BASF: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

BASF SE
Type Public (FWB: BAS, LSE: BFA)
Founded 1865
Headquarters Ludwigshafen, Germany
Key people Jürgen F. Strube (Chairman of the supervisory board), Jürgen Hambrecht (CEO and Chairman of the executive board)
Industry Chemicals, manufacturing, energy
Products Chemicals, plastics, performance chemicals, catalysts, coatings, crop technology, crude oil and natural gas exploration and production
Revenue 62.30 billion (2008)[1]
Operating income €6.463 billion (2008)[1]
Profit €2.912 billion (2008)[1]
Employees 96,900 (2008)[1]
Website www.basf.com

BASF SE (FWB: BAS, LSE: BFA) is a German chemical company and the largest chemical company in the world.[2] BASF originally stood for Badische Anilin- und Soda-Fabrik (Baden Aniline and Soda Factory). Today, the four letters are a registered trademark and the company is listed on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange, London Stock Exchange, and Zurich Stock Exchange. The company delisted its ADR from the New York Stock Exchange in September 2007.

The BASF Group comprises more than 160 subsidiaries and joint ventures and operates more than 150 production sites in Europe, Asia, Australia, Americas and Africa. Its headquarters are located in Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany). BASF has customers in over 200 countries and supplies products to a wide variety of industries. Despite its size and global presence BASF receives little public attention as it abandoned consumer product lines in the 90s.

At the end of 2008, the company employed more than 96,000 people, with over 47,000 in Germany alone. In 2008, BASF posted sales of €62 billion and income from operations before special items of over €6.8 billion. The company is currently expanding its international activities with a particular focus on Asia. Between 1990 and 2005, the company invested €5.6 billion in Asia, for example in sites near Nanjing and Shanghai, China and Katipalla in India.

Contents

History

BASF in Ludwigshafen

BASF was founded on 6 April 1865 Mannheim, Germany, by Friedrich Engelhorn. He had been responsible for setting up a gasworks and street lighting for the town council in 1861. The gasworks produced tar as a byproduct, and Engelhorn used this for the production of dyes. BASF was set up in 1865 to produce other chemicals necessary for dye production, notably soda and acids. The plant, however, was erected on the other side of the Rhine river at Ludwigshafen because the town council of Mannheim was afraid that the air pollution of the chemical plant could bother the inhabitants of the town. In 1866 the dye production processes were also moved to the BASF site.[3]

Advertisements

Dyes

The discovery in 1856 by William Henry Perkin that aniline could be used to make intense colouring agents had led to the commercial production of synthetic dyes in England from aniline extracted from coal tar. BASF recruited Heinrich Caro, a German chemist with experience of the dyestuffs industry in England. Caro developed a synthesis for alizarin (a natural pigment in madder), and applied for a British patent on 25 June 1869. Coincidentally Perkin applied for a virtually identical patent on 26 June 1869, and the two companies came to a mutual commercial agreement about the process.[3]

Further patents were granted for the synthesis of methylene blue and eosin, and in 1880 research began to try to find a synthetic process for indigo dye, though this was not successfully brought to the market till 1897. In 1901 some 80% of the BASF production was dyestuffs.[3]

Soda

Sodium carbonate (soda) was produced by the Leblanc process until 1880, when the much cheaper Solvay process became available. BASF ceased to make its own and bought it from the Solvay company thereafter.[3]

Sulfuric Acid

Sulfuric acid was initially produced by the Lead chamber process, but in 1890 a unit using the Contact process was brought on stream, producing the acid at higher concentration (98% instead of 80%) and at lower cost. This followed extensive research and development by Rudolf Knietsch, for which he received the Liebig Medal in 1904.[3]

Ammonia

The development of the Haber process from 1908 to 1912 made it possible to synthesize ammonia (commonly used in chemical and pyrotechnic warfare as well as some fertilizers), and in 1913 BASF started a new production plant in Oppau, adding fertilizers to its product range. BASF also acquired and began mining anhydrite for gypsum at the Kohnstein in 1917.[4].

IG Farben

As a result of this monopoly, BASF was able to start operations at a new site in Leuna in 1916, where explosives were produced during the First World War. On September 21, 1921, an explosion occurred in Oppau, killing 565 people. This was the biggest catastrophe in German industry (see Oppau explosion). Under the leadership of Carl Bosch, BASF founded IG Farben with Hoechst, Bayer, and three other companies, thus losing its independence. BASF was the nominal survivor, as all shares were exchanged for BASF shares prior to the merger. Rubber, fuels, and coatings were added to the product range. Following the appointment of Adolf Hitler as Chancellor in 1933, IG Farben cooperated with the Nazi regime, profiting from guaranteed volumes and prices, and from the slave labor provided by the government's concentration camps. IG Farben also achieved notoriety owing to its production of Zyklon-B, the lethal gas used in Nazi extermination camps. In 1935, IG Farben and AEG presented the magnetophone – the first tape recorder – at the Radio Exhibition in Berlin.[5]

BASF Portsmouth Site in the West Norfolk area of Portsmouth, Virginia. The plant is served by the Commonwealth Railway.

World War II

The Ludwigshafen site was almost completely destroyed during the Second World War and was subsequently rebuilt. The allies dissolved IG Farben in November 1945.

BASF refounded

On July 28 1948, an explosion in which 207 people died occurred in Ludwigshafen. In 1952, BASF was refounded under its own name. With the German economic miracle in the 1950s, BASF added synthetics such as nylon to its product range. BASF developed polystyrene in the 1930s and invented Styropor in 1951.

Production abroad

In the 1960s, production abroad was expanded and plants were built in Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, France, United Kingdom, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Spain and the United States. Following a change in corporate strategy in 1965, greater emphasis was placed on higher-value products such as coatings, pharmaceuticals, crop protection agents and fertilizers. Following the reunification of Germany, BASF acquired a site in Schwarzheide, eastern Germany, on October 25 1990.

Takeovers

On May 30, 2006, BASF bought the Engelhard Corporation for 4.8 billion USD. This takeover is the largest takeover in the company's history. BASF is now the world's largest manufacturer of catalytic converters.

Other acquisitions in 2006 were the purchase of Johnson Polymer and the construction chemicals business of Degussa.

The acquisition of Johnson Polymer was completed on July 1, 2006. The purchase price was $470 million on a cash and debt-free basis. It provides BASF with a range of water-based resins that complements its portfolio of high solids and UV resins for the coatings and paints industry and will strengthen the company’s market presence, in particular in North America.

Also on July 1, 2006 the acquisition of the construction chemicals business of Degussa AG was completed. The purchase price for equity was just under €2.2 billion. In addition, the transaction was associated with debt of €0.5 billion.

The company agreed to acquire Ciba (formerly part of Ciba-Geigy) in September 2008.[6] The proposed deal is currently under review by the European Commissioner for Competition, with a decision expected on 12 March 2009.[7]

On December 19, 2008, BASF acquired U.S.-based Whitmire Micro-Gen together with U.K.-based Sorex Ltd, Widnes, Great Britain.[8] Sorex is a manufacturer of branded chemical and non-chemical products for professional pest management. In March 2007 Sorex was put up for sale with a price tag of about 100 million pounds.[9]

Genetically modified organisms

Anti-biotechnology protest groups have criticized BASF's plans to hold trials of GMO potatoes in the UK.[10]

Business segments

BASF building
BASF headquarters, Ludwigshafen, Germany

BASF operates in a variety of markets. Its business is organized in the segments Chemicals, Plastics, Performance Products, Functional Solutions, Agricultural Solutions and Oil & Gas. The company occasionally advertises to the public using the tagline "At BASF, we don't make a lot of the products you buy. We make a lot of the products you buy better." Its slogan is "BASF The Chemical Company".

Chemicals

BASF produces a wide range of chemicals, for example solvents, amines, resins, glues, electronic-grade chemicals, industrial gases, basic petrochemicals and inorganic chemicals. The most important customers for this segment are the pharmaceutical, construction, textile and automotive industries.

Plastics

BASF offers a comprehensive product line and market expertise ranging from commodities to engineering and high-performance materials in thermoplastics, foams and urethanes.[11]

1. Engineering Plastics
BASF's Engineering Plastics consists of the "4 Ultras" - Ultramid polyamide (PA) nylon-based resins, Ultradur, polybutylene tererphthalate (PBT), Ultraform, polyacetal (POM), and Ultrason,polysulfone (PSU) and polyether sulfone (PES).

2. Styrenics
BASF Styrenics consists of the Foams and Copolymers. BASF's styrenic copolymers have applications in electronics, building and construction, and automotive components.

3. Polyurethanes
BASF's Polyurethanes business consists of diverse technologies and finished products. Urethane chemicals are raw materials used in rigid and flexible foams commonly used for insulation in the construction and appliance industries, furniture, packaging and transportation.

4. Foams
Foams like Styropor are generally used as insulating materials. They are eco-efficient and offer advantages over other materials in terms of cost-effectiveness, preservation of resources and environmental protection. Investments made for insulating materials usually pay for themselves within a short time and contribute to retaining and even enhancing the value of buildings.

5. Polyamides and Intermediates
BASF is a manufacturer of polyamide precursors and polyamide. BASF offer polyamide 6 and polyamide 6,6 polymers as well as precursors.

6. Biodegradable Plastics
BASF was a pioneer in manufacturing and developing biodegradable plastic, namely, Ecoflex. Ecovio, consists of Ecoflex and a high content of polylactic acid.

Performance products

BASF produces a range of performance chemicals, coatings and functional polymers. These include raw materials for detergents, textile and leather chemicals, pigments and raw materials for adhesives. Customers are the automotive, oil, paper, packaging, textile, sanitary products, detergents, construction materials, coatings, printing and leather industries.

Functional chemicals

BASF Cosmetic Solutions specializes in chemicals that many name brand skin care companies worldwide use to formulate their own products. Chemical types such as but not limited to: emulsifiers, solubilizers, anionic surfactants, glycol polymers, colorants, styling polymers, hair setting resins, conditioning agents, thickening polymers, emollients and UV absorbers.

Agricultural

BASF's crop protection division is a supplier of agricultural products and chemicals for agriculture. In the field of plant biotechnology, BASF is concentrating on solutions for effective agriculture, healthier nutrition and plants to make products more efficiently. Products from this segment include fungicides, herbicides and insecticides. Their major products include F500 (pyraclostrobin), epoxiconazole, pendimethalin, boscalid, fipronil, seed treatment products and the Clearfield Production System.[12] Recently, the company has diverted their research interests to Nutrigenomics to tailor the social responsibility of public health [13].

Oil and gas

BASF explores for and produces oil and gas through its subsidiary Wintershall Holding AG. In Central and Eastern Europe, Wintershall works with its Russian partner Gazprom.

Investors

72% of the BASF shares are held by institutional investors (AXA SA more than 5%, Allianz AG 2.6% and General Capital Group 2.1%). 45% of the shares are held in Germany, 17.3% in the UK and 13.5 % in the U.S.

Production

BASF's recent success is characterized by a focus on creating resource efficient product lines after completely abandoning consumer products. This strategy was reflected in production by a re-focus towards integrated production sites. The largest such integrated production site is located in Ludwigshafen employing 33,000 people. Integrated production sites are characterized by co-location of a large number of individual production lines (producing a specific chemical), which share an interconnected material flow. Piping is used ubiquitously for volume materials. All production lines use common raw material sourcing and feed back waste resources, which can be used elsewhere (e.g. steam of various temperatures, sulfuric acid, carbon monoxide). The economic incentive for this approach is high resource and energy efficiency of the overall process, reduced shipping cost and associated reduced risk of accidents. Due to the high cost of such an integrated production site it establishes a high entry barrier for competitors trying to enter the market for volume chemicals.

Environmental record

In 2006 BASF was praised by the Climate Leadership Index for their efforts in problems with climate change and greenhouse gasses in our world. In recent years the BASF Company has set aside a large portion of their R&D budget on resource conservation.[14]

BASF has reported that one of their recent developments has been creating filters for wastewater treatments plants that help to reduce emissions.[15].

Another recent environmental move the BASF Company has done is formed a partnership with Columbia University. The BASF Company and Columbia University came together so that they can further research “environmentally benign and sustainable energy sources”.[16] The company has recently reported their emissions in 2006 to be “1.50 million metric tons of waste.” Even though it is a lot of waste, BASF has shown improvement in that they have steadily reduced their waste emissions in the last few years.[15]

Chromium spill from BASF plant in Hannibal

In May of 2009, accidental discharge of chromium from BASF Plant in Hannibal, Louisiana into the Mississippi-river reportedly contaminated the drinking water. The local Department of Natural Resources did not react at the time to test the chromium levels, but later tests in December 2009 showed the chromium levels did not exceed regulatory safety limits.[17]

Subsequently, BASF worked with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) to resolve questions regarding the elevated level of hexavalent chromium that was detected in the effluent from one of its permitted outfalls into the Mississippi River. The company notified MoDNR about the elevated level and collected tandem water samples for testing. The state department of health was also notified and upon reviewing the test results determined that the very small amounts found were well below recommended public health screening levels.[18]

Cooperation with Monsanto

BASF is cooperating with Monsanto Company in research, development and marketing of biotechnology.[19]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Annual Results 2008". BASF. http://berichte.basf.de/basfir/copsfiles/en/2008/pk-bericht/14578_BASF_BPK-Report_08.pdf?suffix=.pdf. Retrieved 2009-03-06. 
  2. ^ BASF SE information and related industry information from Hoover's United Kingdom (UK)
  3. ^ a b c d e W. Ludewig (1966) Trans Inst Chem Engrs vol 44 ppT237-252 "Highlights in the History of BASF"
  4. ^ Ordway, Frederick I, III; Sharpe, Mitchell R (1979). The Rocket Team. Apogee Books Space Series 36. pp. 75,76,79,88. 
  5. ^ "IG Farben to be dissolved". BBC News - Business (BBC News). September 17, 2001. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/1549092.stm. Retrieved 2008-05-09. 
  6. ^ Kuehnen, Eva (15 September 2008). "BASF bids $3 bln for Switzerland's Ciba". Reuters. http://uk.reuters.com/article/innovationNews/idUKLF63993220080915. Retrieved 2008-09-15. 
  7. ^ "EU mergers and takeovers (March 6)". Reuters. 6 March 2009. http://www.reuters.com/article/rbssIndustryMaterialsUtilitiesNews/idUSPRWP1420090306?sp=true. Retrieved 2009-03-06. 
  8. ^ "BASF finalizes acquisition of Sorex pest control business". BASF. 22 December 2008. http://www.agro.basf.com/agr/AP-Internet/en/content/news_room/news/P-08-539. Retrieved 2009-10-02. 
  9. ^ "Reuters Press Digest: British business press". Reuters. 18 March 2007. http://www.reuters.com/article/companyNewsAndPR/idUSL1827372620070318?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=0. Retrieved 2009-10-02. 
  10. ^ [1]
  11. ^ BASF Plastics Portal - Global Homepage
  12. ^ "Major Products: Welcome to BASF Crop Protection". http://www.agro.basf.com/agr/AP-Internet/en/content/solutions/index. 
  13. ^ GeneWatch UK. "Your Diet Tailored to Your Genes: Preventing Diseases or Misleading Marketing?" (PDF). http://www.genewatch.org/uploads/f03c6d66a9b354535738483c1c3d49e4/Nutrigenomics.pdf. Retrieved 9 May 2008. 
  14. ^ BASF's environmental efforts recognized :: evertiq.com
  15. ^ a b BASF Group: Efficient processes for Companies and the environment
  16. ^ BASF and Columbia University Forms Partnership
  17. ^ New tests find higher level of chemical, Kim McGuire and Tony Messenger, ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, 01/08/2010, stltoday.com
  18. ^ Henley, Danny (February 12, 2010). "BPW: Chromium-6 findings require no water treatment changes". Hannibal Courier-Post. Retrieved on March 9, 2010.
  19. ^ BASF-Gruppe: Interview Dr. Jürgen Hambrecht zur Zusammenarbeit mit Monsanto

External links

Coordinates: 49°29′47″N 8°25′57″E / 49.49639°N 8.4325°E / 49.49639; 8.4325


Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

Birmingham Amended Statement of Faith
by Christadelphians, The
Information about this edition
Wikipedia logo Wikipedia has more on:
Christadelphians.
The Birmingham Amended Statement of Faith (BASF) is the most widely accepted Christadelphian Statement of Faith and comes in two parts. This section is called 'truth to be recieved' and another section is called 'doctrines to be rejected.

See also the Doctrines to be Rejected in the Birmingham Amended Statement of Faith and The Commandments of Christ.


THE FOUNDATION -- That the book currently known as the Bible, consisting of the Scriptures of Moses, the prophets, and the apostles, is the only source of knowledge concerning God and His purposes at present extant or available in the earth, and that the same were wholly given by inspiration of God in the writers, and are consequently without error in all parts of them, except such as may be due to errors of transcription or translation. (This paragraph was added in 1886.)


References

2 Tim. 3:16; 1 Cor. 2:13; Heb. 1:1; 2 Pet. 1:21; 1 Cor. 14:37; Neh. 9:30; John 10:35.


1. That the only true God is He Who was revealed to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, by angelic visitation and vision, and to Moses at the flaming bush (unconsumed) and at Sinai, and Who manifested Himself in the Lord Jesus Christ, as the supreme self-existent Deity, the ONE FATHER, dwelling in unapproachable light, yet everywhere present by His Spirit, which is a unity with His person in heaven. He hath, out of His own underived energy, created heaven and earth, and all that in them is.

References

Isa. 40:13-25; 43:10-12; 44:6-8; 45:5; 46:9-10; Job 38-40; Deut. 6:1-4; Mark 12:29-32; 1 Cor. 8:4-6; Eph. 4:6; 1 Tim. 2:5; Neh. 9:6; Job 26:13; Psa. 124:8; 146:6; 148:5; Isa. 40:25-27; Jer. 10:12-13; 27:5; 32:17-25; 51:15; Acts 14:15; 17:24; 1 Chron. 29:11-14; Psa. 62:11; 145:3; Isa. 26:4; 40:26; Job 9:4; 36:5; Psa. 92:5; 104:24; 147:4-5; Isa. 28:29; Rom. 16:27; 1 Tim. 1:17; 2 Chron. 16:9; Job 28:24; 34:21; Psa. 33:13-14; 44:21; 94:9; 139:7-12; Prov. 15:3; Jer. 23:24; 32:19; Amos 9:2-3; Acts 17:27-28; Psa. 123:1; 1 Kings 8:30-39, 43, 49; Matt. 6:9; 1 Tim. 6:15-16; 1:17.


2. That Jesus of Nazareth was the Son of God, begotten of the Virgin Mary by the Holy Spirit, without the intervention of man, and afterwards anointed with the same Spirit, without measure, at his baptism.

References:

Matt. 1 :23; 1 Tim. 3: 16; Acts 2:22-24, 36; Matt. 1:18-25; Lk. 1:26-35; Gal. 4:4; Isa. 7:14; Matt. 3:16-17; Isa. 11:2; 42:1; 61:1; John 3:34; 7:16; 8:26-28; 14:10-24.


3. That the appearance of Jesus of Nazareth on the earth was necessitated by the position and state into which the human race had been brought by the circumstances connected with the first man.

References:

1 Cor. 15:21-22; Rom. 5:12-19; Gen. 3:19; 2 Cor. 5:19-21.


4. That the first man was Adam, whom God created out of the dust of the ground as a living soul, or natural body of life, "very good" [Publisher's Note: Gen. 1:31] in kind and condition, and placed him under a law through which the continuance of life was contingent on obedience.

References:

Gen. 2:7; 18:27; Job 4:19; 33:6; 1 Cor. 15:46-49; Gen. 2:17.


5. That Adam broke this law, and was adjudged unworthy of immortality, and sentenced to return to the ground from whence he was taken-a sentence which defiled and became a physical law of his being, and was transmitted to all his posterity, until the coming of Christ.

References:

Gen. 3:15-19, 22-23; 2 Cor. 1:9; Rom. 7:24; 2 Cor. 5:2-4; Rom. 7:18-23; Gal. 5:16-17; Rom. 6:12; 7:21; John 3:6; Rom. 5:12; 1 Cor. 15:22; Psa. 51:5; Job 14:4; Matt. 25:46.


6. That God, in His kindness, conceived a plan of restoration which, without setting aside His just and necessary law of sin and death, should ultimately rescue the race from destruction, and people the earth with sinless immortals.

References:

Rev. 21 :4; John 3: 16; 2 Tim. 1: 10; 1 John 2:25; 2 Tim. 1: 1; Titus 1:2; Rom. 3:26; John 1:29.


7. That He inaugurated this plan by making promises to Adam, Abraham and David, and afterwards elaborated it in greater detail through the prophets.

References:

Gen. 3:15; 22:18; Psa. 89:34-37; 33:5; Hos. 13:14; Isa. 25:7-9; 51:1-8; Jer. 23:5.


8. That these promises had reference to Jesus Christ, who was to be raised up in the condemned line of Abraham and David, and who, though wearing their condemned nature, was to obtain a title to resurrection by perfect obedience, and, by dying, abrogate the law of condemnation for himself, and all who should believe and obey him.

References:

1 Cor. 15:45; Heb. 2:14-16; Rom. 1:3; Heb. 5:8-9; 1:9; Rom. 5:19-21; Gal. 4:4-5; Rom. 8:3-4; Heb. 2:15; 9:26; Gal. 1:4; Heb. 7:27; 5:3-7; 2:17; Rom. 6:10; 6:9; Acts 13:34-37; Rev. 1:18; John 5:21-22, 26-27; 14:3; Rev. 2:7; 3:21; Matt. 25:21; Heb. 5:9; Mark 16:16; Acts 13:38-39; Rom. 3:22; (Psa. 2:6-9; Dan. 7:13-14; Rev. 11:15; Jer. 23:5; Zech. 14:9; Eph. 1:9-10) -- [Publisher's Note: These passages in parathensis must be considered together.]


9. That it was this mission that necessitated the miraculous begettal of Christ of a human mother, enabling him to bear our condemnation, and, at the same time, to be a sinless bearer thereof, and, therefore, one who could rise after suffering the death required by the righteousness of God.

References:

Matt. 1:18-25; Luke 1:26-35; Isa. 7:14; Rom. 1:3-4; 8:3; Gal. 4:4; 2 Cor. 5:21; Heb. 2:14-17; 4:15.


10. That being so begotten of God, and inhabited and used by God through the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, Jesus was Emmanuel, God with us, God manifested in the flesh-yet was, during his natural life, of like nature with mortal man, being made of a woman of the house and lineage of David, and therefore a sufferer, in the days of his flesh, from all the effects that came by Adam's transgression including the death that passed upon all man, which he shared by partaking of their physical nature.

References:

Matt. 1:23; 1 Tim. 3:16; Heb. 2:14; Gal. 4:4; Heb. 2:17.


11. That the message he delivered from God to his kinsmen, the Jews, was a call to repentance from every evil work, the assertion of his divine sonship and Jewish kingship; and the proclamation of the glad tidings that God would restore their kingdom through him, and accomplish all things written in the prophets.

References:

Mark l:l5; Matt. 4:17; 5:20-48; John 10:36; 9:35; 11:27; 19:21; 1:49; Matt. 27:11-43; John 10:24-25; Matt. 19:28; 21:42-43; 23:38-39; 25:14-46; Luke 4:43; 13:27-30; 19:11-27; 22:28-30; Matt. 5:17; Luke 24:44.


12. That for delivering this message, he was put to death by the Jews and Romans who were, however, but instruments in the hands of God, for the doing of that which He had determined before to be done-namely, the condemnation of sin in the flesh, through the offering of the body of Jesus once for all, as a propitiation to declare the righteousness of God, as a basis for the remission of sins. All who approach God through this crucified, but risen, representative of Adam's disobedient race, are forgiven. Therefore, by a figure, his blood cleanseth from sin.

References:

Luke 19:47; 20:1-26; John 11:45-53; Acts 10:38-39; 13:26-29; 4:27-28; Rom. 8:3; Heb. 10:10; Rom. 3:25; Acts 13:38; 1 John 1:7; John 14:6; Acts 4:12; 1 Pet. 3:18; 2:24; Heb. 9:14; 7:27; 9:26-28; Gal. 1:4; Rom. 3:25; 15:8; Gal. 3:21-22; Gal. 2:21; 4:4-5; Heb. 9:15; Luke 22:20; 24:26, 46-47; Matt. 26:28.


13. That on the third day, God raised him from the dead, and exalted him to the heavens as priestly mediator between God and man, in the process of gathering from among them a people who should be saved by the belief and obedience of the Truth.

References:

1 Cor. 15:4; Acts 10:40; 13:30-37; 2:24-27; 4:27-33; [Publisher's Note: The following passages were removed from Clause 14, where they were wrongfully placed:] Luke 24:51; Eph. 1:20; Acts 5:31; 1 Tim. 2:5; Heb. 8:1; Acts 15:14; 13:39; Heb. 4:14-15.


14. That he is a priest over his own house only, and does not intercede for the world, or for professors who are abandoned to disobedience. That he makes intercession for his erring brethren, if they confess and forsake their sins.

References:

Luke 24:51; Eph. 1:20; Acts 5:31; 1 Tim. 2:5; Heb. 8: 1; Acts 15:14; 13:39; Heb. 4:14-l5.


15. That he sent forth apostles to proclaim salvation through him, as the only Name given under heaven whereby men may be saved.

References:

Acts 1:8; Matt. 28:19-20; Luke 24:46-48; Acts 26:16-18; 4:12.


16. That the way to obtain this salvation is to believe the Gospel they preached, and to take on the Name and service of Christ, by being thereupon immersed in water, and continuing patiently in the observance of all things he has commanded, none being recognized as his friends except those who do what he has commanded.

References:

Acts 13:48; 16:31; Mark 16:16; Rom. 1:16; Acts 2:38, 41; 10:47-48; 8:12; Gal. 3:27-29; Rom. 6:3-5; 2:7; Matt. 28:20; John 15:14.


17. That the Gospel consists of "The things concerning the Kingdom of God and the Name of Jesus Christ."

References:

Acts 8:12; 19:8, 10, 20; 28:30-31.


18. That the "Things of the Kingdom of God" are the facts testified concerning the Kingdom of God in the writings of the prophets and apostles, and definable as in the next 12 paragraphs.


19. That God will set up a Kingdom in the earth, which will overthrow all others, and change them into "the kingdoms of our Lord and His Christ."

References:

Dan. 2:44; 7:13-14; Rev. 11:15; Isa. 32:1, 16; 2:3-4; 11:9-10.


20. That for this purpose God will send Jesus Christ personally to the earth at the close of the times of the Gentiles.

References:

Acts 3:20-21; Psa. 102:16, 21; 2 Tim. 4:1, Acts 1:9, 11; Dan. 7:13 [Publisher's Note: Additional passages: Luke 21:24-27; Rom. 11:25-26].


21. That the Kingdom which he will establish will be the Kingdom of Israel restored, in the territory it formerly occupied, namely, the land bequeathed for an everlasting possession to Abraham and his Seed (the Christ) by covenant.

References:

Mic. 4:6-8; Amos 9:11, 15; Eze. 37:21-22; Jer. 23:3, 8; Gen. 13: 14-17; Heb. 11:8-9; Gal. 3: 16; Lev. 26:42; Mic. 7:20.


22. That this restoration of the Kingdom again to Israel will involve the ingathering of God's chosen but scattered nation, the Jews; their reinstatement in the land of their fathers, when it shall have been reclaimed from "the desolation of many generations"; the building again of Jerusalem to become "the throne of the Lord" and the metropolis of the whole earth.

References:

Isa. 11:12; Jer. 31:10; Zec. 8:8; Eze. 36:34-36; Isa. 5l:3; 60:15; 62:4; Jer. 3: 17; Mic. 4:7-8; Joel 3: 17; Isa. 24:23.


23. That the governing body of the Kingdom so established will be the brethren of Christ, of all generations, developed by resurrection and change, and constituting, with Christ as their head, the collective "Seed of Abraham," in whom all nations will be blessed, and comprising "Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets," and all in their age of like faithfulness.

References:

Dan. 12:2; Luke 13:28; Rev. 11:18; 1 Thess. 4:15-17; John 5:28-29; 6:39-40; Luke 14:14; Matt. 25:34, 46 [Publisher's Note: additional passages: Rev. 5:9-10; Dan. 7:27].


24. That at the appearing of Christ prior to the establishment of the Kingdom, the responsible (namely, those who know the revealed will of God, and have been called upon to submit to it), dead and living -- obedient and disobedient -- will be summoned before his judgment seat "to be judged according to their works," and "receive in body according to what they have done, whether it be good or bad."

References:

2 Cor. 5:10; 2 Tim. 4:1; Rom. 2:5-6, 16; 14:10-12; 1 Cor. 4:5; Rev. 11:18.

Note: Clause 24 was amended in Jan. 1898, to refute the teaching that one may avoid being raised for judgment by refusing baptism. With this change, this document came to be known as the Birmingham Amended Statement of Faith (BASF). While nearly all Christadelphian ecclesias worldwide have adopted this amended statement of faith, a few ecclesias in North America still use the original Birmingham Statement of Faith (BSF) which has also been called "Unamended" or BUSF. This clause in the original document reads "... the responsible will be summoned before his judgement seat ..."


25. That the unfaithful will be consigned to shame and "the second death," and the faithful, invested with immortality, and exalted to reign with Jesus as joint heirs of the Kingdom, co-possessors of the earth, and joint administrators of God's authority among men in everything.

References:

Matt. 7:26; 8:12; 25:20-30; Dan. 12:2; Gal. 6:8; 5:21; 2 Thess. 1:8; Heb. 10:26-31; 2 Pet. 2:12; Rev. 21:8; Mal. 4:1; Psa. 37:30-38; Prov. 10:25-29; 1 Cor. 15:51-55; 2 Cor. 5:1-4; James 1:12; Rom. 2:7; John 10:28; Matt. 5:5; Psa. 37:9, 22, 29; Rev. 5:9; Dan. 7:27; 1 Thess. 2:12; 2 Pet. 1:11; Rev. 3:21; 2 Tim. 2: 12; Rev. 5: 10; Psa. 49:7-9; Luke 22:29-30.


26. That the Kingdom of God, thus constituted, will continue a thousand years, during which sin and death will continue among the earth's subject inhabitants, though in a much milder degree than now.

References:

Rev. 20:4-9; 11:15; Isa. 65:20; Eze. 44:22, 25; 1 Cor. 15:24-28.


27. That a law will be established which shall go forth to the nations for their "instruction in righteousness," resulting in the abolition of war to the ends of the earth, and the "filling of the earth with the knowledge of the glory of Yahweh as the waters cover the sea."

References:

Mic. 4:2; Isa. 42:4; 11: 1-10; 2:4; Hab. 2:14.


28. That the mission of the Kingdom will be to subdue all enemies, and finally death itself, by opening up the way of life to the nations, which they will enter by faith, during the thousand years, and (in reality) at their close.

References:

1 Cor. 15:24-28; Rev. 21:4; 20:12-15; Isa. 25:6-8.


29. That at the close of the thousand years, there will be a general resurrection and judgment, resulting in the final extinction of the wicked, and the immortalization of those who shall have established their title (under the grace of God) to eternal life during the thousand years.

References:

Rev. 20:11-15; 1 Cor. 15:24.


30. That the government will then be delivered up by Jesus to the Father, Who will manifest Himself as the "All-in-All"; sin and death having been taken out of the way, and the race completely restored to the friendship of the Deity.

References:

1 Cor. 15:28.


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message