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Berti Vogts
Berti Vogts (6. April 2006)
Personal information
Full name Hans-Hubert Vogts
Date of birth 30 December 1946 (1946-12-30) (age 63)
Place of birth    Büttgen, near Düsseldorf, West Germany
Height 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in)
Playing position Defender
Senior career1
Years Club App (Gls)*
1965–1979 Borussia Mönchengladbach 419 (32)   
National team
1967–1978 West Germany 096 0(1)
Teams managed
1990–1998
2000–2001
2001–2002
2002–2004
2007–2008
2008–
Germany
Bayer Leverkusen
Kuwait
Scotland
Nigeria
Azerbaijan

1 Senior club appearances and goals
counted for the domestic league only.
* Appearances (Goals)

Hans-Hubert "Berti" Vogts (German pronunciation: [ˈbɛɐ̯tiː foːkts], born on 30 December 1946 in Kaarst, near Neuss, Germany) is a German football manager and former player. He is currently manager of the Azerbaijan national team.

Contents

Club career

Vogts joined the boys' football team of local sports club VfR Büttgen in 1954 when he was seven, staying with them until his 1965 transfer to Borussia Mönchengladbach. A right-side defender, his tenacity earned him the nickname "Der Terrier".[1]

He was one of the key figures during Borussia's golden years in the 1970s, when it won the Bundesliga five times, the German Cup once, and the UEFA Cup twice.

Vogts made 419 Bundesliga appearances for Mönchengladbach, scoring 32 times and also appeared 64 times for the club in European competition, scoring 8 goals. Vogts remained with Mönchengladbach until he retired from playing in 1979.

International career

Vogts played 9 international boys' games for West Germany, made 3 appearances for the under-23s team, and has 96 senior caps, making him one of Germany's most capped players. He was captain for 20 of the senior games, scored one international goal and was also a member of the German national team that won the 1974 World Cup. Nicknamed “Der Terrier” for always fighting for every ball as it was his last, Vogts was a big favourite with his home crowd. Vogts famously marked, and subdued, Johan Cruyff, in the final of the 1974 World Cup in Munich, Germany.

Management career

After his playing career ended, he became a coach for West Germany's under-20 national team, and continued in that role until 1990. Starting in 1986, he became an assistant manager of the senior national side. In 1990, he was promoted to manager of the national team as successor of World Cup-winning Franz Beckenbauer. After the final match Beckenbauer famously said that the reunified Germany will "probably be unbeatable for years",[2] a statement which turned out to be a burden for Vogts during the upcoming years. Although Vogts led the German national team to a EURO 92 runner-up place and a EURO 96 win, two disappointing World Cup quarter-final defeats in 1994 and 1998 are also on his sheet. After two unsatisfying friendly matches he stepped down as manager in September 1998.[3]

After some time out of managing, he was appointed manager of Bayer Leverkusen in November 2000. The following May, despite earning Bayer Leverkusen UEFA Champions League qualification, he was fired. He became manager of the Kuwait national team in August 2001.

After six months with Kuwait, Vogts resigned to assume the position of manager of the Scottish national team.[4]

Scotland performed badly during his two and half year tenure, and suffered a series of heavy defeats, including 6–0 to the Netherlands, 5–0 to France, 4–0 to Wales, 4–1 to South Korea and 3–0 to Hungary, as well as a humiliating 2-2 draw with the lowly Faroe Islands. This caused the team to drop to a record low in the FIFA World Rankings.[5]

Vogts in 2009.

An October 2004 draw with Moldova essentially put paid to Scotland's hopes of qualifying for the 2006 World Cup, and Vogts resigned the following month, with a year and a half remaining on his contract, citing "disgraceful abuse".[6] He later vowed never to return to football management following this "abuse" though he did not rule out a return to football on a coaching basis.

Despite previously asserting he would never manage again, in January 2007 Vogts was appointed manager of Nigeria and signed a four-year contract. After a 13-month spell, he resigned following a poor performance at the 2008 African Nations Cup.[7] In April 2008 he was appointed coach of Azerbaijan on a two-year contract.[8]He extended his contract with AFFA until the end of qualifying of Euro 2012 after successful results.[9][10]

Career statistics

[11] [12]

Club performance League Cup League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Germany League DFB-Pokal Premiere Ligapokal Europe Total
1965–66 Borussia Mönchengladbach Bundesliga 34 0
1966–67 34 1
1967–68 34 6
1968–69 34 8
1969–70 34 5
1970–71 34 1
1971–72 19 1
1972–73 34 3
1973–74 27 3
1974–75 34 0
1975–76 34 1
1976–77 27 1
1977–78 34 2
1978–79 6 0
Total Germany 419 32
Career Total 419 32

Honours

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Player

Coach

References

  1. ^ "Vogts: Africans can reach semis". fifa.com. 6 August 2007. http://www.fifa.com/worldfootball/news/newsid=564181.html. Retrieved 3 May 2009.  
  2. ^ "SPIEGEL Interview with Franz Beckenbauer: "Football Has an Incredible Power Beyond Sport"". SPIEGEL Online. 2006-05-29. http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiegel/0,1518,418634,00.html. Retrieved 2008-11-03.  
  3. ^ "Another Day, Another Coach Gone:Now It's Vogts". International Herald Tribune. 1998-09-09. http://www.iht.com/articles/1998/09/09/rob.t.php. Retrieved 2008-11-03.  
  4. ^ "Vogts to be Scotland boss". BBC Sport. 2002-01-21. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/scotland/1773147.stm. Retrieved 2007-09-02.  
  5. ^ "Scotland hit new low in rankings". BBC Sport. 2004-11-10. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/internationals/3998817.stm. Retrieved 2007-04-12.  
  6. ^ "Vogts resigns from Scotland job". BBC Sport. 2004-11-01. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/internationals/3734094.stm. Retrieved 2007-09-02.  
  7. ^ "Berti Vogts ends Nigeria reign". BBC Sport. 2008-02-20. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/africa/7255130.stm. Retrieved 2008-04-08.  
  8. ^ "Vogts accepts Azeri challenge". uefa.com. 2008-04-04. http://www.uefa.com/competitions/worldcup/news/kind=1/newsid=680090.html. Retrieved 2008-04-08.  
  9. ^ Berti Vogts extended his contract with the Azerbaijan national team
  10. ^ Berti Vogts signs new contract as Azerbaijan coach
  11. ^ "Berti VOGTS". http://www.level-k.com/player/B_Vogts.htm.  
  12. ^ "Berti Vogts". http://www.world-soccer.org/p-08133.htm.  

External links

Achievements
Preceded by
Richard Møller Nielsen
UEFA European Football Championship Winning Coach
1996
Succeeded by
Roger Lemerre
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Augustine Eguavoen
Nigerian national football team manager
2007–2008
Succeeded by
James Peters
Preceded by
Gjoko Hadžievski
Azerbaijan national football team manager
2008–
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Franz Beckenbauer
Germany captain
1977-1978
Succeeded by
Sepp Maier

Simple English

Berti Vogts
File:Berti Vogts
Personal information
Full name Berti Vogts
Date of birth 30 December 1946 (1946-12-30) (age 64)
Place of birth    Büttgen, West Germany
Height 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in)
Playing position Defender (retired)
Senior clubs
Years Club
1965-1979 Borussia Mönchengladbach
National team
1967-1978 Germany
Teams managed
1990-1998
2000-2001
2001-2002
2002-2004
2007-2008
2008-
Germany
Bayer Leverkusen
Kuwait
Scotland
Nigeria
Azerbaijan

Berti Vogts (born 30 December 1946) is a former German football player. He has played for Germany national team.

Club career statistics

[1]

Club Performance League
SeasonClubLeague AppsGoals
GermanyLeague
1965/66Borussia MönchengladbachBundesliga340
1966/67341
1967/68346
1968/69348
1969/70345
1970/71341
1971/72191
1972/73343
1973/74273
1974/75340
1975/76341
1976/77271
1977/78342
1978/7960
CountryGermany 41932
Total 41932

International career statistics

[2]

Germany national team
YearAppsGoals
196720
1968110
196970
1970140
197170
197210
197350
1974140
197570
197671
1977110
1978100
Total961

References

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