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Benjamin Davies (born Benjamin John Gareth Davies, 19 September 1980, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK), is a British actor of the stage, film and television.

Davies grew up in Scotland, Devon, Cornwall, Sussex and London, he is of Welsh heritage.

Education

He was educated at Linlithgow Primary (Scotland), Tavistock College (Devon), Lewes Priory (Sussex) and Drama Centre (Chalk Farm London).

Among his earliest performances were at Theatre Royal, Plymouth, National Youth Theatre, Glyndebourne Opera House where he was a member of their young companies.

In 1997 Davies won entry to the prestigious Drama Centre London aged 17, where in 1998 he began his training under Yat Malgrem,Christopher Fettes and Reuven Adiv.

Career

After graduating in 2001 Davies went on to work at the Royal Court Theatre where in 2002 he won a Laurence Olivier Award for his portrayal of Danny in Grae Cleugh's "Fucking Games". In 2003 he went to the Traverse Theatre to work with Wilson Milam, then to the National Theatre Studio. In 2004 he played "Dill" in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mocking Bird". Later that year he worked with the avant-garde film director Peter Greenaway on "Tulse Lupers Suitcase" In 2005 he played Dominic Morrison in "Sea of Souls" for BBC Television, then Davies played "Lawrence" in the first ever staged production of "Lovely Evening" by Peter Gill, for the actor Daniel Evans (actor) directorial début for the Young Vic Theatre. Later that year he joined the Oxford Stage Company appearing in "Rookery Nook" by Ben Travers for Dominic Dromgoole final show there. In 2007 he played "Mickybo" in "Mojo Mickybo" by Owen McCafferty at the Trafalgar Studios in the West End and in 2008, "Ken" in a revival of Howard Brenton's Weapons of Happiness.

External links

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