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The Barmen Declaration or The Theological Declaration of Barmen 1934 is a statement of the Confessing Church opposing the Nazi-supported "German-Christian" movement. The "German Christians" who were hostile to the Confessing Church combined extreme nationalism with anti-Semitism. The Barmen Declaration specifically rejects the subordination of the church to the state. Rather, the Declaration states that the church "is solely Christ's property, and that it lives and wants to live solely from his comfort and from his direction in the expectation of his appearance."

The Declaration was mostly written by Reformed theologian Karl Barth, but was also crafted in part by other Confessing Church leaders, including Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Its ecumenical nature can be seen by its inclusion in the Constitution of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) [1]. Its name comes from its adoption by church representatives who had met in 1934 in the German region of Barmen.

One of the main purposes of the Declaration was to establish a three-church confessional consensus opposing pro-nazi "German Christianity". These three churches were Lutheran, Reformed, and United.

After 1945 the threat of pro-nazi "German Christianity" abated, providing several conservative Lutheran theologians a fresh new era in which they were now far less politically encumbered and able to speak out against Barmen for having challenged four tenets of traditional Lutheranism: their Orders of creation, natural revelation, the doctrine of the two kingdoms, and the relationship between Law and Gospel.[1]

Notes

References

  • Douglas, J. D. (1988). Wright, David D.; Ferguson, Sinclair B.. ed. New Dictionary of Theology. Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity Press. pp. 76. ISBN 0-85110-636-6.  

External links

http://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/barmen.htm

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The Barmen Declaration or The Theological Declaration of Barmen 1934 is a statement of the Confessing Church opposing the Nazi-supported "German-Christian" movement. The "German Christians" who were hostile to the Confessing Church combined extreme nationalism with anti-Semitism. The Barmen Declaration specifically rejects the subordination of the church to the state. Rather, the Declaration states that the church "is solely Christ's property, and that it lives and wants to live solely from his comfort and from his direction in the expectation of his appearance."

The Declaration was mostly written by Reformed theologian Karl Barth, but was also crafted in part by other Confessing Church leaders, including Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Its ecumenical nature can be seen by its inclusion in the Constitution of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) [1] and the Book of Order of the world wide Moravian Unity, the Unitas Fratrum. Its name comes from its adoption by church representatives who had met in 1934 in the German town of Barmen.

One of the main purposes of the Declaration was to establish a three-church confessional consensus opposing pro-nazi "German Christianity". These three churches were Lutheran, Reformed, and United.

After 1945, the threat of pro-nazi "German Christianity" abated, providing several conservative Lutheran theologians a fresh new era in which they were now far less politically encumbered and able to speak out against Barmen for having challenged four tenets of traditional Lutheranism: their Orders of creation, natural revelation, the doctrine of the two kingdoms, and the relationship between Law and Gospel.[1]

Notes

References

  • Douglas, J. D. (1988). Wright, David D.; Ferguson, Sinclair B.. ed. New Dictionary of Theology. Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity Press. pp. 76. ISBN 0-85110-636-6. 

External links


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