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Battle of Courtai, 1918
Part of the Western Front of World War I
Map of the final Allied offensives on the Western Front, 1918
Date 14 October – 19 October 1918
Location Ypres, Belgium to Ghent, Belgium
Result Decisive Allied victory
Belligerents
 Belgium
 France
 United Kingdom
 United States
 German Empire
Commanders
Belgium King Albert I
France Jean Degoutte
United Kingdom Herbert Plumer
German Empire
For other battles of this name, see Battle of Courtrai.

The Battle of Courtrai (also known as the Second Battle of Belgium (French: 2ème Bataille de Belgique) and the Battle of Roulers (French: Bataille de Roulers)) is one of a series of battles in northern France and southern Belgium from late September through October 1918.

Contents

Background

After the success of the Allies in breaking the Hindenburg Line (see the Fifth Battle of Ypres), the Allies conceived of a strategy to pusue the Germans for as long as possible (until stopped by the winter rains). Poor terrain caused a halt in the Hundred Days Offensive after the Fifth Battle of Ypres, however by mid October the Army Group of Flanders (G.A.F.) (comprising 12 Belgian divisions, 10 British divisions (from the BEF's 2nd Army) and 6 French Divisions (from the French 6th Army) under the command of King Albert I of Belgium) was ready to resume the offensive.

Battles

The offensive started on 14 October, and had captured Roulers by the next day. By October 17 Ostend, Lille and Douai had been recaptured, by October 19 Bruges and Zeebrugge had been recaptured, and by October 20 the Dutch border had been reached.

Aftermath

By the Armistice, the front line had been advanced by an average of 45 miles, and ran from Terneuzen, to Ghent, along the River Scheldt to Ath and from there to Saint-Ghislain, where the front line linked up with the BEF on the Somme.

References

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