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Bismillahir Rahmanir Rahim

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Sunni Islam

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أهل السنة والجماعة‎


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Schools of Law (Shariah)

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Schools of Theology

AthariMaturidiAsh'ari


Hadith Collections

Sahih al-BukhariSahih Muslim
Al-Sunan al-Sughra
Sunan Abu Dawood
Sunan al-Tirmidhi
Sunan ibn MajaAl-Muwatta
Sunan al-Darami

Barelvi (Hindi: बरेलवी, Urdu: بریلوی, /bəreːlviː/) is a movement of Sunni Islam originating in the Indian subcontinent. The Barelvi movement was started in 1880 to promote South Asia's distinctive Islamic practices, which are deeply influenced by Sufism.[1] The movement in British India was greatly shaped by the writings of Ahmad Riza Khan (1856-1921),[2] thus the movement takes its name from Khan's home city of Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh, India.[3]

In India, the Grand Mufti is traditionally from the Barelvi school of Sunni Islam.

Contents

Etymology

The movement is known to its followers as Ahle Sunnat ("People of the traditions of Mohammed"), differentiating it from Deobandi, Ahle Hadith and Nadwa movements.[2] However, the term Ahle Sunnat is also used by Sunnis in general, many of whom do not recognise an exclusive claim to the term by the Barelvi movement. The term Barelvi is also used pejoratively by some orthodox Islamic groups which disapprove of the Barelvi's adherence to heterodox practices, many of which are derived from Sufism.[2] The name is also variously spelled as Barelwi, Barelavi, or Bareillwi.

Presence

India Today estimates that the majority of Muslims in India adhere to the Barelvi movement,[4] and The Times (London) writes that a majority of Muslims in the United Kingdom adhere to the movement as well.[5] Similarly, the conservative think tank The Heritage Foundation gives such estimates for the majority of Muslims in Pakistan.[1]

Beliefs

Like other Muslims, Barelvis base their beliefs on the Quran and Sunnah, and believe in monotheism and the prophethood of Muhammad. Barelvis follow the Ashari and Maturidi schools of aqidah, the Hanafi school of fiqh, and the Qadri, Chishti, Naqshbandi or Suhrawardi Sufi orders.

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Distinctive beliefs

Missionary activities

Barelvis have expanded their missionary activities in various countries of Asia, Europe, North America and South Africa through an organization named Ahle Sunnah-wa-Al-Jamaah (ASW

Relations with other Islamic movements

The major opposition to the Barelvis in the Indian subcontinent come from another Sunni school of Islam called the Deobandis, who claim to follow a more puritanical version of Islam and forbid special reverence to the Sufi saints and even to the prophet Muhammad, because they fear that this could lead to polytheism (shirk). The Salafi and Wahhabi movements has also been condemned by the Barelvis as extremist and misled.

Ahmad Raza Khan issued fatwas of takfir against the founders of the Deobandi sect, Wahabism , Shia Islam and Qadianism. Commenting on this, historian Usha Sanyal in her research entitled, Devotional Islam and Politics in British India: Ahmad Raza Khan Barelwi and His Movement, 1870-1920 stated:

Not only did Ahmad Raza Khan obtain confirmatory signatures from other scholars in the subcontinent, he managed to get agreement from a number of prominent ulama in Mecca. That occurred in the first years of the twentieth century--long before the Al-Saud and their Wahhabi allies got control of the Haramayn. The feat was, nevertheless, stunning. The antipathy of the Deobandis toward the Ahl-i Sunnah on the emotional level becomes more comprehensible when Ahmad Riza's fatwa receives a full explication.[6]

Opposition to the Taliban

The Barelwi movement of South Asia have taken a stance against Taliban movements in South Asia, organising rallies and protests in India and Pakistan, condemning what they perceive as unjustified sectarian violence.[7] The Sunni United Council (SUC),an amalgamation of eight Sunni organizations, launched the Save Pakistan Movement to stem the process of Talibanisation. Terming the Taliban a product of global anti-Islam conspiracies, the leaders of SUC charged it with playing into the hands of the United States to divide Muslims and bring a bad name to Islam.[8]

Supporting this movement, the foreign minister of Pakistan Shah Mahmood Qureshi, said:

The Sunni Tehreek has decided to activate itself against Talibanisation in the country. A national consensus against terrorism is emerging across the country.[9]

Sectarian Violence

In the 1990s and 2000s, sporadic violence resulted from disputes over control of Pakistani mosques between Barelwi and Deobandi and Salafi groups.[10] In May 2001, sectarian riots broke out after Sunni Tehreek leader Saleem Qadri was assassinated by the Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan, a Deoband-affiliated terrorist group.[11] In April 2007, Sunni Tehreek activists attempted to forcibly gain control of a mosque in Karachi, opening fire on the mosque and those inside, resulting in one death and three injuries.[12]

Notable scholars

Early scholars

Present scholars

Notable organizations

Main Institutions

See also

References

External links

http://www.minhaj.org


Part of a series on
Sunni Islam

Beliefs

Monotheism
Prophethood & Messengership
Holy Books • Angels
Judgement Day • Predestination

Pillars

Declaration of FaithPrayer
Charity • FastingPilgrimage

Rightly Guided Caliphs

Abu BakrUmar ibn al-Khattab
Uthman ibn Affan • Ali ibn Abi Talib

Schools of Law (Shariah)

HanafiShafi`iMalikiHanbali

Schools of Theology

MaturidiAsh'ariAthari

Modern Movements

DeobandiBarelwiSalafi

Hadith Collections

Sahih Bukhari • Sahih Muslim
Al-Sunan al-Sughra
Sunan Abu Dawood
Sunan al-Tirmidhi
Sunan ibn MajaAl-Muwatta
Sunan al-Darami

Barelwi (Urdu: Template:Nastaliq or Barelvi) in South Asia are Sunni Hanafi or Ahle Sunnat wal Jamaat also is a liberal Sufi influenced Sunni movement that was founded by Maulana Ahmed Raza Khan of Bareilly, Rohilkhand, India (hence the term Barelvi). Barelvis are a portion of the Hanafi Muslim communities in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, South Africa and the United Kingdom, besides having a presence in other places around the world. In South Asia Sunnis call themselves Barelwi to distinguish themselves from other denominations Wahabi/Salafi/Deobandi.

Imam Ahmad Raza Khan was the central figure around which the movement was promoted in the South Asia between the 19th and 20th centuries, earning followers and opponents. The name Barelvi came into use to identify the Sunnis. The terms Nuri and Barkati refer to the Sufi Tariqa associated with Maulana Ahmed Raza Khan. The term "razavi" refers to those people who have been initiated into the Qadri Sufi Tariqa via the lineage of Maulana Ahmed Raza Khan. Followers of Imam Ahmad Raza Khan in India are mainly Hanafi by Madhab (School of jurisprudence), but accept the other three Sunni schools to be true and valid.

Contents

Beliefs

Aqidah

Barelwi follow the Maturidi schools of Aqidah, the Hanafi school of Fiqh, and one of the Qadiri, Chisti, Naqshbandi or Suhrawardi Sufi orders.

According to Barelvi belief, the holy prophet Muhammad (s) had "knowledge of the unseen" and of the deeds of all Muslims, and also had been given knowledge of all creations by Allah. Along with being a Bashar or Human, he is also believed to be a Noor or "light".

Practices

During Mawlid (the birthday of Muhammad) special recitations (Naats) that have been written by scholars such as Ahmed Raza Khan are recited. The salat o salam with Durood and Hamd o Naat is recited after Fajr and Jumuah prayers. The Miraj, Shaberat or Shab-e-Barat, Laylat al-Qadr and Gyarvi Sharif of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jilani is celebrated.

Missionary activities

Barelvis have expanded their missionary activities in various countries of Asia, Europe, North America and South Africa through the organization Dawat-e-Islami, which was founded by Maulana Abu Bilal Attar Qadri Razawi Ziaee in 1981. Their non-political and cultural activities have contributed to a positive picture of the Barelvi Movement. In England, the movement is considered a moderating force in Muslims. [1]

Notable scholars

Early scholars

Present

Organizations

Famous Madrasas

jamia muhammadia nooria razvia bhikhi pakistan

References

See also

External links


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