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Castes of India
Badgujar
Classification Kshatriyas
Religions Hinduism
Language Marathi, Hindi, Garhwali, Kumaoni and Awadhi
Populated States Maharashtra, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh and Himachal Pradesh
Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother-- Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. Rama and Lakshmana are always shown to be ready for battle, with bow and arrow, as it is their Kshatriya dharma to fight. Rama was from Suryavanshi lineage.

The Badgujar (or Bargujar) is one of the ancient Hindu Suryavanshi Gujar[1]Rajput tribes of India. They are among the most revered Kshatriya of ancient India. They constituted the main force in 'Haraval Tukdi' or the first line of offence in any battle.

Contents

Origin

Bargujars were originally Gujjars.[2] The name of this clan is derived from Hindi Bara 'Great' and 'Gujar', which simply means great Gujars.[3]. Historian R. V. Russell also stated that bargujars have been simply a section of the Gujjars.[4]

History

They built numerous monuments, including the fort and Nilkanth Mahadev Temple at Kalinjar; the famous Nilkanth temple complex near Tehla now in the Sariska Tiger Reserve; many other palaces and forts at Alwar, Machari, Sawai Madhopur and in Dausa. Neelkanth near Tehla was the old capital of the Bargujar tribe, its old name is Rajor or Rajor Garh.[5] Its founder was possibly Raja Bagh Singh Bargujar, in Vikrami Samvat (VS) 202 which corresponds to 145 AD, the difference being 57 years. The place was also referred to as 'Baghola'. This place was also possibly influenced by Gurjara-Pratiharas. Most carvings probably date to 9th - 10th century. Remains of more than 300 temples are there, some of them are Jain shines. One Shiva temple is still in use.

Bargujars were the allies of Pratiharas. Later, one of their famous kings was Raja Pratap Singh Bargujar, who was Prithviraj Chauhan's nephew and assisted in his fight against the Muslim invaders, who were led by Muhammad of Ghor in 1191. They also fought on the side of Rana Pratap of Mewar and Maharana Hammir as their generals. The Badgujars chose to die rather than to submit to the supremacy of the Muslim kings. Many Bargujars were put to death for not giving their daughters to Muslim rulers. Some Bargujars changed their clan name to Sikarwar to escape genocide carried out against them. A colony found refuge in present day Anupshahar, which was founded by Raja Anup Singh Bargujar, the eldest son of Raja Pratap Singh Bargujar. One of them, Raja Nune Shah Bargujar of the Samthar state,[6] fought with the British and pushed back their forces many times but later signed a peace treaty with the British in 1817.

Notes

  1. ^ Kumar Suresh Singh; B. V. Bhanu, Anthropological Survey of India (2004). People of India: Maharashtra. Popular Prakashan. ISBN 8179911012, ISBN 9788179911013. 
  2. ^ Kumar Suresh Singh; B. V. Bhanu, Anthropological Survey of India (2004). People of India: Maharashtra. Popular Prakashan. ISBN 8179911012, ISBN 9788179911013. 
  3. ^ A. H. Bingley; Krishna Prakash Bahadur (1978). Caste, tribes & culture of Rajputs. Ess Ess Publications. p. 46. "The name of this clan is derived from Hindi Bara 'Great' and 'Gujar'.." 
  4. ^ R. V. Russell (2009). The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India, Volume 4. p. 503. ISBN 0559128800, ISBN 9780559128806. http://books.google.co.in/books?id=eM1TdcVsK88C&pg=PA503&dq. 
  5. ^ http://www.archive.org/details/gazetteerofulwur00powliala
  6. ^ The Samthar state was founded in the 18th century

See also

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