov.
  92. ^ VHS: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, "Volga Boatmen".
  93. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, D1106, "Volga Boatmen".
  94. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: biography and songlist of L.M. Kharitonov.
  95. ^ Japanese Red Army webpage: biography of Koslovsky.
  96. ^ Khrushchev, Nikita (2004), Khrushchev, Sergei, ed., Memoirs of Nikita Khrushchev, Volume 1: Commissar, The Pennsylvania State University Press, ISBN 0271023325
  97. ^ This could be identical with Shooting Kommunarov.
  98. ^ Japanese Red Army webpage: biography of Kusleev.
  99. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of Boris Kuznetsov (He could possibly be identical with I. Kuznetsov).
  100. ^ Translated Narod.ru webpage: biography of EM Labkovsky
  101. ^ Translated Narod.ru webpage: Biography of EM Labkovsky
  102. ^ Translated Life.ru webpage: news report on Labkovsky's illness.
  103. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Edward Labkovsky
  104. ^ Translated renatibragimov.ru webpage: biography of Labkovsky with incorrect birthdate.
  105. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of K. Lisovsky.
  106. ^ YouTube: Lisovskiy singing Rimsky-Korsakov, and biography.
  107. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "The Birch Tree"
  108. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of K. Lisovsky
  109. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of Alexei Martynov.
  110. ^ CD: The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "The Roads"
  111. ^ Armchairgeneral page: "Evening/Night in the Roadstead".
  112. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of Pavel Mihailov (could be identical with P. Mikhailov).
  113. ^ a b c Information from Leonid Kharitonov, soloist of the Alexandrov Ensemble.
  114. ^ He recorded Ich Freue Mich Ihnen Mein Lied Zu Singen in 1988, saying that it was 40 years after the 1948 peace concert in Berlin.
  115. ^ Another version says that he joined the Ensemble in 1935.
  116. ^ Article by Anatoly Kompaniets: "Even before th ewar he was singing extended overflights at the beginning of Kalinka." In Russian.
  117. ^ Translated sovmusic.ru webpage: song recorded by Nikitin, titled "Song krasnoflottsev".
  118. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge: Nikitin's Kalinka
  119. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: The Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble in Prague: "Winter Evening"
  120. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Boris Alexandrov Ensemble: "Winter Evening"
  121. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: The Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble in Prague: "Troika"
  122. ^ Armchairgeneral page with Samovary and Smuglanka
  123. ^ Translated Japanese webpage listing some of Nikitin's recordings.
  124. ^ List of vinyl recordings in Russian.
  125. ^ Sovmusic.ru: Comments section: Peter 7.11.07 23:07 relates the Nikitin story.
  126. ^ Translated vpk-news.ru webpage: interview with Ensemble Director Leonid Maleev, by Vadim UDMANTSEV, 2004: "Victor Nikitin sang . . . Germans stopped shooting".
  127. ^ Newspaper "Culture" April/May 200: Pastoral on the Ruins, by Anatoly Kompaniets In Russian.
  128. ^ Translated Discogs.com webpage: Auf gutem Weg Mit Guten Freunden.
  129. ^ Translated Rg.ru webpage: interview with Leonid Malev by Yadviga Yuferova, 2007
  130. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of baritone Georgi G. Pankov (probably not identical with v. Pankov).
  131. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "My Country".
  132. ^ CD: EMI: Soviet Army Chorus & Band, CDC-7-47833-2 DIDX-1015, "Ah Lovely Night".
  133. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Biography and songlist of V. Puchkov.
  134. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: list of 78rpm Melodia records made by G. Vinogradov
  135. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Oleg Razumovsky
  136. ^ translated umka.com.ua webpage: Razumovsky's Anno Domini CD.
  137. ^ Armchair general page: The Fond Stone.
  138. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "Song of the Volga Boatmen"
  139. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Vadim Ruslanov
  140. ^ CD: EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4, "Bandura".
  141. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Ivan Savchuk
  142. ^ CD: EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4, "Black Eyebrows".
  143. ^ Translated Tsutsu webpage re distinguished people from the Tambov Region
  144. ^ YouTube: Alexei Sergeev singing Stenka Razin
  145. ^ VHS: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, "Stenka Razin"
  146. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, D1106: "Stenka Razin".
  147. ^ Translations of song titles may be slightly inaccurate.
  148. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "Along Peterskaya"
  149. ^ CD: EMI: Soviet Army Chorus & Band, CDC-7-47833-2 DIDX-1015, "Along Peterskaya"
  150. ^ CD: EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4, "Along Peterskaya"
  151. ^ VHS: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, "Along Peterskaya"
  152. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, D1106, "Along Peterskaya".
  153. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir SILKD6034, "Ah Nastasia".
  154. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Alexei Sergeev
  155. ^ CD: EMI: Soviet Army Chorus & Band, CDC-7-47833-2 DIDX-1015, "Ukrainian Poem"
  156. ^ CD: EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4, "Ukrainian Poem"
  157. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, D1106: "Under the Elm, Under the Oak".
  158. ^ CD: EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4, "If I Had a Hammer"
  159. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Alexei Sergeev. NB: Many songtitles are duplicated in the article due to different translations from various sources.
  160. ^ YouTube: Boris Shapenko(?) sings Volga Boatmen
  161. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Boris Shapenko
  162. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Boris Shemyakov
  163. ^ Translated Japanese website: Vladimir Shkaptsov
  164. ^ CD: Silva Classics: The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "Kalinka".
  165. ^ Youtube: Shtefutsa singing Kalinka
  166. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "Korobelniki".
  167. ^ Japanese Red Army webpage: biography of Shtefutsa.
  168. ^ Leonid Mikhailovich Kharitonov, who knew him, says he was only half a year in the Ensemble.
  169. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: A.S. Sibirtsev
  170. ^ CD: Silva Classics, The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034, "Bella Ciao"
  171. ^ Slastnoi may have recorded Bella Ciao in 1966
  172. ^ Bank.gov.ua webpage: commemmorative coin celebrating Solovianenko 1999.
  173. ^ Olymp Travel Ltd: travel guide to Donetsk region.
  174. ^ Thecanadianencyclopedia.com re Ukrainian musical life in Canada.
  175. ^ Information from VHS packaging: see Alexandrov Ensemble discography page.
  176. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: Biography and discography of Solovyanenko.
  177. ^ YouTube: Barseg Tumanyan singing Granada
  178. ^ YouTube: Barseg Tumanyan sings "Toreador Song"
  179. ^ YouTube: Barseg Tumanyan's 50th anniversary
  180. ^ Translated Golos.am webpage: Interview with Barset Tumanyan 2007
  181. ^ Translated narod.ru webpage: biography of Alexei Usmanov
  182. ^ Translated grandi-tenori.com webpage: Biography of Vinogradov.
  183. ^ CD: Melodiya: Sacred War (in Russian), MELCD60-00938/1: "Two Maxims".
  184. ^ CD: Melodiya: Sacred War (in Russian), MELCD60-00938/1: "Oh the Road".
  185. ^ Armchairgeneral page: "Two Maxims;" "In a Forest at the Front;" "Nightingale;" "Dark Night".
  186. ^ YouTube: Vinogradov and Bunchikov sing "Nightingale"
  187. ^ The subject of this folk song may be the Lučina River in the Czech Republic.
  188. ^ YouTube: Vinogradov sings "The Bending Branch"
  189. ^ Translated kkre-22.narod.ru webpage: Biography of Vinogradov
  190. ^ Guildmusic.com reviews of Georgy Vinogradov
  191. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: biography of Georgy Vinogradov.
  192. ^ YouTube: Igor Volkov singing Black Eyes/Dark Eyes
  193. ^ I suspect his name is not "Wheat" but is a Russian name which means "wheat". Proper English version needed. There is a Cyrillic pronunciation guide here
  194. ^ A better translation of this songtitle is needed.
  195. ^ Japanese Red Army webpage: biography of Zhayvoronok.
  196. ^ Youtube: Lev Leshchenko singing Den Pobedy.
  197. ^ Ensemble-Aleksandrova: Biography of Boris Alexandrov
  198. ^ According to the Ensemble's official website, these five are not soloists, but are in the choir.

External links


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