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Bari
—  Comune  —
Comune di Bari
Panorama of Bari

Coat of arms
Bari is located in Italy
Bari
Location of Bari in Italy
Coordinates: 41°07′31″N 16°52′0″E / 41.12528°N 16.866667°E / 41.12528; 16.866667Coordinates: 41°07′31″N 16°52′0″E / 41.12528°N 16.866667°E / 41.12528; 16.866667
Country Italy
Region Puglia
Province Bari (BA)
Government
 - Mayor Michele Emiliano (Democratic Party)
Area
 - Total 116.20 km2 (44.9 sq mi)
Elevation 5 m (16 ft)
Population (30 April 2009)[1]
 - Total 320,160
 - Density 2,755.2/km2 (7,136.1/sq mi)
 - Demonym Baresi
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 70121-70132
Dialing code 080
Patron saint Saint Nicholas
Saint day May 8
Website Official website

Bari About this sound listen (Bari dialect: Bàre; from Latin: Barium) is the capital city of the province of Bari and of the Apulia (or, in Italian, Puglia) region, on the Adriatic Sea, in Italy. It is the second most important economic centre of mainland Southern Italy after Naples, and is well known as a port and university city, as well as the city of Saint Nicholas. The city itself has a decreasing population of about 320,000, as of 2009, over 116 km², while the fast-growing urban area counts 653,028 inhabitants over 203 km². Another 500,000 people live in the metropolitan area.

Bari is made up of four different urban sections. To the north is the closely built old town on the peninsula between two modern harbours, with the splendid Basilica of Saint Nicholas, the Cathedral of San Sabino (1035–1171) and the Swabian Castle built for Frederick II, which is now also a major nightlife district. To the south is the Murat quarter (erected by Joachim Murat), the modern heart of the city, which is laid out on a rectangular grid-plan with a promenade on the sea and the major shopping district (the via Sparano and via Argiro).

Modern residential zones surround the centre of Bari, the result of chaotic development during the 1960s and 1970s replacing the old suburbs that had developed along roads splaying outwards from gates in the city walls. In addition, the outer suburbs have developed rapidly during the 1990s. The city has a redeveloped airport named after Pope John Paul II, Karol Wojtyła Airport, with connections to several European cities.

Contents

History

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Ancient

The city was probably founded by the Peucetii. Once it passed under Roman rule in the third century BC, it developed strategic significance as the point of junction between the coast road and the Via Traiana and as a port for eastward trade; a branch road to Tarentum led from Barium. Its harbour, mentioned as early as 181 BC, was probably the principal one of the district in ancient times, as it is at present, and was the centre of a fishery. The first historical Bishop of Bari was Gervasius who was noted at the Council of Sardica in 347. The bishops were dependent on the Patriarch of Constantinople until the 10th century.

Middle Ages

After the devastations of the Gothic Wars, under Lombard rule a set of written regulations was established, the Consuetudines Barenses, which influenced similar written constitutions in other southern cities.

For a brief period of 20 years, Bari was captured by Islamic invaders and became the Emirate of Bari under the emir Kalfun in 847. The city was soon reconquered by the Byzantines in 871. In 885, it became the residence of the local Byzantine catapan, or governor. The failed revolt (1009–1011) of the Lombard nobles Melus of Bari and his brother-in-law Dattus, against the Byzantine governorate, though it was firmly repressed at the Battle of Cannae (1018), offered their Norman adventurer allies a first foothold in the region. In 1025, under the Archbishop Byzantius, Bari became attached to the see of Rome and was granted "provincial" status.

In 1071, Bari was captured by Robert Guiscard, following a three-year siege. Maio of Bari (d. 1160), a Lombard merchant's son, was the third of the great admirals of Norman Sicily. The Basilica di San Nicola was founded in 1087 to receive the relics of this saint, which were surreptitiously brought from Myra in Lycia, in Byzantine territory. The saint began his development from Saint Nicholas of Myra into Saint Nicholas of Bari and began to attract pilgrims, whose encouragement and care became central to the economy of Bari. In 1095 Peter the Hermit preached the first crusade there. In October 1098, Urban II, who had consecrated the Basilica in 1089, convened the Council of Bari, one of a series of synods convoked with the intention of reconciling the Greeks and Latins on the question of the filioque clause in the Creed, which Anselm ably defended, seated at the pope's side. The Greeks were not brought over to the Latin way of thinking, and the Great Schism was inevitable.

The Swabian Castle.

A civil war broke out in Bari in 1117 with the murder of the archbishop, Riso. Control of Bari was seized by Grimoald Alferanites, a native Lombard, and he was elected lord in opposition to the Normans. By 1123, he had increased ties with Byzantium and Venice and taken the title gratia Dei et beati Nikolai barensis princeps. Grimoald increased the cult of St Nicholas in his city. He later did homage to Roger II of Sicily, but rebelled and was defeated in 1132.

Bari was occupied by Manuel I Komnenos between 1155-1158. In 1246, Bari was sacked and razed to the ground; Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Sicily, repaired the fortress of Baris but it was subsequently destroyed several times. Bari recovered each time.

Early modern period

Isabella di Aragona, princess of Naples and widow of the Duke of Milan Gian Galeazzo Sforza, enlarged the castle, which she made her residence, 1499-1524. After the death of Bona Sforza, Queen of Poland, Bari came to be included in the Kingdom of Naples and its history contracted to a local one, as malaria became endemic in the region. Bari was wakened from its provincial somnolence by Napoleon's brother-in-law Joachim Murat. As Napoleonic King of Naples, Murat ordered the building in 1808 of a new section of the city, laid out on a rational grid plan, which bears his name today as the Murattiano. Under this stimulus, Bari developed into the most important port city of the region. The legacy of Mussolini can be seen in the imposing architecture along the seafront.

The 1943 chemical warfare disaster

Through a tragic coincidence intended by neither of the opposing sides in World War II, Bari gained the unwelcome distinction of being the only European city to experience chemical warfare in the course of that war.

On the night of December 2, 1943, German Junkers Ju 88 bombers attacked the port of Bari, which was a key supply centre for Allied forces fighting their way up the Italian Peninsula. Several Allied ships were sunk in the overcrowded harbour, including the U.S. Liberty ship John Harvey, which was carrying mustard gas; mustard gas was also reported to have been stacked on the quayside awaiting transport. The chemical agent was intended for use if German forces initiated chemical warfare. The presence of the gas was highly classified, and authorities ashore had no knowledge of it. This increased the number of fatalities, since physicians — who had no idea that they were dealing with the effects of mustard gas — prescribed treatment proper for those suffering from exposure and immersion, which proved fatal in many cases. Because rescuers were unaware they were dealing with gas casualties, many additional casualties were caused among the rescuers through contact with the contaminated skin and clothing of those more directly exposed to the gas.

On the orders of allied leaders Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Dwight D. Eisenhower, records were destroyed and the whole affair was kept secret for many years after the war. The U.S. records of the attack were declassified in 1959, but the episode remained obscure until 1967. Indeed, even today, many "Baresi" are still unaware of what happened and why. Additionally, there is considerable dispute as to the number of fatalities. In one account: "[S]ixty-nine deaths were attributed in whole or in part to the mustard gas, most of them American merchant seamen;"[2] Others put the count as high as, "more than one thousand Allied servicemen and more than one thousand Italian civilians."[3] Part of the confusion and controversy derives from the fact that the German attack, which became nicknamed "The Little Pearl Harbor" after the Japanese air attack on the American naval base in Hawaii, was highly destructive and lethal in itself, apart from the effects of the gas. Attribution of the causes of death to the gas, as distinct from the direct effects of the German attack, has proved far from easy.

The affair is the subject of two books: Disaster at Bari, by Glenn B. Infield, and Nightmare in Bari: The World War II Liberty Ship Poison Gas Disaster and Coverup, by Gerald Reminick.

The Balkan Air Force supporting the partisans in Yugoslavia was based at Bari.

Language

Bari, whilst today an industrialised port and university city, still maintains strong traditions based on its patron Saint Nicholas. Bari is known throughout Italy for its unique, often crude, spoken dialect, particularly in the Old Town, parts of which originated from a pidgin between Italian and Greek fishermen in the past, and which fishermen in Greece can still understand today.

Main sights

Bari (Lungomare Perotti, old town view).

Basilica of Saint Nicholas

St. Nicholas Basilica.

The Basilica di San Nicola (Saint Nicholas) was founded in 1087 to receive the relics of this saint, which were brought from Myra in Lycia, and now lie beneath the altar in the crypt, where are buried the Topins, which are a legacy of old thieves converted to good faith. The church is one of the four Palatine churches of Apulia (the others being the cathedrals of Acquaviva delle Fonti and Altamura, and the church of Monte Sant'Angelo sul Gargano).

Bari Cathedral

Bari Cathedral, dedicated to Saint Sabinus of Canosa (San Sabino), was begun in Byzantine style in 1034, but was destroyed in the sack of the city of 1156. A new building was thus built between 1170–1178, partially inspired by that of San Nicola. Of the original edifice, only traces of the pavement are today visible in the transept.

An important example of Apulian Romanesque architecture, the church has a simple Romanesque façade with three portals; in the upper part is a rose window decorated with monstruous and fantasy figures. The interior has a nave and two aisles, divided by sixteen columns with arcades. The crypt houses the relics of Saint Sabinus and the icon of the Madonna Odigitria.

The interior and the façade were redecorated in Baroque style during the 18th century, but these additions were deleted in the 1950s restoration.

Petruzzelli Theatre

The Petruzzelli Theatre is one of the grandest opera houses in Italy after La Scala in Milan and the San Carlo Theatre in Naples. Host to many famous opera and ballet greats throughout the 20th century, before the big arson of 27 October 1991, which destroyed it nearly all. The last 4 October 2009, after 18 years, the theatre was reopened.

Swabian Castle

The Norman-Hohenstaufen Castle.

The Norman-Hohenstaufen Castle, widely known as the Castello Svevo (Swabian Castle), was built by Roger II of Sicily around 1131. Destroyed in 1156, it was rebuilt by Frederick II of Hohenstaufen. The castle now serves as a gallery for a variety of temporary exhibitions in the city.

The Russian Church

The Russian Church, in the Carrassi district of Bari, was built in the early 20th century to welcome Russian pilgrims who came to the city to visit the church of Saint Nicholas in the old city where the relics of the saint remain.

Built on a large area of council-owned land, the city council and Italian national government were recently involved in a trade-off with the Putin government in Moscow, exchanging the piece of land on which the church stands, for, albeit indirectly, a military barracks near Bari's central railway station. The hand over was seen as building bridges between the Catholic and Russian Orthodox churches.

Barivecchia

Barivecchia, or Old Bari, is a sprawl of streets and passageways making up the section of the city to the north of the modern Murat area. Barivecchia was until fairly recently considered a no-go area by many of Bari's residents due to the high levels of petty crime. A large-scale redevelopment plan beginning with a new sewerage system and followed by the development of the two main squares, Piazza Mercantile and Piazza Ferrarese has seen the opening of many pubs and other venues. This has been welcomed by many who claim that the social life of the city, and in particular the experience for tourists in Bari, has been improved and that jobs and revenue have been created. Others point out the effects of late-night noise in the enclosed squares and criticise development based mainly on pubs and other such premises.

Se Parigi avesse il mare, sarebbe una piccola Bari’ (if Paris had the sea, it would be a little Bari). This popular saying tells you more about the local sense of humour than it does about the city, but Bari has a surprising amount of charm, particularly Barivecchia, its increasingly chic medieval old town.

Other

The Teatro Piccinni in Bari
A view of the old port of Bari
  • Teatro Margherita.
  • Teatro Piccinni.
  • Orto Botanico dell'Università di Bari, a botanical garden.
  • Santa Chiara, once church of the Teutonic Knights (as Santa maria degli Alemanni) and now closed. It was restored in 1539.
  • The medieval church of San Marco dei Veneziani, with a notable rose window in the façade.
  • San Giorgio degli Armeni.
  • Santa Teresa dei Maschi, the main Baroque church in the city (1690–1696).
  • Pane e Pomodoro Beach is the main beach within reach of the city. Its reputation has for several years suffered from the apparent presence of asbestos from nearby industrial plants.
  • The eastern seafront skyline of Bari had, until spring 2006, been dominated by the monsterous apartment complex known as Punta Perotti - a creation of the Matarrese construction empire. Clearly in violation of several fundamental Italian building regulations, Punta Perotti became the focus of a political and environmental movement calling for its demolition. After years of legal wrangling between the Matarrese firm, Bari Council and environmental groups such as Save the Earth, the court ruled in favour of its demolition and thousands gathered on the Bari seafront in April 2006 to see the event.
  • The grid-shaped Murat city Centre of Bari is said to be the largest shopping centre in all of Italy and contains a large number of high street stores and smaller shops with particular attention to high fashion and tailoring. Bari has recently seen a proliferation of out of town hypermarkets with all manner of shops and superstores attached to them.
  • Bari features two sea harbours: the Old Port as well as the New Port. The latter was constructed in 1850 and can accommodate any kind of ship—including large cargo laden vessels. It can also handle any type of traffic.[4]

Geography

Quarters

Quarters of Bari
Municipality Quarters
I Palese Macchie & Santo Spirito-Catino-San Pio
II San Paolo & Stanic
III Picone & Poggiofranco
IV Carbonara-Santa Rita, Ceglie del Campo & Loseto
V Japigia, Torre a Mare & San Giorgio
VI Carrassi, San Pasquale & Mungivacca
VII Madonnella
VIII Libertà & Marconi-San Girolamo-Fesca
IX Murat & San Nicola

Shown above are the twenty quarters of Bari: these twenty neighbourhoods or "quartiere" as they are known, are further divided into nine governmental community boards.[5]

Climate

Bari enjoys a semi-arid Mediterranean climate with mild winters and warm to hot, dry summers. Snowfall in winter is possible. During the summer of 2008 temperatures reached as high as 42°C.

Weather data for Bari
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 12
(54)
12
(54)
14
(57)
17
(63)
21
(70)
25
(77)
28
(82)
28
(82)
25
(77)
21
(70)
16
(61)
13
(55)
20
(68)
Daily mean °C (°F) 8
(46)
8
(46)
11
(52)
13
(55)
17
(63)
21
(70)
24
(75)
23
(73)
21
(70)
17
(63)
12
(54)
10
(50)
16
(61)
Average low °C (°F) 5
(41)
5
(41)
6
(43)
8
(46)
12
(54)
16
(61)
19
(66)
19
(66)
16
(61)
13
(55)
8
(46)
6
(43)
11
(52)
Precipitation cm (inches) 4
(1.6)
4
(1.6)
7
(2.8)
3
(1.2)
3
(1.2)
4
(1.6)
2
(0.8)
3
(1.2)
5
(2)
5
(2)
5
(2)
7
(2.8)
57
(22.4)
Source: Weatherbase[6] 21 June 2009

Fiera del Levante

The Fiera del Levante is said to be the largest trade fair in the Adriatic and involves exhibitions from many sectors and industries. Held in September in the Fiera site on the west side of Bari city centre, the Fiera attracts many exhibitors from Italy, around the Mediterranean, its trade corridors to the east and beyond. Mainly focused on agriculture and industry, there are also stalls, exhibitions and presentations by a wide variety of compaines and organisations in many fields. There is also a "Fair of Nations" which displays handcrafted and locally produced goods from all over the world.

This year's Fiera also saw an "Expo Fishing" which brought together fishing methods, tackle and know-how from across the Mediterranean.

Culinary Bari

A dish of orecchiette.

Bari's cuisine, one of Italy's most traditional and noteworthy, is based on three typical agricultural products found within the surrounding Puglia region, namely wheat, olive oil and wine. Bari cuisine is also enriched by the wide variety of fruit and vegetables produced locally. Local flour is used in homemade bread and pasta production including, most notably, the famous orecchiette hat-shaped pasta, recchietelle or strascinate, chiancarelle (orecchiette of different sizes) and cavatelli.

Homemade dough is also used for baked calzoni stuffed with onions, anchovies, capers and olives; fried panzerotti with mozzarella, simple focaccia alla barese with tomatoes, little savoury taralli, friselle and sgagliozze, fried slices of polenta all make up the Bari culinary reportoire.

Olive oil and garlic are widely in use. Vegetable minestrone, chick peas, broad beans, chickory, celery and fennel are also often served as first courses or side dishes.

Meat dishes and the local Barese ragù often include lamb, pork and often horse meat, considered something of a local delicacy.

Pasta al forno, a baked pasta dish, is very popular in Bari and was historically a Sunday dish, or a dish used at the start of Lent when all the rich ingredients such as eggs and pork had to be used for religious reasons. The recipe commonly consists of penne or similar tubular pasta shapes, a tomato sauce, small beef and pork meatballs and halved hard boiled eggs; but different families have variations. The pasta is then topped with mozzarella or similar cheese and then baked in the oven to make the dish have its trademark crispy texture.

Bari, being the capital of an important fishing area, offers a range of fresh fish and seafood, often eaten raw. Octopus, sea urchins and mussels feature heavily. Indeed, perhaps Bari's most famous dish is the oven-baked Riso, patate e cozze (rice, with potatoes and mussels).

Bari and its province, not to mention the Puglia region has a range of notable wines including Primitivo, Castel del Monte and Moscato di Trani.

Administrative divisions

Bari is separated into nine administrative divisions:

  • I: Palese Macchie, Santo Spirito, Catino, San Pio
  • II: San Paolo, Stanic
  • III: Picone, Poggiofranco
  • IV: Carbonara, Santa Rita, Ceglie del Campo, Loseto
  • V: Japigia, Torre a Mare, San Giorgio
  • VI: Carrassi, San Pasquale, Mungivacca
  • VII: Madonnella
  • VIII: Libertà, Marconi, San Girolamo, Fesca
  • IX: Murat, San Nicola

Sport

Local football club A.S. Bari, currently competing in Serie A, plays in the impressive Stadio San Nicola, an architecturally innovative 58,000-seater stadium purpose-built for the 1990 FIFA World Cup. The stadium also hosted the 1991 European Cup Final.

Demographics

In 2007, there were 325,052 people residing in Bari (in which slightly 1.6 million live in the greater Bari area), located in the province of Bari, Puglia, of whom 48.1% were male and 51.9% were female. Minors (children ages 18 and younger) totalled 17.90 percent of the population compared to pensioners who number 19.08 percent. This compares with the Italian average of 18.06 percent (minors) and 19.94 percent (pensioners). The average age of Bari residents is 42 compared to the Italian average of 42. In the five years between 2002 and 2007, the population of Bari grew by 2.69 percent, while Italy as a whole grew by 3.56 percent.[7][8] The current birth rate of Bari is 8.67 births per 1,000 inhabitants compared to the Italian average of 9.45 births.

As of 2006, 98.34% of the population was of Italian descent. The largest immigrant group came from other European nations (particularly those from Albania and Greece): 0.68% and East Africa: 0.42%. Immigrants from North Africa and East Asia make up an even smaller number portion of the population.

People associated with Bari

International relations

Twin towns — Sister cities

Bari is twinned with:

In popular culture

Bari is mentioned in the 1995 film The Bridges of Madison County starring Clint Eastwood and Meryl Streep. In the film Francesca tells Robert that she comes from a town nobody ever heard of called Bari. But he tells her that he has been to Bari and that he got off the train at Bari because it looked pretty.

See also

References

Further reading

  • Vito Antonio Melchiorre, Note storiche su Bari 2001.

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Bari is the capital of the Apulia region of Italy. It's the mezzogiorno's (Italy's south) largest city after Naples, and a bustling commercial center and port.

Understand

Bari is the largest and most important city of Apulia (even larger than Lecce) and stands on the Adriatic coast. It's mainly famous for being one of the exit doors of Italy, where travellers leave on ferries for neighboring countries. The city authorities, however, have been trying to raise its tourism profile and awareness of Bari's old town, which has retained its ancient Medieval plan and contains many historic buildings and sites. The old town was the heart of pre-Roman and Roman Bari and it is now possible to find several hip bars and restaurants open "from dusk til dawn" in this once dark and unsafe zone.

Get in

By plane

There are approximately 40 various cheap flights into Bari (BRI) from various European airports.

By train

Check www.trenitalia.com for time tables and prices.

By car

You can get to Bari by A14 highway, which runs from Bologna to Taranto following the Adriatic coast.

By bus

You can use Onbus Company to travel from Sicily to Puglia.

By boat

Bari is the destination for ferries incoming from the Greek port of Patra and Igoumenitsa. If you are traveling on a Eurorail during the low season, the cost is 16 Euro, during the mid season, 31 Euro. A normal ticket to Igoumenitsa is about 29 euros on the deck and in low - season. There are also ships to Bar and Kotor (Montenegro), Dubrovnik (Croatia) and to Durrës (Albania). Ferry operators are either Superfast Ferries, Blue Star Ferries, Azzurraline or Jadrolinija. An up-to-date site with international ferry schedules is here.

Get around

There are many public buses. A ticket is about 1,50 euros.

See

There a lot of places to see in Bari, especially in the ancient part of the city, called Bari Vecchia by locals. It's a beautiful mediaeval quarter in which there are a lot of important churches. The cathedral of Saint Nicolaus, for instance, has a gold ceiling and a crypt.

There is a small town - 20 minutes outside of Bari named "adelfia - Montrone". The patron saint is San Trifone. Nov 9 is the start of a three day celebration. On Nov 9 is the early evening a giant beautiful balloon is release which signifies the start of the festival. On the 10th, the statue of San Trifone is brought out of the church and paraded around the town. Bands from all over Italy come and perform on the outdoor stage. Fireworks are displayed throughout the evening into the early morning. The different men's club compete on which club can have the biggest, loudest and spectacular display. Vendors surround the town with goods,food and gifts. Often there are over 200 parked buses from all over southern Italy. It really is a popular celebration.

Do

The Saint of the city is Saint Nicolaus who is celebrated on December 6th . The city's main celebration, however, takes place in May 6-8th with historical reconstructions, popular music and fireworks. For this event many pilgrims come from all over the world.

Buy

Bags, shoes.

  • Hotel Terranobile Meta Resort (Hotel Terranobile Meta Resort), Via Bitritto 101. Spa resort few kilometers away from Bari, with wellness center and swimming pools.  edit

Stay safe

Bari Vecchia is a beautiful quarter but because of the narrow, crowded streets and the presence of tourists, it is the preferred place for local pickpocketers.

Get out

Nice towns to discover around Bari are Bitonto, Matera, Alberobello and Trani. There are many direct trains a day. Ticket to Matera or Alberobello is about 4 euros in one direction.

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

BARI, a tribe of Nilotic negroes, living on the banks of the upper Nile some 200 m. N. of Albert Nyanza. They have as neighbours the Dinka to the north, the Madi to the south, and the Galla to the east. The men are tall and thin, the women fat and under middle height. Their colour is a deep dead brown. The men and unmarried girls go practically naked, the married women wearing a goatskin dyed red. The body is ornamented with red clay and the lower incisors are often extracted. Their sole wealth is cattle and their chief food milk and blood; meat is only eaten when a cow happens to die. They live in round grass huts with conical roofs. Twins are considered unlucky, the mother is divorced by her husband and her family must refund part of the marriage-price. The dead are buried in the hut; a square grave is dug in which the body is arranged in a sitting position with the hands tied behind the back. The most important men in the country are the rainmakers, who are reverenced even more than the chiefs, and, indeed, are famous among the surrounding tribes. The Bari warriors have been much recruited for the Egyptian army and were formerly used as slave-hunters by the Arab traders.

See Sir Samuel Baker, The Albert N'yanza (London, 1866); Friedrich Muller, Die Sprache der Bari (Vienna, 2864); G. Casati, Ten Years in Equatoria (London, 1891); W. Junker, Travels in Africa (English ed., 1890-1892); R. C. Owen, Bari Grammar (1908).


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also bari

Contents

English

Proper noun

Singular
Bari

Plural
-

Bari

  1. Province of Apulia, Italy.
  2. Town, port and capital of Bari and also the capital of Apulia.
  3. A Nilotic language of Sudan.

Translations

  • Bulgarian: Бари
  • French: Bari (1, 2)
  • Italian: Bari (1) , Bari (2) f.
  • Maltese: Bari mt(mt)

External links

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of abir
  • RAIB

Italian

Wikipedia-logo.png
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Bari

Wikipedia it

Proper noun

Bari f.

  1. Bari (province)
  2. Bari (town)

Derived terms


Simple English

Bari (Italian: Bari;) is a city in southern Italy. Bari is the capital of the Bari Provence and of the Apulia Region. 328.458 people live in Bari. It is the second biggest city in southern Italy (after Naples).


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