The Full Wiki

More info on Ballechin House

Ballechin House: Wikis

  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ballechin House was a Georgian estate home near Grandtully, Perthshire, Scotland. It was built in 1806, on the site of an old manor house which had been owned by the Stuart family since the 15th century. The Stuart family are an illegitimate branch of the royal house of Stewart, descending from a son of King James II.

Ballechin House was known as "The Most Haunted House in Scotland", with several similarities to the Borley Rectory haunting, including the apparition of a ghostly nun. Ballechin House was rented for a period by investigators from the Society for Psychical Research. In 1899, The Alleged Haunting of B---- House was published, and serialised in the London Times, containing a journal kept of the phenomena. John marquess of Bute was one of the guest that stayed at Ballechin during these investigations, and is quoted as saying" he could not understand how such a handsome house could have so wicked of a reputation".

Ballechin House was uninhabited by 1932, and most of the house was demolished in 1963, after a fire, leaving only the former servants quarters and outbuildings. The loss of Ballechin House was considered great, as many of its state rooms were considered some of the finest in Perthshire. Also lost was art work and furniture which had been collected by generations of the Stuart family, including many pieces from the far east, probably due to successive lairds' involvement in the British East India Company.

Local rumours have persisted in the region of a lost son and heir of John Stuart, who according to local lore was born out of wedlock to a domestic on the estate. Different versions of this tale have this son sent to Canada or Australia, or not surviving into adult hood.

References

External links

Coordinates: 56°39′42.14″N 3°44′18.61″W / 56.6617056°N 3.7385028°W / 56.6617056; -3.7385028


Ballechin House was a Georgian estate home near Grandtully, Perthshire, Scotland. It was built in 1806, on the site of an old manor house which had been owned by the Stuart family since the 15th century. The Stuart family are an illegitimate branch of the royal house of Stewart, descending from a son of King James II.[citation needed]

Ballechin House was known as "The Most Haunted House in Scotland",[citation needed] with several similarities to the Borley Rectory haunting, including the apparition of a ghostly nun. Ballechin House was rented for a period by investigators from the Society for Psychical Research. In 1899, The Alleged Haunting of B---- House was published, and serialised in the London Times, containing a journal kept of the phenomena. John marquess of Bute was one of the guest that stayed at Ballechin during these investigations, and is quoted as saying" he could not understand how such a handsome house could have so wicked of a reputation".

Ballechin House was uninhabited by 1932, and most of the house was demolished in 1963, after a fire, leaving only the former servants quarters and outbuildings. The loss of Ballechin House was considered great, as many of its state rooms were considered some of the finest in Perthshire.[citation needed] Also lost was art work and furniture which had been collected by generations of the Stuart family, including many pieces from the far east, probably due to successive lairds' involvement in the British East India Company.

Local rumours have persisted in the region of a lost son and heir of John Stuart, who according to local lore was born out of wedlock to a domestic on the estate. Different versions of this tale have this son sent to Canada or Australia, or not surviving into adult hood.[citation needed]

References

External links

Coordinates: 56°39′42.14″N 3°44′18.61″W / 56.6617056°N 3.7385028°W / 56.6617056; -3.7385028








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message