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Bemegride
Systematic (IUPAC) name
4-ethyl-4-methylpiperidine-2,6-dione
Identifiers
CAS number 64-65-3
ATC code R07AB05
PubChem 2310
ChemSpider 2220
Chemical data
Formula C 8H13NO2  
Mol. mass 155.194 g/mol
SMILES eMolecules & PubChem
Synonyms Methetharimide
β,β-methylethylglutarimide
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability  ?
Metabolism  ?
Half life  ?
Excretion  ?
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat.  ?
Legal status
Routes  ?
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Bemegride (also known as Megimide) is a central Nervous System stimulant and antidote for barbiturate poisoning.

John Bodkin Adams case

Bemegride is notable in legal history as the drug suspected serial killer Dr John Bodkin Adams failed to prescribe correctly to his patient Gertrude Hullett. Hullett took an overdose of barbiturates on 19 July 1956 but Adams only gave her a single 10cc dose of bemegride three days later on the 22nd, despite having acquired 100cc for her treatment. Hullett died the next day on 23 July 1956. Adams was charged but never tried for her murder.[1]

Animal use

Bemegride is also used to induce convulsions in experimental animals.[2]

References

  1. ^ Cullen, Pamela V., A Stranger in Blood: The Case Files on Dr John Bodkin Adams, London, Elliott & Thompson, 2006, ISBN 1-904027-19-9
  2. ^ Definition: bemegride from Online Medical Dictionary
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