The Full Wiki

More info on Billy Whitehurst

Billy Whitehurst: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Billy Whitehurst
Personal information
Full name William Whitehurst
Date of birth 10 June 1959 (1959-06-10) (age 50)
Place of birth    Thurnscoe, England
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Playing position Striker
Senior career1
Years Club App (Gls)*
1977-1978
1978-1980
1980
1980-1985
1985-1986
1986-1988
1988
1988
1988-1990
1990-1991
1990
1991-1992
1992
1992
1992
1992
1992
1992
1992
1993
1993
1993-1994
1994-1995
Retford Town
Bridlington Trinity
Mexborough Town
Hull City
Newcastle United
Oxford United
Reading
Sunderland
Hull City
Sheffield United
Stoke City (loan)
Doncaster Rovers
Crewe Alexandra (loan)
St George-Budapest
Hatfield Main
Kettering Town
Goole Town
Stafford Rangers
Mossley
Glentoran
South China
Voicelink
Frickley Athletic



193 (47)
028 0(7)
040 0(4)
017 0(8)
017 0(3)
036 0(5)
022 0(2)
003 0(0)
022 0(1)
010 0(0)
011 0(4)

04 0(0)

02 0(0)
02 0(0)
06 0(4)
04 0(2)   

1 Senior club appearances and goals
counted for the domestic league only.
* Appearances (Goals)

William "Billy" Whitehurst (born 10 June, 1959 in Thurnscoe, South Yorkshire) was an English professional footballer during the 1980s-1990s.

Whitehurst started his career playing for a number of local teams, one being Mexborough Town in the semi-professional leagues, whilst working for the local council as a bricklayer. He eventually made the move into the professional ranks with Hull City in 1980 and after a shaky start soon cemented his place as one of the most popular players to have ever played for the club. His upturn in form had not gone un-noticed and he joined Newcastle United in 1985 as their then record signing. Despite playing in a side featuring Peter Beardsley and Paul Gascoigne, the move did not work out and following a spat with his own supporters Whitehurst joined Oxford United, where it was rumoured he supplemented his football earnings by engaging in bare knuckle boxing bouts with local Gypsies.

The move there was similarly disappointing and Whitehurst became something of a footballing wanderer, playing for a further six football league clubs. Spells at Reading, Sunderland, Sheffield United, Stoke City, Doncaster Rovers, Crewe Alexandra and a second spell at Hull City produced mixed results. However, Whitehurst's hard man persona and colourful off field antics ensured he always caused a reaction and cemented his place as something of a cult figure within the game. Whitehurst ended his playing days abroad, playing in Northern Ireland, Australia and in Hong Kong with South China A.A. (1992-1993) before a long-standing knee injury caused his retirement in 1993.

After his football career ended Whitehurst ran several pubs in his native South Yorkshire, however he gave up his licence following an alleged assault on a customer for which he was eventually found not guilty. Whitehurst again hit the headlines in 2005 when he was convicted of a £12,000 benefit fraud after failing to declare a footballer's pension whilst he claimed unemployment benefit. Whitehurst claimed the matter was an oversight and he was given a probation order. In mitigation he also admitted to a long standing addiction to gambling which had cost him much of his earnings as a footballer. Today he does occasional work on building sites and trains greyhounds. He has made forays into the after-dinner-speaking circuit and is planning an autobiography entitled "Football's hardest man."

It has been printed in the press that both Vinnie Jones and Neil "Razor" Ruddock consider Billy as the toughest player they have come across.

In his autobiography, 'A Matter of Opinion' (Bantam Books 2000) the Scotland and Liverpool defender Alan Hansen says of Billy Whitehurst: "He was six feet tall and weighed more than thirteen stone and he knew how to exploit this. Indeed. because of his power in the air, aggression and courage, he was one of the opposing strikers who frightened me the most - and I do mean frightened".

References

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message